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Bob Belden

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January 5, 1992 | DON HECKMAN
Don't call Bob Belden's 16-piece group a "big band." "Nah," says the thirty-something saxophonist, arranger and bandleader. "That sounds too much like Harry James. I like to think of it as a 'small orchestra.' " Whatever the label, the little-known New York-based Belden and his big-small ensemble took a dramatic step toward greater visibility this fall with the release of "The Music of Sting" on Blue Note Records.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Don Heckman
Williams and Belden, two of the finest arranger-composers in contemporary music, have given themselves unusually demanding musical challenges in these two seemingly disparate, but oddly similar recordings. In each case, the program of music consists of songs primarily associated with a singer: Frank Sinatra in "Sinatraland," Carole King in "Tapestry."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Don Heckman
Williams and Belden, two of the finest arranger-composers in contemporary music, have given themselves unusually demanding musical challenges in these two seemingly disparate, but oddly similar recordings. In each case, the program of music consists of songs primarily associated with a singer: Frank Sinatra in "Sinatraland," Carole King in "Tapestry."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1996 | Bill Kohlhaase, Bill Kohlhaase is a regular contributor to Calendar
The floor in Studio C in the basement of Hollywood's historic Capitol Records tower is cluttered with crates, each filled with recording tape boxes and their precious rounds of Mylar-preserved history pulled from the archives of Blue Note Records. These original master tapes, preserving sessions from many of the great names in the history of jazz, sport handwritten labels that give only hints of what's inside: "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy," "Live in London" or simply "Ervin."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1996 | Bill Kohlhaase, Bill Kohlhaase is a regular contributor to Calendar
The floor in Studio C in the basement of Hollywood's historic Capitol Records tower is cluttered with crates, each filled with recording tape boxes and their precious rounds of Mylar-preserved history pulled from the archives of Blue Note Records. These original master tapes, preserving sessions from many of the great names in the history of jazz, sport handwritten labels that give only hints of what's inside: "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy," "Live in London" or simply "Ervin."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
*** Bob Belden, "The Music of Sting," Blue Note. Using Sting's music as the basis for a jazz album is a good idea. Belden's charts for ensembles are first-rate blendings of superb material and beautifully crafted arrangements. Among the best moments are the instrumentals "They Dance Alone" and "Dream of the Blue Turtles," on which Rick Margitza, Joey Calderazzo, Bobby Watson and John Scofield are among the soloists.
NEWS
February 27, 1997
(Who took home the most statuettes.) Babyface: 3 The Beatles: 3 Eric Clapton: 3 Beck: 2 Bob Belden: 2 Toni Braxton: 2 Michael Brecker: 2 Sheryl Crow: 2 Celine Dion: 2 David Foster: 2 Vince Gill: 2 LeAnn Rimes: 2 Phil Schaap: 2 Voices Clint Black appearing as a presenter with teenager LeAnn Rimes: "It's very good to be here tonight, and with LeAnn, who's already won two Grammys tonight. You know, when I was 14, I had a paper route."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1988 | A. JAMES LISKA
Red Rodney, who came to jazz prominence with Charlie Parker in 1949, remains at heart a be-bopper. But his approach is fresh and spirited, his style contemporary. In town as a last-minute substitute for the ailing Toots Thielemans, one example of the 60-year-old trumpeter's modern attitude and his respect for tradition came, Thursday night at the Catalina Bar & Grill, during a rendition of the traditional "Greensleeves."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2001 | DON HECKMAN
There may be no iconic figures present in this year's Grammy nominations, but there's still plenty from which to choose. * Jazz vocal album: The ladies have a lock here, with Nnenna Freelon poised to make an upward career move. But the equally worthy Dianne Reeves and Dee Dee Bridgewater are almost as likely to win. * Jazz instrumental album: Perennial nominee Michael Brecker should score here or in the instrumental solo category.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1992 | DON HECKMAN
Don't call Bob Belden's 16-piece group a "big band." "Nah," says the thirty-something saxophonist, arranger and bandleader. "That sounds too much like Harry James. I like to think of it as a 'small orchestra.' " Whatever the label, the little-known New York-based Belden and his big-small ensemble took a dramatic step toward greater visibility this fall with the release of "The Music of Sting" on Blue Note Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1997
More or fewer than five nominations in a category is a result of ties. General Categories Record of the Year: "Give Me One Reason," Tracy Chapman (Chapman and Don Gehman, producers); "Change the World," Eric Clapton (Babyface, producer); "Because You Loved Me (Theme From 'Up Close and Personal')," Celine Dion (David Foster, producer); "Ironic," Alanis Morissette (Glen Ballard, producer); "1979," the Smashing Pumpkins (Billy Corgan, Flood and Alan Moulder, producers).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2001 | DON HECKMAN
This year's jazz Grammy nominations are surprising in one significant sense: There's no real headliner. Lacking last year's high-visibility presence of Diana Krall, and the absence of such names as Wynton Marsalis and Sonny Rollins, the selections reflect the eclectic nature of today's jazz as well as its scarcity of iconic figures.
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