Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBob Brozman
IN THE NEWS

Bob Brozman

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | McClatchy Newspapers
Guitarist and ethnomusicologist Bob Brozman, who progressed from an early fascination with the delta blues of the South to a consuming passion for the traditional music of Hawaii and became a leading authority on the National steel guitar, has died. He was 59. Brozman was found dead April 23 at his home in Santa Cruz. His death was ruled a suicide, according to the coroner's office of the Santa Cruz County Sheriff's Department. Brozman emerged in Santa Cruz in the 1970s as a street musician, playing a decidedly uncontemporary American roots style of music ranging from obscure jazz tunes to Hawaiian chanties.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | McClatchy Newspapers
Guitarist and ethnomusicologist Bob Brozman, who progressed from an early fascination with the delta blues of the South to a consuming passion for the traditional music of Hawaii and became a leading authority on the National steel guitar, has died. He was 59. Brozman was found dead April 23 at his home in Santa Cruz. His death was ruled a suicide, according to the coroner's office of the Santa Cruz County Sheriff's Department. Brozman emerged in Santa Cruz in the 1970s as a street musician, playing a decidedly uncontemporary American roots style of music ranging from obscure jazz tunes to Hawaiian chanties.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1997 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bob Brozman can hardly contain his enthusiasm about music, in particular his devotion to the National line of metal-bodied stringed instruments. It's easy to see how this ethnomusicologist could write volumes about it, and that's exactly what he did in his 300-page book, "The History and Artistry of National Resonator Instruments," (Centerstream, 1993).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1997 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bob Brozman can hardly contain his enthusiasm about music, in particular his devotion to the National line of metal-bodied stringed instruments. It's easy to see how this ethnomusicologist could write volumes about it, and that's exactly what he did in his 300-page book, "The History and Artistry of National Resonator Instruments," (Centerstream, 1993).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the scraggliest-looking guitar aces have one thing in common with the famous bruisers of the pro sports world: They get paid for endorsing the stuff they use in their profession. For Michael Jordan, it's sneakers. For Steve Vai or Eddie Van Halen, it's the latest in six-string technology. Bob Brozman is one expert guitar player whose prospects for such commercial spinoffs would seem limited.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Led Kaapana's one-nighter at McCabe's on Sunday night was a friendly, informal opportunity to hear one of the most talented members of the current generation of Hawaiian slack key guitar players. The performance, especially the duets with steel guitarist Bob Brozman, retained the easygoing, familial atmosphere that is an essential characteristic of Hawaiian music. Slack key is a method of tuning the instrument's strings to an open chord, creating the potential for rich harmonic strumming.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We've heard of blues in the night, but John (Juke) Logan will play blues in the morning on Sunday at the Hard Rock Cafe in Fashion Island in Newport Beach after the annual "Run for Cover" benefit footraces. The harmonica player and organ whiz from L.A. (he's the guy who can be heard blowing sprightly harp during interludes on the "Roseanne" TV show) is expected to start playing around 9 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop music highlights, in chronological order: * Bob Brozman, Shade Tree Stringed Instruments, Laguna Niguel (Jan. 10): This acoustic folk-blues player from Northern California wrote the book on steel-bodied guitars ("The History & Artistry of National Resonator Instruments"), but his performances are based on wit, not pedantry. * John Doe, Club 369, Fullerton (Jan. 10): X, the cornerstone band of L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Martin Simpson must feel like a pinball right about now. Though hardly a household name, the bluesy, folk-based guitarist ricochets around the world. Before participating in last weekend's International Music Products Assn. convention in Los Angeles, Simpson had just returned from a weeklong stint at the Celtic Connections Festival in Glasgow, Scotland.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the scraggliest-looking guitar aces have one thing in common with the famous bruisers of the pro sports world: They get paid for endorsing the stuff they use in their profession. For Michael Jordan, it's sneakers. For Steve Vai or Eddie Van Halen, it's the latest in six-string technology. Bob Brozman is one expert guitar player whose prospects for such commercial spinoffs would seem limited.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a time of ferment on the Orange County club scene, as promoters seek to launch new venues for original music. Johnnie Liddi, an Orange-based independent promoter, says he will try to establish the Kono Hawaii, a 600-capacity nightclub in Santa Ana, as a home for a variety of pop styles. The 26-year-old promoter says he will start Feb. 9 with a bill of local alternative rockers: the Swamp Zombies, A Sight Unseen and the Ziggins.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ivan Lins is not exactly one of the most familiar names in the opening day lineup of the Playboy Jazz Festival on June 12 at the Hollywood Bowl. He is, after all, on a bill that also includes such high-profile American jazz artists as Grover Washington Jr., Joshua Redman, Dianne Reeves and Hendricks & Ross. But with the exception of Antonio Carlos Jobim, no Brazilian singer-composer is regarded with more affection and admiration in the jazz community.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|