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Bob Dylan

ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2009 | Associated Press
Long before he became famous for such tunes as "Blowin' in the Wind," Bob Dylan's social consciousness and artistry were evident in a poem he penned about a little dog who met a tragic end. Dylan was just 16 -- and still going by his given name Bob Zimmerman -- when he wrote "Little Buddy" in the summer of 1957 for the newspaper at Herzl Camp in Webster, Wis. Now the poem is being offered for sale at a Christie's auction, where it is expected to sell for $10,000 to $15,000 on June 23.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Bob Dylan "Tempest" Columbia 3 stars Not to be morbid, but every time I take a day off or leave for vacation, I say a little prayer for the health of Bob Dylan. So large is his presence on generations of American music fans that when his heart strikes its final beat, encapsulating his body of work will require so much sorting and brainpower that the pressure to produce big thoughts on such a towering figure will no doubt overwhelm the Internet - and my ability to process his enormous influence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
A trove of two dozen unfinished Bob Dylan songs written circa 1967 during his “Basement Tapes” period is being completed by an all-star band assembled by producer T Bone Burnett and including Elvis Costello, Marcus Mumford and My Morning Jacket's Jim James for release as an album and Showtime special later this year. “These are not B-level Dylan lyrics,” Burnett, 66, said Monday during a break in filming and recording sessions in Hollywood for the project titled “Lost on the River: The New Basement Tapes.” “They're lyrics he just never got around to finishing.” Rounding out the band working on the new material are Carolina Chocolate Drops singer Rhiannon Giddens and Dawes lead guitarist and songwriter Taylor Goldsmith, all of whom are being treated as peers on the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Well, it took only 48 years, but Bob Dylan and his camp have finally come up with an official music video for “Like A Rolling Stone.” His breakthrough was a 1965 hit that gave him his first Top 10 single while shattering the rules for what was acceptable on AM Top 40 radio at the time. With its dazzling display of lyric wizardry and driving blues-rock backing - Dylan had recently and controversially "gone electric" - and clocking in at a full six minutes in an age when radio hits rarely ran more than three, “Like A Rolling Stone” played a key role in the evolution of pop music from sheer entertainment into a bona fide art form.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- The White House has announced this year's recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. The list of 13 honorees includes musician Bob Dylan, writer Toni Morrison, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and Shimon Peres. "These extraordinary honorees come from different backgrounds and different walks of life, but each of them has made a lasting contribution to the life of our nation," President Obama said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Noblesville, Indiana -- During a musical interlude early in his set Friday night, Bob Dylan faced the audience and playfully shook his shoulders, prompting a gleeful eruption from the thousand who had gathered at the Klipsch Center, an outdoor venue carved out of fields about a half hour north of Indianapolis. It was the first and only time the musical legend would interact with the crowd. When Dylan takes the stage these days, he doesn't speak, doesn't gesture and certainly doesn't banter.
NATIONAL
May 30, 2012 | By Ian Duncan, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama pinned the Presidential Medal of Freedom around Bob Dylan's neck as the singer stood in the White House inscrutable in black sunglasses. "I have to say that I am a really big fan," Obama said as he introduced Dylan, one of a number of figures from the struggles and accomplishments of the 1960s, as well as other eras, whom Obama chose to honor Tuesday. Labor leader and civil rights campaigner Dolores Huerta and astronaut John Glenn also received the medal.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
On July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan stepped onstage at the Newport Folk Festival, plugged in an electric guitar and changed the course of pop music history. The performance caused a furious reaction. The crowd booed loudly, and folk icon Pete Seeger tried to stop the show. Dylan and his band retreated after three songs, coming back to play an acoustic set. Still, Dylan's provocative move has long been pointed to as a key moment when electric rock music eclipsed folk as the sound of the '60s generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Bob Dylan and counterterrorism? Say what? It may sound like an odd pairing, but that's exactly what Cinemax is giving us with the new season of "Strike Back," the channel's series about a stealth counterterrorism unit crossing the globe to squelch threats. For the second season, debuting Aug. 17, two brand-new Bob Dylan songs will be featured. The first song, "Early Roman Kings," premieres Thursday on Cinemax, HBO and cinemax.com. The video for the song will feature scenes from the new season starring Philip Winchester, Sullivan Stapleton, Rhashan Stone and Michelle Lukes.
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