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Bob Edwards

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NEWS
July 29, 2004 | From a Times staff writer
After being bumped from the National Public Radio show he'd hosted for 24 years, Bob Edwards is moving to satellite radio, NPR reported Wednesday. Edwards, the former host of "Morning Edition," has agreed to host a new morning show on the XM Satellite Radio system, NPR said. The deal has not yet been formally announced and a launch date was not disclosed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2010 | By Steve Carney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Madeleine Brand was named co-host of National Public Radio's "Day to Day" in 2006, the newsmagazine was the network's fastest-growing show. The Los Angeles native had joined a small coterie of NPR hosts that included public-radio icons such as Bob Edwards, Linda Wertheimer and Brand's mentor, Susan Stamberg. "I felt like I was joining this august company but that they had given me the freedom to update it," Brand said. "And then … they didn't. " In 2009 NPR canceled the program, a victim of the recession.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2004 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Bob Edwards, whose deep, smooth baritone has been the first voice that millions of National Public Radio listeners have awakened to for 25 years, is being replaced on "Morning Edition" at the end of April, the network announced Tuesday. When asked about the change, Edwards said, "I wish there were no change." "I was there from Day One. That's quite an investment," he said. "I guess some of us have to be dragged off." Edwards, 56, has hosted the show since it premiered Nov. 5, 1979.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
In his old job, management told him what to do and then demoted him after 30 years of service. But he did have 13 million loyal listeners and a pension plan. In his new job, he is with a station that has maybe 5 million listeners and he has no pension. But he has his own show, with his name on it, and management treats him like a star.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Bob Edwards is one father who is home when his kids troop in from school each afternoon. He is also one of the few men whose 4-year-old daughter tucks him in for the night. Well, at least for part of the night. For 10 years now, Edwards has retired for the evening at 7 so he can climb out of bed at 1:30 a.m. each weekday to host "Morning Edition," National Public Radio's two-hour morning news program, which celebrates its 10th birthday Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1986
Edy Williams' "still" would not be free, but rather drastically overpriced, if it costs me 22 cents to write for it. BOB EDWARDS Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004
With Ruth Seymour's firing of Sandra Tsing Loh at KCRW-FM and now Bob Edwards' demotion at NPR's "Morning Edition" ("Stormy Days for NPR," by Allan M. Jalon and Steve Carney, March 29), it appears that public radio is running out of feet to shoot. Lon M. Burns Manhattan Beach
OPINION
March 29, 2004
Re "All Things Weren't Considered," Commentary, March 26: Bravo to Linda Ellerbee for telling it like it is. It's bad enough when television personalities are put out to pasture, but ageism in radio? Shame on National Public Radio. Carol Hirsch Los Angeles Ellerbee, who champions causes for the young even as she ages (gracefully), said what many of us were thinking: Bob Edwards represents the best in broadcast radio. Lose him, NPR, and you lose my confidence, as well as my contribution.
SPORTS
January 21, 1988
Mike Edwards of Valencia High School has made an oral commitment to attend the University of Utah. Edwards' decision was based on assurances from Utah's football coaches that he could participate in football and baseball, said Bob Edwards, his father. "Mike had been looking at Arizona State, USC and Colorado, also," Bob Edwards said. "But the others shied away from the baseball, and Utah thought it was great."
NEWS
July 29, 2004 | From a Times staff writer
After being bumped from the National Public Radio show he'd hosted for 24 years, Bob Edwards is moving to satellite radio, NPR reported Wednesday. Edwards, the former host of "Morning Edition," has agreed to host a new morning show on the XM Satellite Radio system, NPR said. The deal has not yet been formally announced and a launch date was not disclosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2004 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Bob Edwards, one of radio's consummate interviewers, has found himself in his final days as host of National Public Radio's "Morning Edition" in the awkward position of subject rather than questioner. "I'm sick and tired of that, frankly," said Edwards, who today ends a 24-year tenure at the helm of NPR's most popular show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004
With Ruth Seymour's firing of Sandra Tsing Loh at KCRW-FM and now Bob Edwards' demotion at NPR's "Morning Edition" ("Stormy Days for NPR," by Allan M. Jalon and Steve Carney, March 29), it appears that public radio is running out of feet to shoot. Lon M. Burns Manhattan Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004 | Jonathan Taylor
With the tally of e-mails to National Public Radio objecting to the public broadcaster's reassignment of longtime "Morning Edition" anchor Bob Edwards now upwards of 23,000, NPR launched a two-pronged damage control campaign this week. NPR-affiliated stations -- including Pasadena-based KPCC-FM (89.3), which ends its spring fundraising drive today -- sent their members a plea from Edwards to continue contributing.
OPINION
March 29, 2004
Re "All Things Weren't Considered," Commentary, March 26: Bravo to Linda Ellerbee for telling it like it is. It's bad enough when television personalities are put out to pasture, but ageism in radio? Shame on National Public Radio. Carol Hirsch Los Angeles Ellerbee, who champions causes for the young even as she ages (gracefully), said what many of us were thinking: Bob Edwards represents the best in broadcast radio. Lose him, NPR, and you lose my confidence, as well as my contribution.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2004 | Allan M. Jalon and Steve Carney, Special to The Times
The outwardly ordered world of National Public Radio has been upended as station managers, editorial writers and more than 13,000 listeners have reacted with anger and confusion to last week's announcement that the network was removing the highly popular Bob Edwards as host of its flagship show, "Morning Edition," as of April 30.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004 | Jonathan Taylor
With the tally of e-mails to National Public Radio objecting to the public broadcaster's reassignment of longtime "Morning Edition" anchor Bob Edwards now upwards of 23,000, NPR launched a two-pronged damage control campaign this week. NPR-affiliated stations -- including Pasadena-based KPCC-FM (89.3), which ends its spring fundraising drive today -- sent their members a plea from Edwards to continue contributing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1986
An Escondido woman pleaded no contest Wednesday to a misdemeanor charge of child abandonment for leaving her 1-day-old child in a minister's car. Jodie Marie Edwards, 32, could be ordered to serve one year in County Jail and fined $1,000 at her sentencing April 23. Her attorney, Rena Margolis, told Judge William B. Draper Jr. that she will ask for probation. Edwards, a mother of five, appeared calm during the hearing. Draper allowed her to remain free on her own recognizance.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2004
Let's see if I understand this latest public radio folly. NPR is replacing the founding host of "Morning Edition" just before that show has its 25th anniversary ["NPR Changes Key Host," Mar. 24]. The average weekly listener audience is the second highest in the nation, the highest in listener-sponsored public radio. According to the writer of the article, Steve Carney, "Replacing Edwards is probably NPR's biggest personnel change and challenge yet." So, NPR is just looking for a new challenge?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2004 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Bob Edwards, whose deep, smooth baritone has been the first voice that millions of National Public Radio listeners have awakened to for 25 years, is being replaced on "Morning Edition" at the end of April, the network announced Tuesday. When asked about the change, Edwards said, "I wish there were no change." "I was there from Day One. That's quite an investment," he said. "I guess some of us have to be dragged off." Edwards, 56, has hosted the show since it premiered Nov. 5, 1979.
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