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Bob Hamelin

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SPORTS
June 23, 1989 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, Times Staff Writer
Bo played here. So did Jim Eisenreich, Charlie Lea and Tim Wallach. And don't forget Elvis. After all, he was the King. Nestled along the banks of the mighty, muddy Mississippi River, Memphis always has provided a fertile proving ground for talented young performers. Young men with major league aspirations and talent to match pour forth from the town like the soulful sounds of the blues bands on another festive Friday night down on Beale Street. The latest player ready to emerge is a 6-foot-1, 230-pound slugger the denizens have taken to calling "Hammer."
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SPORTS
June 11, 1999 | DIANE PUCIN
The life-changing decision was not made by Bob Hamelin after hours of soul-searching angst. It did not come to him as if in a cartoon, where a light bulb appears over a head. And it did not happen after long, soulful conversations with a wife, parent or coach. No, this life-changing decision was made by Hamelin suddenly and strangely, in a way that both frightened and exhilarated him.
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SPORTS
January 4, 1991 | TOM HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Try and imagine the frustration of Bob Hamelin, a top prospect for the Kansas City Royals. For two years, Hamelin, 23, has lived with a nagging backache. He couldn't stand up or sit down without pain. Doctors in Memphis told him to lose weight. Doctors in Omaha advised him to exercise. Doctors in Kansas City suggested he take a long rest. It seemed as if everybody had a remedy, but the pain persisted.
SPORTS
June 12, 1995 | Associated Press
Bob Hamelin, unable to find the stroke that made him the American League rookie of the year in 1994 with the Kansas City Royals, was sent down to triple-A Omaha. Hamelin was batting .175 with two home runs and nine runs batted in when he was benched two weeks ago. * Danny Jackson, 0-7 for the St. Louis Cardinals, was placed on the 15-day disabled list. Jackson, who underwent surgery in January for a cancerous thyroid, will receive treatment and therapy aimed at improving his stamina.
SPORTS
June 21, 1988
Coaches for the U.S. Olympic baseball team, scheduled to leave Wednesday for a five-game series in Japan, cut two players: catcher Brent Mayne, a sophomore at Cal State Fullerton, and infielder Bob Hamelin, a sophomore at Rancho Santiago Community College in Santa Ana.
SPORTS
July 20, 1994 | Associated Press
Chicago White Sox catcher Ron Karkovice, Detroit infielder Tony Phillips and Kansas City infielder Bob Hamelin were suspended by the American League for separate incidents. Hamelin was suspended for five games for charging Detroit Tiger pitcher Greg Cadaret on July 15 and starting a brawl. Karkovice and Phillips each was suspended three games for making physical contact with umpires. Karkovice had a run-in with umpire Brian O'Nora on July 8, and Phillips touched umpire Tim Tschida on July 9.
SPORTS
June 12, 1995 | Associated Press
Bob Hamelin, unable to find the stroke that made him the American League rookie of the year in 1994 with the Kansas City Royals, was sent down to triple-A Omaha. Hamelin was batting .175 with two home runs and nine runs batted in when he was benched two weeks ago. * Danny Jackson, 0-7 for the St. Louis Cardinals, was placed on the 15-day disabled list. Jackson, who underwent surgery in January for a cancerous thyroid, will receive treatment and therapy aimed at improving his stamina.
SPORTS
February 5, 1986 | GERALD SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Bob Hamelin, Irvine High School's All-County tackle, has all the markings of a major college football recruit. As a 6-foot 1-inch, 225-pounder, he has speed, size and intelligence (a 3.5 grade point average on a 4.0 scale). But until recently, not a single major college recruiter had offered Hamelin a scholarship. One reason, Hamelin said, is that he also wants to play college baseball; many coaches shy away from two-sport athletes.
SPORTS
March 26, 1986 | PATRICK DUNNE, Times Staff Writer
Bob Hamelin of Irvine High School doesn't understand what all the fuss is about. Sure, he gave up a full scholarship to play football at Notre Dame. But he likes baseball. "It's no big deal," Hamelin said. "I like baseball a lot more than football. I've played it longer and I'm more comfortable with it." And he must have had a baseball scholarship already lined up. Right? Wrong. "There have been no offers that way, either," Hamelin, a first baseman, said.
SPORTS
October 20, 1994 | From Associated Press
Bob Hamelin, who inherited Kansas City's designated hitting job from George Brett after spending six seasons in the minor leagues, was an easy winner Wednesday as American League rookie of the year. Hamelin, a standout at Irvine High, Rancho Santiago and UCLA, was the first designated hitter to win the award, and the first Royal since Lou Piniella in 1969. Hamelin hit 24 home runs, breaking Bo Jackson's Royal rookie record of 22 set in 1987, had 65 runs batted in and was batting .
SPORTS
October 20, 1994 | From Associated Press
Bob Hamelin, who inherited Kansas City's designated hitting job from George Brett after spending six seasons in the minor leagues, was an easy winner Wednesday as American League rookie of the year. Hamelin, a standout at Irvine High, Rancho Santiago and UCLA, was the first designated hitter to win the award, and the first Royal since Lou Piniella in 1969. Hamelin hit 24 home runs, breaking Bo Jackson's Royal rookie record of 22 set in 1987, had 65 runs batted in and was batting .
SPORTS
August 11, 1994 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Hamelin is no ordinary rookie. The statistics that go up in lights when the Kansas City designated hitter steps to the plate tell you that. Emphatically. But look at him, pushing 27, with a bat and a belly and a No. 3 on his back that inevitably leads people to call him the Babe. Where's the rookie in a guy who shuffles around the clubhouse in shower shoes with an air that says he's seen it all, and it's not half bad?
SPORTS
July 20, 1994 | Associated Press
Chicago White Sox catcher Ron Karkovice, Detroit infielder Tony Phillips and Kansas City infielder Bob Hamelin were suspended by the American League for separate incidents. Hamelin was suspended for five games for charging Detroit Tiger pitcher Greg Cadaret on July 15 and starting a brawl. Karkovice and Phillips each was suspended three games for making physical contact with umpires. Karkovice had a run-in with umpire Brian O'Nora on July 8, and Phillips touched umpire Tim Tschida on July 9.
SPORTS
May 30, 1994 | JASON H. REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Hamelin dug into the batter's box, took a few warm-up swings and fixed his eyes on the target. The unlucky recipient of his attention was Angel closer Joe Grahe, and Hamelin, the Kansas City Royals' rookie slugger, waited eagerly to deliver his best shot. The occasion was a game May 19 at Anaheim Stadium; the situation of the late-inning pressure variety. Hamelin led off the ninth for the Royals, who spent most of the previous innings returning quickly from the plate to the dugout.
SPORTS
January 4, 1991 | TOM HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Try and imagine the frustration of Bob Hamelin, a top prospect for the Kansas City Royals. For two years, Hamelin, 23, has lived with a nagging backache. He couldn't stand up or sit down without pain. Doctors in Memphis told him to lose weight. Doctors in Omaha advised him to exercise. Doctors in Kansas City suggested he take a long rest. It seemed as if everybody had a remedy, but the pain persisted.
SPORTS
January 16, 1990 | STEVE KRESAL
Rashone Lewis has shown that he can stay with something until it is accomplished. But he also knows a little something about the alternative--walking away. In the past three years, Lewis, a sophomore at Fullerton College, has had to deal with much more than the average problems of a college basketball player. When Lewis arrived at Cal State Fullerton in 1987, he was academically ineligible. A year later, the coach who recruited him resigned.
SPORTS
May 30, 1994 | JASON H. REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Hamelin dug into the batter's box, took a few warm-up swings and fixed his eyes on the target. The unlucky recipient of his attention was Angel closer Joe Grahe, and Hamelin, the Kansas City Royals' rookie slugger, waited eagerly to deliver his best shot. The occasion was a game May 19 at Anaheim Stadium; the situation of the late-inning pressure variety. Hamelin led off the ninth for the Royals, who spent most of the previous innings returning quickly from the plate to the dugout.
SPORTS
June 11, 1999 | DIANE PUCIN
The life-changing decision was not made by Bob Hamelin after hours of soul-searching angst. It did not come to him as if in a cartoon, where a light bulb appears over a head. And it did not happen after long, soulful conversations with a wife, parent or coach. No, this life-changing decision was made by Hamelin suddenly and strangely, in a way that both frightened and exhilarated him.
SPORTS
June 23, 1989 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, Times Staff Writer
Bo played here. So did Jim Eisenreich, Charlie Lea and Tim Wallach. And don't forget Elvis. After all, he was the King. Nestled along the banks of the mighty, muddy Mississippi River, Memphis always has provided a fertile proving ground for talented young performers. Young men with major league aspirations and talent to match pour forth from the town like the soulful sounds of the blues bands on another festive Friday night down on Beale Street. The latest player ready to emerge is a 6-foot-1, 230-pound slugger the denizens have taken to calling "Hammer."
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