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Bob Hope Classic Golf Tournament

SPORTS
January 25, 2004 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
It's a flat-out sprint to the finish line at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, which so far has amounted to an exercise in golf course torture. But with 72 holes down and 18 more to go, is there anything out there that can quiet all the good vibes? The short answer: Probably not. The longer answer is that as long as there is a chance for someone to shoot a score so low it's borderline subterranean, anything looks possible.
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SPORTS
January 24, 2004 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
This will not be good news for a lot of people. Phil Mickelson is healthy, he has lost weight and he's excited about playing. More important, he's keeping his golf ball on the fairway. What's more, his putts are falling so quickly into the bottoms of the holes, the balls must be allergic to grass. So far at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, it's a brand new year for a brand new man, and Mickelson is celebrating like crazy.
SPORTS
January 23, 2004 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
The second round of the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic went a lot like the first: They came, they saw, they torched the place. Kenny Perry followed up his 64 at Indian Wells Country Club with a 66 Thursday at the Palmer Course at PGA West and is 14 under par through 36 holes. That amounts to two touchdowns and two extra points worth of birdies, not to mention a one-shot lead. Phil Mickelson delivered a 63 to Indian Wells, which once again assumed the role as favored whipping boy of the pro golf set.
SPORTS
January 22, 2004 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
A golfer must do two things to have a chance at winning the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic: shoot a low opening score, then continue shooting low scores. Skip Kendall and Mark Hensby took care of the first step Wednesday, carding nine-under-par 63s in a first round that started in wind and rain but quickly settled into pristine desert conditions. Kendall and Hensby have a one-shot lead over Kenny Perry and are two ahead of Justin Leonard, Jerry Kelly and Jay Haas.
SPORTS
February 3, 2003 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
In his first tournament of the year, Phil Mickelson said he couldn't have hit his driver much worse or scored much better, which added up to a season debut less frustrating than it was promising. Mickelson, the defending champion, closed with a five-under-par 67 Sunday and moved from a tie for 33rd to a tie for sixth at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic.
SPORTS
January 30, 2003 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Stephen Ames started adding it up. He shot a nine-under-par 63 Wednesday at the Palmer Course at PGA West to start the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic and now, if he could only do that four more times, that's, what, 45 under? That could even be enough to win. "Easily," said Ames, who is tied for the first-round lead with Bob Tway. "But I suspect they might get to 40 under this year, the way things are going." Get your compass out.
SPORTS
January 29, 2003 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
So, David Duval, about last year, was that a disaster for you or what? "It looked like a little bit of a meltdown," he said. "It looked like a complete failure." But it also depends on who is doing the looking, Duval said. "I'm 31 years old, I've been out here nine years, I've won 13 times, I've won a major, I've been on a winning Ryder Cup team, I've won a money title, I've been ranked No.
SPORTS
February 14, 2001 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's time for roll call at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, where David Duval, Fred Couples, Justin Leonard and Jose Maria Olazabal are among the headliners who will tee it up in the 90-hole event that begins today. Meanwhile, who's not here: Tiger Woods, Davis Love III, Phil Mickelson . . . and now Jesper Parnevik. Woods, Love and Mickelson didn't put the Hope on their schedules and planned to sit this one out, but Parnevik joined them Tuesday night.
SPORTS
January 24, 2000 | MIKE JAMES, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
There were two golfers in the last two groups who figured to give fourth-round leader Rory Sabbatini a run for first place in Sunday's final round of the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic at Bermuda Dunes Country Club. After all, they had the pedigrees: Jesper Parnevik, sixth in the Mercedes Championships, third in the Sony Open and first in the hearts of anyone who has never managed to dress according to styles of the day; and David Duval, second in the world rankings and golf's new No.
SPORTS
January 19, 2000 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For his first practice round as defending champion of the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, David Duval chose an all-black ensemble, which for once didn't match his mood. Duval has been sort of--how can we put this?--well, prickly, since he got roasted like a Cornish game hen over his stance in last year's Ryder Cup compensation controversy, and his comments about the sorry shape Carnoustie was in for the British Open.
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