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Bob Hope Classic Golf Tournament

SPORTS
January 23, 2006 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Chad Campbell's personality is as dry as a sidewalk in the summer in his hometown of Andrews, Texas, and he still managed to win the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic even though he didn't always keep his golf ball in the same general condition. At the new Classic Club that's splayed out between Interstate 10 and a low-slung ridge of mountains in Palm Desert, there are streams, ponds and lakes that come into play on 13 holes. That's one watered-down desert.
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SPORTS
January 22, 2006 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Because the new Classic Club is where they're playing today's last round of the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, there's always a chance that some players are going to get the wind knocked out of them. Here is what we have learned so far, after four days and 72 holes: If the wind blows in this on-and-off wind tunnel at the Hope's new course in Palm Desert, scores can soar like a bad blood pressure reading; and if it isn't blowing, it's still hard to find a typically low Hope score.
SPORTS
January 21, 2006 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
He hasn't played a regular PGA Tour event in three months, he practiced only six days in the off-season and he didn't play a practice round this week, so how can it be that Phil Mickelson is 13 under par and only six shots off the lead with 36 holes to go at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic?
SPORTS
January 20, 2006 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
If a 72-hole tournament is a sprint, does a 90-hole tournament such as the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic become a marathon? It's more like a math problem, said Chad Campbell, as in the number of birdies you must add up and write down on your scorecard. "I don't know how the scores are going to end up, but always in this tournament, you've got to make a ton of birdies," he said. "It always seems 25 under or 30 under wins here." If he's doing his math properly, Campbell could be halfway there.
SPORTS
January 31, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
He's got a new cap, new clothes and new equipment, and now that he has won the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, it's nothing less than a brand new start for Justin Leonard. At 33, Leonard isn't exactly a kid anymore, even if his sheepish grin and baby-faced looks say otherwise, but when you are coming off the worst year of your career and you change pretty much everything about the way you do business, there could be some questions hanging in the air. Questions such as ...
SPORTS
January 31, 2005 | J.A. Adande
Position is the key to sports. Field position, pole position, low-post position, runners in scoring position. Same thing in life. It's not too hard to predict who will have the better night: the person outside the ropes at the club, or the person in the VIP room. It's all about position. Joe Ogilvie had it Sunday morning.
SPORTS
January 30, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
It's a marathon (90 holes), it's an endurance test (four rounds with amateurs) and it's a math quiz (how many birdies does it take to win?), but whatever you call the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, you could also call it a coming-out party for Joe Ogilvie if can hold on for his first PGA Tour victory. Last year at New Orleans, Ogilvie led by four shots going into the last round, shot a four-under 68 and still lost by a shot when Vijay Singh threw a 63 at everybody.
SPORTS
January 29, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
It remained the Joe Ogilvie show Friday at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic in La Quinta, but some players were gaining on him, one of them a portly 51-year-old with a bushy, gray mustache you could hang a swing on, who moves as deliberately as a walrus and looks enough like one to answer to the name. Yes, it's Craig Stadler, the Walrus, the winner of the 1980 Hope when he was 12 under par through four rounds, or close to what the cut probably will be tonight.
SPORTS
January 28, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
He lists Warren Buffett and Bill Gates among his heroes, so it's obvious that Joe Ogilvie knows something about investment strategy, even as it relates this week to the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic. Maybe the best idea is to put a little something away for when you really need it, possibly some birdies, sometime Sunday afternoon. "Unless you're up by 13, which is almost impossible, no lead is safe here," Ogilvie said.
SPORTS
January 27, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
There's no place for the slow, the weak and the faint of birdie at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic. That familiar approach was embraced once more in Wednesday's first round, when 128 players made 609 birdies, laid waste to par, then went to sleep and dreamed about doing it all over again. It's five spins around a fast track and the best way to handle this event is never to look back over your shoulder because some people, probably a lot of people, are already passing you.
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