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Bob Iger

NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
The eternal problem with Tomorrowland is that the commonplace reality of today inevitably catches up to and ultimately surpasses the ultramodern imagined future of yesterday. Disneyland's forward-looking land of tomorrow has seen many evolutions since opening day in 1955. Through the years, there have been major expansions in 1959 (Monorail), 1977 (Space Mountain) and 1986 (Star Tours) as well as complete makeovers in 1967 (New Tomorrowland) and 1998 (New New Tomorrowland). The current iteration has a retro-futuristic science fiction fantasy theme that was designed to be a bit more timeless but nonetheless is showing its age. Photos: Top 10 Tomorrowland rides of the past With the release of "Iron Man 3" and plans for "Star Wars" and "Tron" sequels in the works, I thought it would be a good time to do a bit of "blue sky" dreaming about what Walt Disney Imagineering might have in mind for the New New New Tomorrowland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Pixar Animation Studios has laid off an undisclosed number of people at its Emeryville, Calif., headquarters due to the delay of its forthcoming film "The Good Dinosaur. " The layoffs affect less than 5% of the company's 1,200-person workforce, according to a source close to the studio. In September, "The Good Dinosaur" was pushed back from its original release date of May 30, 2014, to Nov. 25, 2015. About a month before the project was delayed, the studio, a unit of Walt Disney Studios, removed  director Bob Peterson from the project.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2006
Regarding "Pixar's Creative Chief to Have Special Power at Disney: Greenlighting Movies," Jan. 27: Why didn't Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Bob Iger just steal John Lasseter away from Pixar Animation Studios and set him up in his own shop? I guarantee it would have cost the shareholders far less than $7 billion. Jon Crowley Sherman Oaks
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Meg James
Walt Disney Co. has hired a new advertising agency to oversee media planning for its movie studio. OMD, whose clients include Pepsi and Visa, on Wednesday landed the Disney Studios account, which handles an estimated $800 million a year in advertising spending, according to sources familiar with the matter. It is a major coup for OMD, which has a large Los Angeles office that handles its Nissan and Wells Fargo accounts. Publicis Groupe's 4D agency lost the Disney account.
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
The brief announcement that Disney plans to add a Marvel-themed land to Hong Kong Disneyland in 2017 raises a host of questions: Will Iron Man, Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four and the X-Men be getting their own rides? When will the Marvel characters be coming to Anaheim, Paris, Tokyo or Shanghai? And why, of all places, Hong Kong? Many of the most basic questions remain unanswered, in part because the announcement was made by a Hong Kong government official rather than Disney.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
In a year when Bank of America's stock plunged 58% and the company announced plans to lay off 30,000 employees, chief executive Brian Moynihan's compensation package more than quadrupled to nearly $8.1 million. Here's why: In 2011, the Charlotte, N.C.-based bank recorded $1.4 billion in profit after losing $2.2 billion the year before. So far this year, the stock is up more than 70%. So although the bank's compensation and benefits committee kept Moynihan's salary the same at $950,000, he also landed $6.1 million in performance-reliant stock.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Joe Flint
CBS is home to "Two Broke Girls" and one rich chief executive. Leslie Moonves, the CEO of CBS, had a 2012 compensation package valued at $62.2 million, according to the company's proxy statement filed Friday. Although that makes Moonves the highest-compensated media chief executive, it is also a decline from 2011, when his pay package was worth almost $70 million. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments Moonves had a base salary of $3.5 million and received a bonus of $27 million.
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