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August 14, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Bob Lee, president of the IBF, said there is no truth to charges that in 1981 he received $3,000 from an undercover FBI informant. A day earlier, Lee invoked the Fifth Amendment before a Senate subcommittee. Lee exercised his right to refuse questions after the subcommittee's ranking minority member, Sen. William Roth (R-Del.), raised allegations that Lee accepted the cash for then-New Jersey Athletic Commissioner Jersey Joe Walcott.
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SPORTS
August 18, 2000 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the clean knockout federal prosecutors had hoped for, but they still won a solid decision Thursday when a jury found International Boxing Federation founder and former president Bob Lee guilty on six of 38 counts in a New Jersey racketeering trial. The 66-year-old Lee, charged with taking $338,000 in bribes from promoters and managers to fix rankings and sanction fights, was found guilty of tax evasion, money laundering and interstate travel in aid of racketeering.
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SPORTS
December 16, 1999 | DAVID WHARTON
The embattled president of the International Boxing Federation and his son were hit with more legal trouble Wednesday when a federal grand jury indicted them for failing to report bribes on their tax returns. Bob Lee Sr. faces six counts of filing false tax returns over the last six years. His son, Bob Jr., faces one count from 1995. The charges were added to 32 counts filed against the Lees and other IBF officials last month. Prosecutors allege that the East Orange, N.J.
SPORTS
March 24, 2000 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Attorney General's office, at the request of the California State Athletic Commission, has launched an investigation of boxing promoter Bob Arum, based on Arum's sworn statement that he made improper payments to the International Boxing Federation in 1995. Although it appears unlikely, Deputy Attorney General Earl Plowman wouldn't rule out the possibility that his action could jeopardize the Oscar De La Hoya-Shane Mosley welterweight title fight June 17 at Staples Center.
SPORTS
March 24, 2000 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Attorney General's office, at the request of the California State Athletic Commission, has launched an investigation of boxing promoter Bob Arum, based on Arum's sworn statement that he made improper payments to the International Boxing Federation in 1995. Although it appears unlikely, Deputy Attorney General Earl Plowman wouldn't rule out the possibility that his action could jeopardize the Oscar De La Hoya-Shane Mosley welterweight title fight June 17 at Staples Center.
SPORTS
August 18, 2000 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the clean knockout federal prosecutors had hoped for, but they still won a solid decision Thursday when a jury found International Boxing Federation founder and former president Bob Lee guilty on six of 38 counts in a New Jersey racketeering trial. The 66-year-old Lee, charged with taking $338,000 in bribes from promoters and managers to fix rankings and sanction fights, was found guilty of tax evasion, money laundering and interstate travel in aid of racketeering.
SPORTS
November 5, 1999 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The troubled sport of boxing suffered another black eye Thursday when the president of the International Boxing Federation and three of his top executives were indicted on federal racketeering charges, accused of taking bribes to fix rankings. Bob Lee Sr. and the key executives--including his son, Bob Jr.--received $338,000 in illegal payments from promoters and managers over a 13-year period, the U.S. attorney's office in Newark, N.J., said.
SPORTS
November 23, 1999 | From Associated Press
Contending that the IBF is corrupt, federal prosecutors Monday asked a judge to appoint an overseer for one of boxing's major governing bodies. The monitor would replace IBF President Robert Lee Sr., who was indicted this month on criminal bribery charges. A civil racketeering lawsuit filed Monday against the IBF seeks to ban Lee and his criminal co-defendants from boxing.
SPORTS
January 11, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal court judge ruled Monday that he would unseal some of the government's evidence against Robert Lee Sr., president of the International Boxing Federation, who stands accused of accepting bribes to fix rankings. Responding to a motion by the Los Angeles Times, U.S. District Judge John W. Bissell said he would review documents, audio- and videotapes to determine which will be released. Bissell said he may engage in a "balancing effort" to withhold material that could harm innocent people.
SPORTS
November 30, 1990
Super-flyweight champion Johnny Tapia tested positive for cocaine nearly three weeks after his Oct. 26 title fight, but was not tested as required immediately after the bout, authorities said. Bob Lee, International Boxing Federation president, said it's unlikely Tapia would be stripped of his USBA title because the test was taken more than two weeks after his Albuquerque fight against Santiago Caballero of Venezuela.
SPORTS
January 11, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal court judge ruled Monday that he would unseal some of the government's evidence against Robert Lee Sr., president of the International Boxing Federation, who stands accused of accepting bribes to fix rankings. Responding to a motion by the Los Angeles Times, U.S. District Judge John W. Bissell said he would review documents, audio- and videotapes to determine which will be released. Bissell said he may engage in a "balancing effort" to withhold material that could harm innocent people.
SPORTS
December 16, 1999 | DAVID WHARTON
The embattled president of the International Boxing Federation and his son were hit with more legal trouble Wednesday when a federal grand jury indicted them for failing to report bribes on their tax returns. Bob Lee Sr. faces six counts of filing false tax returns over the last six years. His son, Bob Jr., faces one count from 1995. The charges were added to 32 counts filed against the Lees and other IBF officials last month. Prosecutors allege that the East Orange, N.J.
SPORTS
November 23, 1999 | From Associated Press
Contending that the IBF is corrupt, federal prosecutors Monday asked a judge to appoint an overseer for one of boxing's major governing bodies. The monitor would replace IBF President Robert Lee Sr., who was indicted this month on criminal bribery charges. A civil racketeering lawsuit filed Monday against the IBF seeks to ban Lee and his criminal co-defendants from boxing.
SPORTS
November 5, 1999 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The troubled sport of boxing suffered another black eye Thursday when the president of the International Boxing Federation and three of his top executives were indicted on federal racketeering charges, accused of taking bribes to fix rankings. Bob Lee Sr. and the key executives--including his son, Bob Jr.--received $338,000 in illegal payments from promoters and managers over a 13-year period, the U.S. attorney's office in Newark, N.J., said.
SPORTS
August 14, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Bob Lee, president of the IBF, said there is no truth to charges that in 1981 he received $3,000 from an undercover FBI informant. A day earlier, Lee invoked the Fifth Amendment before a Senate subcommittee. Lee exercised his right to refuse questions after the subcommittee's ranking minority member, Sen. William Roth (R-Del.), raised allegations that Lee accepted the cash for then-New Jersey Athletic Commissioner Jersey Joe Walcott.
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