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February 15, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
"Jazz," Bob Wilber said between sets at the annual San Diego Jazz Party Saturday night, "is now an international language. It's no longer an American monopoly." Wilber, who is 61, was born and raised in Scarsdale, N.Y., but he and his wife, singer Joanne Horton, now make their home in the English countryside, in the ancient Cotswold market town of Chipping Campden. When he was 17, Wilber studied with Sidney Bechet, who practically invented the soprano saxophone as a jazz instrument.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is a regular contributor to Westside/Valley Calendar
Bob Wilber's got one foot in tomorrow and the other in yesterday. Fast approaching his 65th birthday (March 15), the busy saxophonist and composer has always seemed a little out of sync with his generation. Given the opportunity to make a quantum leap through time, he probably would elect to re-emerge in the late '20s as a member of Louis Armstrong's classic Hot Five.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
"Jazz," Bob Wilber said between sets at the annual San Diego Jazz Party Saturday night, "is now an international language. It's no longer an American monopoly." Wilber, who is 61, was born and raised in Scarsdale, N.Y., but he and his wife, singer Joanne Horton, now make their home in the English countryside, in the ancient Cotswold market town of Chipping Campden. When he was 17, Wilber studied with Sidney Bechet, who practically invented the soprano saxophone as a jazz instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is a regular contributor to Westside/Valley Calendar
Bob Wilber's got one foot in tomorrow and the other in yesterday. Fast approaching his 65th birthday (March 15), the busy saxophonist and composer has always seemed a little out of sync with his generation. Given the opportunity to make a quantum leap through time, he probably would elect to re-emerge in the late '20s as a member of Louis Armstrong's classic Hot Five.
NEWS
March 30, 1994
Tommy Benford, 88, jazz drummer who backed such legends as Fats Waller and Jelly Roll Morton. A native of Charleston, W. Va., Benford started playing in an orphanage band and for six decades wandered the world performing in a long list of jazz bands. His work included some of Morton's greatest recordings, including "Kansas City Stomp" and "Shreveport."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2009
I couldn't care less that the Jazz Bakery is moving ["Jazz Bakery in Play," by Chris Barton, May 30]. I used to visit the place regularly when they featured mainstream musicians like Scott Hamilton, Ken Peplowski and Bob Wilber who played melodious songs written by qualified professional composers like Gershwin, Porter, Ellington, Arlen and Rodgers and Hart. I stopped going to the Jazz Bakery when its featured musicians spent practically the entire evening playing their "original compositions," usually an irritating array of tuneless, cacophonous numbers created to show the audience how many notes they can play in less than a minute.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How do you separate fact from legend, authenticity from dramatic impact, in filming a movie based on an actual life? The answer is not entirely clarified in "Bix: An Interpretation of a Legend," which purports to tell the story of Leon Bix Beiderbecke (1903-1931). An Italian/U.S. production, it was directed and co-written by Pupi Avati and shot partly on location in Davenport, Iowa (Beiderbecke's home town), and other American locations. That Beiderbecke was a genius can hardly be disputed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1994 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a palace revolution earlier this year that ousted Chuck Conklin, the founding artistic director of the Los Angeles Classic Jazz Festival, there was speculation about the new philosophy guiding the four-day event's musical makeup. The incoming director, trumpeter Bob Allen, plays in Chris Kelly's Black and White Jazz Band, and the rumors were of a shift back from mainstream toward a preponderance of traditional groups.
TRAVEL
July 27, 1986 | LAWRENCE LESLIE
The jazz cruise phenomenon, which began in the mid-1970s with a series of voyages aboard the Rotterdam out of New York, is enjoying a resurgence. The principal events this year will take place on the Norway. Two cruises have been scheduled, leaving Miami Oct. 11 and Oct. 18 respectively. This will be the fourth annual jazz celebration aboard the 70,000-ton liner. This year, in addition to the regular stops at St. Thomas and Nassau, another port of call has been set at St. Maarten.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The thing about jazz is that while it keeps evolving, it never says goodby to the places it's been. There are jazz fans eager to locate the leading edge of experimentation, fascinating rhythms and tonal paths never trod before. Others see no need to move beyond the most primitive of blues, where it all began. But then again, a large number of us grew up on the music that falls somewhere in between--north of late Dixieland but south of early Bop.
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | BETTINA BOXALL and JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writers
At 6 feet 2 and more than 220 pounds, Rickey S. Ross was known by some of his colleagues as "a gentle giant," a religious man and conscientious deputy sheriff who had never been seriously disciplined in his 18 years with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. "He was a very good officer, very well regarded," said a fellow deputy who has known Ross for years. "He was highly religious. Nobody would have ever thought of Rickey Ross. He was well-liked by everyone on the department."
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