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Bobby D Youngblood

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NEWS
April 3, 1987
Orange County officials agreed to pay $375,000 to two former political opponents of Sheriff-Coroner Brad Gates to settle a lawsuit claiming he used the powers of his office to investigate them for political purposes. Former Central Municipal Judge Bobby D. Youngblood and his close political ally, Pat Bland, filed a federal lawsuit three years ago against both Gates and the county.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995 | Staff and Wire Reports
Former Orange County Municipal Judge Bobby D. Youngblood, whose lawsuit against Sheriff Brad Gates for alleged harassment and illegal surveillance ended with a $375,000 settlement, has died. He was 58. Youngblood died at John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital in Indio on Christmas morning, after being taken to the emergency room from his residence in nearby La Quinta, a hospital supervisor said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995 | Staff and Wire Reports
Former Orange County Municipal Judge Bobby D. Youngblood, whose lawsuit against Sheriff Brad Gates for alleged harassment and illegal surveillance ended with a $375,000 settlement, has died. He was 58. Youngblood died at John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital in Indio on Christmas morning, after being taken to the emergency room from his residence in nearby La Quinta, a hospital supervisor said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1990
Dana Parsons' column on Brad Gates ("For Sheriff Who Would Be Sun King, It's All Too Shady," Sept. 30) was like a breath of fresh air to my Sunday morning. I'm glad to learn that I'm not the only human being in Orange County who believes that Gates' lease has run out, that it's time for the people to repossess that office he so ungraciously occupies. As one who recovered damages for Gates' unlawful conduct (in 1987, four others and I received $375,000 due to Gates' unwarranted investigations and harassments)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1990
I see we are being subjected to yet another of the Rev. Louis Sheldon's self-aggrandizing crusades, this one in the matter of the David Wojnarowicz art exhibit. Good Lord, aren't there other, more important things that this self-proclaimed man of God could turn his hyperkinetic energies to? Like the homeless? Or the poor and the hungry? If those aren't exciting enough for the good reverend, how about turning his attention inward, and cleaning up the shameful shambles that organized religion has become under the influences of the Jim Bakkers and the Jimmy Swaggerts?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985
There have been several editorials and letters in reaction to my fining Mr. Alfonso Vasquez 10 cents when he pleaded guilty to violating the City of Orange's "trash rummaging" ordinance. The Times ran an editorial, and one Paul Sins wrote a letter critical of my decision. Mr. Sins either misread The Times article, or misunderstood it, as his characterization of my attitude toward the arresting officers is completely off target. I believed, and still believe, that the politicians who passed the ordinance against "trash-bin scavenging," and those special-interest groups who lobbied for the ordinance, were, in effect, punishing the weak and the poor at the expense of the taxpayer, for the benefit of the rich.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1990
Dana Parsons' column on Brad Gates ("For Sheriff Who Would Be Sun King, It's All Too Shady," Sept. 30) was like a breath of fresh air to my Sunday morning. I'm glad to learn that I'm not the only human being in Orange County who believes that Gates' lease has run out, that it's time for the people to repossess that office he so ungraciously occupies. As one who recovered damages for Gates' unlawful conduct (in 1987, four others and I received $375,000 due to Gates' unwarranted investigations and harassments)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1986 | Mark Landsbaum
For the first time in the organization's history, the Assn. of Orange County Deputy Sheriffs' Political Action Committee has endorsed Sheriff Brad Gates for reelection. Association general manager Robert J. MacLeod said the group's political committee voted to support Gates after interviewing him and his two opponents, Sheriff's Sgt. Linda Lea Calligan and Municipal Judge Bobby D. Youngblood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1986 | David Reyes
Bobby D. Youngblood, who is running for county sheriff, was sued for libel and slander Tuesday by two Sheriff's Department deputies. Lt. Tim Simons and Sgt. Randall Blair, members of the criminal intelligence unit, alleged that Youngblood "maliciously discredited" them when he charged in an April 9, 1985, news conference that both officers supplied cocaine to Youngblood's wife, Cheryl, as part of an attempt to "set up Youngblood." Youngblood, his wife and his attorney, Michael J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1985 | John Needham \f7
Bobby D. Youngblood said Friday that he has begun a leave of absence from his Municipal Court judgeship to run for Orange County sheriff-coroner in next year's election. Youngblood criticized Sheriff-Coroner Brad Gates for deaths that have occurred in the Orange County Jail in recent years and said that if elected he will have a "nationally recognized forensic pathologist" investigate the deaths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1990
I see we are being subjected to yet another of the Rev. Louis Sheldon's self-aggrandizing crusades, this one in the matter of the David Wojnarowicz art exhibit. Good Lord, aren't there other, more important things that this self-proclaimed man of God could turn his hyperkinetic energies to? Like the homeless? Or the poor and the hungry? If those aren't exciting enough for the good reverend, how about turning his attention inward, and cleaning up the shameful shambles that organized religion has become under the influences of the Jim Bakkers and the Jimmy Swaggerts?
NEWS
April 3, 1987
Orange County officials agreed to pay $375,000 to two former political opponents of Sheriff-Coroner Brad Gates to settle a lawsuit claiming he used the powers of his office to investigate them for political purposes. Former Central Municipal Judge Bobby D. Youngblood and his close political ally, Pat Bland, filed a federal lawsuit three years ago against both Gates and the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985
There have been several editorials and letters in reaction to my fining Mr. Alfonso Vasquez 10 cents when he pleaded guilty to violating the City of Orange's "trash rummaging" ordinance. The Times ran an editorial, and one Paul Sins wrote a letter critical of my decision. Mr. Sins either misread The Times article, or misunderstood it, as his characterization of my attitude toward the arresting officers is completely off target. I believed, and still believe, that the politicians who passed the ordinance against "trash-bin scavenging," and those special-interest groups who lobbied for the ordinance, were, in effect, punishing the weak and the poor at the expense of the taxpayer, for the benefit of the rich.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1986 | Mark Landsbaum
Municipal Judge Bobby D. Youngblood, a candidate for county sheriff, has reported spending only $21,931, far less than incumbent Brad Gates, according to campaign finance reports. In a report filed Friday, Youngblood lists $160,328 in contributions since Jan. 1, but $105,000 of it is in "pledges" to his campaign. By contrast, Gates, who is seeking a fourth four-year term, reported spending $177,079 and raising $66,986 since the beginning of the year.
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