Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBobby Short
IN THE NEWS

Bobby Short

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1986 | DON HECKMAN
Looking a good decade or two younger than his 59 years, Bobby Short--a New York City institution--bounced on stage at the Beverly Theatre on Saturday night, fully prepared to prove that there really is something special about Gotham energy. In fact, his rare local appearance gave Angelenos an opportunity to share the real secret of what has kept him young--his nonstop, passionate love affair with the classic songs of Tin Pan Alley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 16, 2007 | John Kenney, John Kenney is a writer in New York.
"Hitler's outward hatred for Jews and Russians may have belied a secret passion for some of their greatest musical works, if a recently discovered cache of records proves to be the remains of his private music collection. The nearly 100 records, now worn and scratched, were stored in the attic of a former Soviet intelligence agent, who left a note saying he took them from the Reich Chancellery after the fall of Berlin in 1945."
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | From Associated Press
The grand piano of late cabaret singer Bobby Short sold for $132,000 in an auction of his personal effects, auction house Christie's said. The piano, a 1971 black lacquer Bechstein kept in Short's Manhattan apartment, had a pre-sale estimate of $30,000 to $40,000. A monogrammed Cartier silver ice bucket sold for $18,000 and an Art Deco wrought iron fire screen brought $12,000, the auction house said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | From Associated Press
The grand piano of late cabaret singer Bobby Short sold for $132,000 in an auction of his personal effects, auction house Christie's said. The piano, a 1971 black lacquer Bechstein kept in Short's Manhattan apartment, had a pre-sale estimate of $30,000 to $40,000. A monogrammed Cartier silver ice bucket sold for $18,000 and an Art Deco wrought iron fire screen brought $12,000, the auction house said.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: The appearance of Bobby Short--a fixture at New York's Cafe Carlyle--at the Wilshire Ebell Theater Wednesday night for a fund-raiser for AIDS Project Los Angeles. Afterward, supper was served in a banquet hall at the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple, converted into a twinkly, candlelit nightclub for the occasion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Bobby Short, the celebrated Manhattan cabaret singer-pianist who reigned at the Cafe Carlyle for more than three decades and became the elegantly clad symbol of a bygone era in classic American popular music, died Monday. He was 80. Short died of leukemia at New York Presbyterian Hospital, said longtime publicist Virginia Wicks. Short, thinking that he had diverticulitis, had gone into the hospital last week, Wicks said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | HOWARD REICH
**** BOBBY SHORT "Piano" Surrounded By Listeners tend to think of Short as the ultimate cabaret singer, but his jazz piano chops are top-notch, as he reaffirms on every track of this beguiling, small-group recording. As if to emphasize the point, Short doesn't sing a note on the first two cuts of "Piano," instead relying on his characteristically poetic keyboard touch and an ability to reshape a melody in more ways than one might imagine.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | Susan King
You didn't have to live through the 1930s, '40s and '50s to recognize these tunes: "My Heart Belongs to Daddy," "I Love Paris," "Too Darn Hot," "Anything Goes," "I Get a Kick Out of You," "Night and Day." They are the witty, sophisticated and romantic handiwork of the beloved Cole Porter, who died in 1964.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1998 | Don Heckman
Think Bobby Short, and the image that comes to mind is an evening in a sophisticated Manhattan bistro, listening to the veteran singer-pianist and his trio in a program rich with Cole Porter songs. There are, indeed, plenty of Porter numbers on this new album, and Short enlivens the set--as he usually does--by including some rarely heard but entrancing introductions and verses to otherwise familiar songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For music fans with a feeling for nostalgia, Tuesday night was like being in Manhattan in, say, 1958. At one end of town, at Catalina Bar & Grill, cabaret singer-pianist Bobby Short was performing with a nine-piece band. To the south, off Venice Boulevard at the Jazz Bakery, Jon Hendricks and Annie Ross were reviving memories of the jazz vocal group Lambert, Hendricks & Ross.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2005 | Matthew Gurewitsch, Special to The Times
IN the Cafe Carlyle, at Madison Avenue level in the luxury hotel of the same name, time used to stand still. At least, so it seemed as long as Bobby Short -- landmark and tourist attraction -- was around to scatter cool, jaunty stardust on Gershwin, Porter or Rodgers and Hart. Short constituted a peculiarly Manhattan phenomenon. His reign at the Carlyle lasted 36 seasons, 20 weeks a year. Last December, at age 80, he was still packing the room. In March, suddenly, the party was over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Bobby Short, the celebrated Manhattan cabaret singer-pianist who reigned at the Cafe Carlyle for more than three decades and became the elegantly clad symbol of a bygone era in classic American popular music, died Monday. He was 80. Short died of leukemia at New York Presbyterian Hospital, said longtime publicist Virginia Wicks. Short, thinking that he had diverticulitis, had gone into the hospital last week, Wicks said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2003
Due to illness, singer Bobby Short has canceled tonight's appearance at the Cerritos Center. Ticketholders will be offered refunds for the concert, which has not been rescheduled.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | HOWARD REICH
**** BOBBY SHORT "Piano" Surrounded By Listeners tend to think of Short as the ultimate cabaret singer, but his jazz piano chops are top-notch, as he reaffirms on every track of this beguiling, small-group recording. As if to emphasize the point, Short doesn't sing a note on the first two cuts of "Piano," instead relying on his characteristically poetic keyboard touch and an ability to reshape a melody in more ways than one might imagine.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For music fans with a feeling for nostalgia, Tuesday night was like being in Manhattan in, say, 1958. At one end of town, at Catalina Bar & Grill, cabaret singer-pianist Bobby Short was performing with a nine-piece band. To the south, off Venice Boulevard at the Jazz Bakery, Jon Hendricks and Annie Ross were reviving memories of the jazz vocal group Lambert, Hendricks & Ross.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bobby Short, whose image as one of the world's finest cabaret artists sometimes obscures his jazz roots, was the guiding light behind the creation of a Duke Ellington sculpture in New York's Central Park. The singer-pianist's affection for Ellington and his music traces back to the late '30s, when Short was a 12-year-old vaudeville performer. He vividly recalls the first time he met his idol. "I was in my manager's office in New York," he says, "and Duke walked in. He was utterly charming.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's around 8 o'clock on Tuesday night, and a parade of limos, Mercedes-Benzes and BMWs is crowding Cahuenga Boulevard near the corner of Hollywood Boulevard. The area's regular population of street denizens watches curiously as the vehicles unload a stream of well-dressed patrons at the front door of the Catalina Bar & Grill. The cafe-society crowd, a rare sight in this funky area of Hollywood, gradually moves inside the club, a venue best known for its presentation of top-level jazz acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last week in New York's Central Park, Bobby Short, perhaps the world's best-known cabaret singer, capped an 18-year effort on behalf of his hero, Duke Ellington, with the unveiling of a memorial statue to the composer-bandleader. "It was a stunning day in New York," Short said from his Manhattan apartment. "There were over a thousand people there to see it. The mayor and two former mayors. Ellington's sister and his granddaughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's around 8 o'clock on Tuesday night, and a parade of limos, Mercedes-Benzes and BMWs is crowding Cahuenga Boulevard near the corner of Hollywood Boulevard. The area's regular population of street denizens watches curiously as the vehicles unload a stream of well-dressed patrons at the front door of the Catalina Bar & Grill. The cafe-society crowd, a rare sight in this funky area of Hollywood, gradually moves inside the club, a venue best known for its presentation of top-level jazz acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1998 | Don Heckman
Think Bobby Short, and the image that comes to mind is an evening in a sophisticated Manhattan bistro, listening to the veteran singer-pianist and his trio in a program rich with Cole Porter songs. There are, indeed, plenty of Porter numbers on this new album, and Short enlivens the set--as he usually does--by including some rarely heard but entrancing introductions and verses to otherwise familiar songs.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|