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Body Mass Index

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HEALTH
March 7, 2011
The body-mass index is a common measure of obesity. It's the ratio of weight in kilograms to height in meters squared. Here's how to calculate yours: (Your weight in kilograms) = (0.4535) x (your weight in pounds) (Your height in meters) = (0.0254) x (your height in inches) (Your BMI) = (your weight in kilograms) / (your height in meters, squared) For adults 20 years old or older, the National Institutes of Health have established these four categories based on BMI levels: Below 18.5underweight 18.5 to 24.9healthy 25.0 to 29.9overweight 30.0 or higherobese ?
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SCIENCE
April 2, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
To maximize your chances of fighting flab, new research offers some simple advice: Wake up early and go outside. People who loaded up on light exposure at the beginning of the day were most likely to have a lower body mass index, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE. That relationship between morning light and BMI was independent of how many calories the study participants consumed. It may sound crazy, but there is sound scientific evidence to back up the link.
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HEALTH
July 25, 2005 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Compare athletes in a sprint event to those running a marathon and it's obvious that a runner's body doesn't take one shape -- sprinters tend to have muscular builds, and distance runners are more wiry. The key to the differences, according to a new research study, may lie in a runner's body mass index. Runners' abilities have long been measured via how much oxygen they can deliver to the muscles, but that doesn't tell the whole story of why their physiques differ so greatly.
SCIENCE
February 6, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Warning: Being a firstborn may be hazardous to your health. So suggests a small study of middle-aged men in New Zealand. Compared with  their younger brothers, the firstborns weighed more and were less sensitive to insulin. Researchers had recruited the guys to be part of clinical trials testing whether olive leaf extract or krill oil could improve their metabolic health. All of the volunteers were between the ages of 35 and 55, and all were overweight, with a body mass index between 25 and 30. To study the effects of birth order, they pulled out data from trial participants who were either the first or second child born in their family.
HEALTH
April 2, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
As if the nation's weight problems were not daunting enough, a new study has found that the body mass index, the 180-year-old formula used to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy weight, may be incorrectly classifying about half of women and just over 20% of men as being the picture of health when their body-fat composition suggests they are obese. The study, published Monday in the journal PLoS One, uses a patient's ratio of fat to lean muscle mass as the "gold standard" for detecting obesity and suggests that it could be a better bellwether of an individual's risk for health problems.
HEALTH
March 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
When roasted at 475 degrees, coffee beans are sometimes described as rich and full-bodied. But for the full-bodied person who is not so rich, unroasted coffee beans - green as the day they were picked - may hold the key to cheap and effective weight loss, new research suggests. In a study presented Tuesday at the American Chemical Society's spring national meeting in San Diego, 16 overweight young adults took, by turns, a low dose of green coffee bean extract, a high dose of the supplement, and a placebo.
NEWS
June 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
The federal government is reducing its threshold for defining who is overweight, determining that someone who stands 5-foot-4 and weighs 145 pounds is hefty enough to harm their health. In guidelines to be formally released later this month, a panel of experts convened by the National Institutes of Health concluded that a person with a body mass index as low as 25--5-foot-4, 145 pounds or 5-foot-10, 174 pounds--should be considered overweight.
NATIONAL
August 4, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
All children should have their body mass index measures evaluated yearly as part of efforts to identify and prevent obesity, the American Academy of Pediatrics says in its first-ever policy statement dealing solely with identifying and preventing the increasingly common problem.
SCIENCE
December 2, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
So your body mass index says you're obese, but you don't have "pre-diabetes" - a mix of factors such as hypertension, high cholesterol and high glucose levels that indicates you're on the road to metabolic illness. And you're thinking you've beaten the odds, right? Wait 10 years, a new study says. Odds are, you'll be proven wrong. New research finds that even when a person is "metabolically healthy," being obese raises his or her risk for cardiovascular disease and premature death.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
There has been lots of excitement this week as a horde of scientists released their first looks at the trillions of microbes that live in (or on) our bodies. As well as the two main papers published in Nature, a slate of reports was published in other journals, containing all kinds of tidbits. One week earlier, another slate of “microbiome” papers was published in the journal Science. We already covered the nuts and bolts of the Human Micriobiome Project report.
SCIENCE
December 2, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
So your body mass index says you're obese, but you don't have "pre-diabetes" - a mix of factors such as hypertension, high cholesterol and high glucose levels that indicates you're on the road to metabolic illness. And you're thinking you've beaten the odds, right? Wait 10 years, a new study says. Odds are, you'll be proven wrong. New research finds that even when a person is "metabolically healthy," being obese raises his or her risk for cardiovascular disease and premature death.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Discriminating against someone for being fat isn't real helpful. That's something scientists have already documented for issues like depression. But a new study says it also seems to make people gain weight. “Rather than motivating individuals to lose weight, weight discrimination increases risk for obesity,” the researchers wrote  in an article released Wednesday in the journal PLOS One. It seems logical that calling someone names  - or worse - for being fat would discourage them from taking part in gym class or other physical activities, and that happens, the researchers said.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
It's no surprise that someone who has never smoked, who eats a Mediterranean diet and keeps a normal weight and who exercises regularly is healthy. How healthy? Chances of death from all causes is reduced by 80% over eight years. Pretty healthy. Those four healthy behaviors also protected against heart disease and the buildup of calcium deposits in the arteries, the researchers said. Those are the results of a multiyear study of more than 6,000 people led by Johns Hopkins University researchers and published online Monday in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
SCIENCE
May 20, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Having childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder could lead to a life of obesity, even if ADHD symptoms disappear in adulthood, a new study shows. The study, which followed up on 207 middle-class men who had been diagnosed with ADHD as children, found that some 33 years after their diagnosis, their body mass index was significantly higher than those without ADHD. Their propensity to become obese was twice that of adults who were never diagnosed with ADHD, according to the study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Karin Klein
To combat a growing problem with anorexia and bulimia, a new law in Israel bans fashion models who are considered unhealthily thin and requires the labeling of photos that are digitally altered to make the models look thinner. Unhealthily thin is defined as a body-mass index lower than 18.5. An example being tossed around is that a woman 5 feet 8 inches tall who weighs 120 pounds would be considered, well, not quite kosher for the cameras. That's a long way from zaftig, but certainly an improvement over the bony waifs that have too long been held up as icons of beauty.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
That's not Mom nagging you to quit scarfing your meal so fast. It's your fork. Specifically, a “smart electronic” Hapifork, designed to vibrate in diners' hands when they chow too quickly. Florida-based creator Hapilabs has also made a similar spoon. Revealed at the CES showcase event “Unveiled” on Sunday, the tech-filled set of utensils are fitted with sensors that track how often they're placed inside someone's mouth. Too many lip trips in too short a time span -- say, three in a single minute -- causes the handle of the fork or spoon to gently pulsate.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | MARTHA WILLMAN and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Don't add another half-hour to your Stairmaster time just yet. Health-conscious Southern Californians buzzed about Wednesday, trying to calculate their "body mass index," after a federal researcher was quoted Tuesday as reporting that overweight Americans are now in the majority. However, the researcher's colleagues at the National Center for Health Statistics sheepishly backed away from the data that jarred so many pudgy Americans out of their recliners.
NEWS
January 3, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Lena Dunham of "Girls" TV show fame will appear in the next issue of V magazine, due out Jan. 10. She was shot by photographer Terry Richardson. [The Cut] Target's holiday collaboration with Neiman Marcus seemed to leave shoppers cold, and Time magazine reports that critics blame prices that were too high for budget-minded Target customers -- consider a Marc Jacobs scarf that started at $69 (it's now slashed to $20) and a Prabul Gurung cape ($79.99, now $23.99) -- along with merchandise that was deemed to be unexciting.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
People whose body mass index is considered normal and healthy may want to think twice about that designation if their waist-to-hip ratio is more suggestive of an apple than a pear, a new study from the Mayo Clinic finds. Normal-weight Americans with an accumulation of fat around the middle were more likely to die of heart disease, and of any other cause, during a 14-year study period than were people whose BMI categorized them as obese but who were more pear-shaped. In fact, they had the highest risk of cardiovascular death of all the categories, including people whose BMIs identified them as overweight or obese.
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