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Body Mass Index Bmi

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HEALTH
April 2, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
As if the nation's weight problems were not daunting enough, a new study has found that the body mass index, the 180-year-old formula used to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy weight, may be incorrectly classifying about half of women and just over 20% of men as being the picture of health when their body-fat composition suggests they are obese. The study, published Monday in the journal PLoS One, uses a patient's ratio of fat to lean muscle mass as the "gold standard" for detecting obesity and suggests that it could be a better bellwether of an individual's risk for health problems.
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HEALTH
April 2, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
As if the nation's weight problems were not daunting enough, a new study has found that the body mass index, the 180-year-old formula used to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy weight, may be incorrectly classifying about half of women and just over 20% of men as being the picture of health when their body-fat composition suggests they are obese. The study, published Monday in the journal PLoS One, uses a patient's ratio of fat to lean muscle mass as the "gold standard" for detecting obesity and suggests that it could be a better bellwether of an individual's risk for health problems.
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HEALTH
February 21, 2005 | Emily Singer, Special to The Times
Obesity's physical toll also exacts a high economic price. Researchers have found that people who are morbidly obese -- and their insurers -- pay almost twice as much for healthcare as people of normal weight. Morbid obesity is defined as weighing at least 100 pounds more than the ideal weight for a specific height, or having a body mass index (BMI) greater than 40.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2009 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gross obesity can take 10 years off your life, as much as heavy smoking, according to a study published Tuesday by the medical journal Lancet. An Oxford University team analyzed 57 studies conducted in the United States and Europe involving 894,576 people. The team correlated deaths to body mass index, or BMI, a commonly used measure of obesity that relates a person's weight and height. They found that people with a BMI over 30 -- which is considered moderately obese -- are likely to have their lives shortened by two to three years.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2008 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
A large European study has confirmed that simple measurements of the waist and hips may offer a better way of predicting obesity-related death than a standard, but more complicated, system of relating weight to height. The standard body mass index, or BMI, method does not work very well for some people, such as the elderly or bodybuilders, and researchers have begun building a case that it is better to look at waist circumference or the ratio of waist size to hip size. Among people with comparable BMIs, having an extra 2 inches around the waist increased the annual risk of death 17% for men and 13% for women, German researchers reported Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
An estimated 5.4 million people in the U.S. have Alzheimer's disease. That leads to … 14.9 million unpaid caregivers, $183 billion in annual costs. So begins the latest report from the Alzheimer's Assn. The report, 2011 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures , sheds more light on the toll the disease takes on not just patients but caregivers. "Unpaid caregivers are primarily family members, but they also include other relatives and friends," the report says.
OPINION
November 20, 2009 | By Michael Rosenberg
I was surprised to read what looks to me like a commentary piece masquerading as a news article ("It's time fruit juice loses its wholesome image, some experts say," Nov. 8) in a newspaper known for its unbiased reporting on health and nutrition. There are independent nutrition experts who see the juice glass as half full, but they were not quoted in this article. Nor was there any mention of the growing body of research, much of it published in respected medical and scientific journals, indicating the health benefits of drinking juice.
OPINION
February 2, 2007
CHILDREN HAVE YET another reason to dread report card day. Along with revealing how well students have mastered reading, writing and arithmetic, school systems are now using the cards to tell parents some bad news: Their children are too fat. Obesity report cards, which typically include students' body mass index (BMI) -- a ratio calculated using height and weight -- are becoming an increasingly popular tool to address childhood obesity.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Famously overweight New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was hospitalized Thursday morning after having trouble breathing.  When his EKG, blood work and chest X-ray came back normal, doctors at the Somerset Medical Center in Somerville, N.J., diagnosed an asthma attack. The rising Republican star has spoken often about his struggles with his weight, even telling CNN talk show host Piers Morgan that he felt "guilty" about it, the Los Angeles Times reported.  He has also talked publicly about living with asthma.  The subject comes up often when he's stumping about healthcare.  According to the Wall Street Journal, the fiscal conservative cites the cost of his asthma medication when expounding on the "generosity of the state health care plan.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The DASH diet (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) is usually prescribed for adults to help them control their high blood pressure. But a study finds that the eating program may also help teen girls gain less weight. The diet, which emphasizes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low-fat and nonfat dairy foods, lean proteins, nuts and limited amounts of fats and sweets, is said to lower blood pressure in adults even without reducing salt intake. The new study focused on 2,379 girls who were ages 9 or 10 at the beginning of the study and followed them for 10 years.
HEALTH
May 7, 2007 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
WITH a bit of early intervention, a pediatrician can nip a lifetime of fat-related health problems in the bud. But a new study finds that pediatricians are failing in large numbers to take step one in the manual of fat prevention -- calculating a child's body mass index, or BMI. In a survey of 400 patients' charts at an academic medical center, researchers from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center found that pediatricians had calculated BMI for roughly 1 in 20 children ages 5 to 11.
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