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Body Piercing

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NEWS
January 24, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Madonna pierced her navel. Axl Rose put a ring through his nipple. And Dennis Rodman, basketball's baddest of bad boys, poked a hole in his nose. In case you've snoozed through the mid-1990s, body piercing is big, really big. Young people, especially, have embraced the art, puncturing the tongue, eyebrows and other parts with gusto. Soon, however, California teens may no longer be contemplating whether to pierce or not to pierce.
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NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
In one of the most comprehensive health examinations of body piercing, researchers have found that the wildly popular fashion statement is relatively safe although about 20% of piercings become infected. Northwestern University dermatologists analyzed the overall safety, complications and medical consequences of piercings, focusing on the ear, nose, mouth, nipple, navel and male and female genitalia. They found infections, although treatable, were the most common complication, followed by allergies, loss of blood, scarring and interference of medical procedures, such as X-ray or ultrasound.
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NEWS
May 28, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minors who want their bodies pierced would need a note from Mom or Dad under legislation that won overwhelming approval Tuesday in the Assembly. The bill, by Assemblyman George Runner Jr. (R-Lancaster), would make it an infraction to pierce a child under 18 unless a parent is present or provides notarized consent. Only ears would be exempt under the legislation, which went to the state Senate on a 71-1 vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
First, they could grow a mustache, just like Walt Disney. Now, they can grow a little more facial hair but not quite enough to be like most of the Seven Dwarfs. Disneyland announced that it's loosened up its legendary dress code — known as the Disney Look — to allow employees to grow more facial hair. But the rules still forbid visible tattoos, body piercings (other than the ears for women), "extreme" hairstyles or colors. (Shaved heads are OK for men, but a no-go for women.)
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | ROBERT BURNS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guns 'n Roses' Axl Rose wore a discreet nipple ring on tour last year and guitarist Izzy Stradlin has a nose ring. Rachel Bolan, bass player for Skid Row, wears a chain from nose to ear. For metal musicians, these are pretty mild fashion statements. But it's another thing to see your bank teller with a ring through her septum or a store clerk with a small barbell through his eyebrow. After being fashionable among '80s punks (remember safety pins through the cheeks?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Alarmed by the recent debut of the city's first tattoo and body piercing parlor, the San Fernando City Council on Monday unanimously passed an emergency ordinance imposing a 45-day moratorium on the opening of similar businesses. Councilman Raul Godinez II, acting as mayor pro tem at Monday's council meeting, said the city would use the time to possible zoning restrictions that would make businesses offering tattoos, body-piercing or selling drug paraphernalia less accessible to minors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1997 | From The Associated Press
Teenagers would have to get parental consent before having most parts of their bodies pierced for jewelry or decoration, under a bill by an Antelope Valley legislator approved Thursday in the Senate. The bill by Assemblyman George Runner (R-Lancaster) would levy $250 fines against anyone who pierces, or offers to pierce, the body of a minor unless a parent is present or has provided written permission. The minors would not be liable for punishment, nor would parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
In a bid to keep tattoo and body-piercing establishments out of San Fernando, the City Council will consider an ordinance Monday that would require the trendy procedures to be "directly supervised" by a physician. Mayor Raul Godinez II said that the ordinance was designed to ensure that piercing and tattoos are performed safely, but he also acknowledged that the council would like to make it prohibitively expensive for such businesses to operate in the city.
NEWS
April 26, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hours of swaying trance-like and chanting Islamic prayers, the dervishes who live in Serbia's Kosovo province began the ultimate test of their faith. Crowded before a dervish altar, the little boys went first. Shejh Xhemali Shehu, the holy father of the clan, blessed a metal spear the size of a knitting needle and then guided it through the fleshy cheek of each youngster's beaming face. No blood. A miracle, the holy father proclaimed. The older men went next.
BOOKS
September 17, 2006 | Leslie Savan, Leslie Savan is the author of "Slam Dunks and No-Brainers: Language in Your Life, the Media, Business, Politics, and, Like, Whatever" and "The Sponsored Life: Ads, TV, and American Culture."
DESPITE the influence of "Don't Think of an Elephant," linguist George Lakoff's remedial language course for Democrats, the party out of power still has a language problem. Liberal politicians still don't talk from the gut; they create sleep-inducing slogans like "Together, America Can Do Better"; and, awed by conservative rhetoric, they do little more than stalk the talk: "I have values too," they insist. "I am a person of faith. Really."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2006 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
New laws governing young drivers, homeowners associations, the marketing of fish and the sale of puppies take effect with the new year. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed 729 bills into law in 2005. That was fewer new laws than in any year since at least 1967. Lawmakers took a number of actions to protect the privacy of Californians. They made it a crime to use e-mail ruses to try to dupe people into revealing private information.
HEALTH
March 21, 2005 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
A pierced lip or tongue may be a fashion statement of youth, but new evidence suggests that oral piercing may lead to receded gums, a sign of age that is the origin of the expression "long in the tooth." Researchers at Ohio State University in Columbus looked at 58 young adults with an average age between 21 and 22. Half had pierced lips and the other half did not, although both groups were otherwise alike in age and gender. Among the subjects with a pierced lip, 41.
SPORTS
August 16, 2003 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
It's a stereotype to say that every athlete at the X Games has tattoos and body piercings, but those things are a crucial part of the makeup of X Games athletes. So are baggy clothes and dyed hair. And anything else that defies the mainstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2002 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Alto saxophonist Ornette Coleman returned to the San Francisco Jazz Festival Thursday night for the first time since his controversial appearance in 1994. That now-legendary performance was a multimedia presentation featuring music, video, contortionists and multiple body piercing.
HEALTH
June 10, 2002 | LINDA MARSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tattoos and body piercings have become so commonplace they seem almost innocuous--even pop star Britney Spears, an idol to millions of preteens, has a navel ring. But by shrugging off such adornments, parents may be doing their kids a disservice, experts say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From where Steve Lorens sat, a needle etching the image of a Rottweiler into his upper back, the idea of Los Angeles County government regulating the tattoo business areas sounded absurd. "Are they going to walk around and give each tattoo an A, B, C or D?" Lorens asked as he sat in a Covina tattoo parlor, referring to the county's rating system for restaurants. "They call this America. You should be able to do what you want."
NEWS
October 8, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Body piercers beware: Poking holes through a minor's tongue or navel without parental consent could soon trigger more than just a mother's wrath. Under legislation signed Tuesday by Gov. Pete Wilson, it will be illegal to pierce those under 18 unless a parent is present or provides notarized permission. Only one body part is exempt from the rule--the ear.
HEALTH
February 18, 2002 | EMILY DWASS
Not that long ago, it was fairly common practice for kids to pierce each other's ears with an ice cube and a needle, a practice that could result in a nasty infection. These days, kids are better informed about ear piercing, knowing that they can go to the doctor's office or jewelry store to have the procedure done. It's generally considered a safer bet to go to a doctor--usually a dermatologist.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2000 | Lisa Girion
AN apartment-leasing agent who was fired after she pierced her tongue and then sued will go back to work Nov. 1 as part of an out-of-court settlement with her employer. On Saturday, representatives of Los Angeles-based Oakwood Worldwide delivered a letter inviting Mary Haudenshield, 29, back to work, two days after she filed a discrimination suit.
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