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Body Piercing

NEWS
April 26, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hours of swaying trance-like and chanting Islamic prayers, the dervishes who live in Serbia's Kosovo province began the ultimate test of their faith. Crowded before a dervish altar, the little boys went first. Shejh Xhemali Shehu, the holy father of the clan, blessed a metal spear the size of a knitting needle and then guided it through the fleshy cheek of each youngster's beaming face. No blood. A miracle, the holy father proclaimed. The older men went next.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From where Steve Lorens sat, a needle etching the image of a Rottweiler into his upper back, the idea of Los Angeles County government regulating the tattoo business areas sounded absurd. "Are they going to walk around and give each tattoo an A, B, C or D?" Lorens asked as he sat in a Covina tattoo parlor, referring to the county's rating system for restaurants. "They call this America. You should be able to do what you want."
NEWS
October 8, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Body piercers beware: Poking holes through a minor's tongue or navel without parental consent could soon trigger more than just a mother's wrath. Under legislation signed Tuesday by Gov. Pete Wilson, it will be illegal to pierce those under 18 unless a parent is present or provides notarized permission. Only one body part is exempt from the rule--the ear.
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
As trends go, body piercing has hit it big. Nose and navel rings, tongue studs and ears laced with dangling wires no longer warrant a double take. What does deserve a second look, however, are the related health risks and possible complications. Serious side effects appear rare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1996 | TIM MAY
The item stuck out on the City Council agenda like a sore thumb: "Tattoo/Body Piercing Survey Results." But it wasn't a report on the number of San Fernando city employees who have pierced noses or anchors stenciled across their biceps. The subject was what, if anything, the city could do about its first tattoo parlor, Chubb's Clothing and Record Shop, which opened about three weeks ago on Brand Boulevard. The answer: not much.
HEALTH
September 22, 1997 | SUSAN OKIE, THE WASHINGTON POST
With the growing popularity of body piercing, dentists are becoming concerned about complications that can occur when people have had jewelry or metal devices placed in the tongue and other parts of the mouth. Such piercing is done by unlicensed, self-trained operators, without anesthesia. Pain and swelling are frequent, but other side effects can include prolonged bleeding, chipped teeth, scarring and infections, according to the Journal of the American Dental Assn. Drs. Shelia S.
HEALTH
June 10, 2002 | LINDA MARSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tattoos and body piercings have become so commonplace they seem almost innocuous--even pop star Britney Spears, an idol to millions of preteens, has a navel ring. But by shrugging off such adornments, parents may be doing their kids a disservice, experts say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1996 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the surface, Scott Dygert seems to have everything. Not only is Dygert, a high school junior, the student body vice president and president of the Debate Club, but he was also selected to represent his peers on Assemblywoman Debra Bowen's (D-Marina del Rey) Youth Council. And last year, he lettered in track.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | HILARY DOLE KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last year my nephew Billy Jon, then a fifth-grader in Santa Barbara, talked his mother into letting him get his ear pierced, something that would have been unheard of in a 10-year-old boy a few years ago. Even more shocking would have been the notion of his mother taking him to get it done. He did use an age-old strategy to get her permission, however: "I told her that lots of kids in my school had them, including even a couple of kindergartners--that was kind of an exaggeration."
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | D. JAMES ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here we are at the end of a century of scientific and technological advances so vast they may surpass the rest of humankind's history of knowledge--and cutting-edge culture has some of us looking like tribal nomads ready to take some heads: barbells in our eyebrows. Studs in our chins. Hoops in our genitalia. Many in California--this holy mecca of holes--say they pierce their bodies to fully realize their individuality.
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