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Body Piercing

HEALTH
September 22, 1997 | SUSAN OKIE, THE WASHINGTON POST
With the growing popularity of body piercing, dentists are becoming concerned about complications that can occur when people have had jewelry or metal devices placed in the tongue and other parts of the mouth. Such piercing is done by unlicensed, self-trained operators, without anesthesia. Pain and swelling are frequent, but other side effects can include prolonged bleeding, chipped teeth, scarring and infections, according to the Journal of the American Dental Assn. Drs. Shelia S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1997 | From The Associated Press
Teenagers would have to get parental consent before having most parts of their bodies pierced for jewelry or decoration, under a bill by an Antelope Valley legislator approved Thursday in the Senate. The bill by Assemblyman George Runner (R-Lancaster) would levy $250 fines against anyone who pierces, or offers to pierce, the body of a minor unless a parent is present or has provided written permission. The minors would not be liable for punishment, nor would parents.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minors who want their bodies pierced would need a note from Mom or Dad under legislation that won overwhelming approval Tuesday in the Assembly. The bill, by Assemblyman George Runner Jr. (R-Lancaster), would make it an infraction to pierce a child under 18 unless a parent is present or provides notarized consent. Only ears would be exempt under the legislation, which went to the state Senate on a 71-1 vote.
NEWS
March 12, 1997 | From Associated Press
A bill to require parental permission for a teenager to pierce assorted body parts was bombarded with amendments and questions Tuesday until an Assembly committee postponed a vote to sort it all out. "I think there are too many holes in it," said Assemblywoman Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) with a grin. "It doesn't appear to me this is very well thought out," said Assemblywoman Carole Migden (D-San Francisco).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1997
Thank you for putting "Bill Seeks OK of Parents for Body Piercing" (Jan. 24) on the front page where it's sure to receive the ridicule it deserves. Lancaster Assemblyman George Runner Jr.'s proposal to require parental approval before kids do anything so rash as pierce a bellybutton seems a strange position for a "get the government out of people's lives" Republican. Gosh, parents really need the government's help on this one! As your story implies, the government might plausibly have a role in regulating the sanitary conditions of piercing parlors, but Runner's bill is aimed not at improving hygiene, but at bolstering the power of majors over minors.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Madonna pierced her navel. Axl Rose put a ring through his nipple. And Dennis Rodman, basketball's baddest of bad boys, poked a hole in his nose. In case you've snoozed through the mid-1990s, body piercing is big, really big. Young people, especially, have embraced the art, puncturing the tongue, eyebrows and other parts with gusto. Soon, however, California teens may no longer be contemplating whether to pierce or not to pierce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1996 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the surface, Scott Dygert seems to have everything. Not only is Dygert, a high school junior, the student body vice president and president of the Debate Club, but he was also selected to represent his peers on Assemblywoman Debra Bowen's (D-Marina del Rey) Youth Council. And last year, he lettered in track.
NEWS
September 24, 1996 | By MARK EHRMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The dominant sound at Tattoo Mania's fifth annual Inkslingers Ball was the incessant buzzing of electric needles. It easily drowned out the alternative rock music coming out of the PA system. In almost every booth, someone was offering up a bared ankle, back, thigh or other body part to be permanently decorated with the design of their choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Alarmed by the recent debut of the city's first tattoo and body piercing parlor, the San Fernando City Council on Monday unanimously passed an emergency ordinance imposing a 45-day moratorium on the opening of similar businesses. Councilman Raul Godinez II, acting as mayor pro tem at Monday's council meeting, said the city would use the time to possible zoning restrictions that would make businesses offering tattoos, body-piercing or selling drug paraphernalia less accessible to minors.
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