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OPINION
January 7, 2014
Re "Big tax breaks for the taking," Column, Jan. 5 As Boeing's threat to relocate final assembly of its new 777X from Washington state to whichever state or whichever workers can offer it the best deal shows, the race to the bottom continues. Corporations play one government against another to gain tax breaks and other benefits. The "winning" entity often receives dubious value in return for the gifts. The primary effect nationwide is to reduce the corporations' tax contributions, transferring the burden to individuals.
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BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boosted by strong sales in its first financial quarter, Boeing Co. beat analysts' estimates largely due to an increased production rate of commercial jetliners. The Chicago aerospace giant reported a profit of $965 million, or $1.28 a share. That's down 12.7% from last year's first-quarter profit of $1.11 billion, or $1.44 a share. Boeing attributed the fall to a $330-million write-off related to changes in its pension plans and a one-time tax credit in 2013. The company's core earnings -- excluding retirement costs and the write-off -- rose to $1.76 per share, up from $1.73 during the same period a year ago. Analysts had expected core profit of $1.56 per share.
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OPINION
June 15, 2011
The National Labor Relations Board accused Boeing earlier this year of illegally retaliating against unionized workers by expanding its facilities in a largely nonunion state, South Carolina. Republicans joined much of corporate America in denouncing the board's complaint, calling it a barely disguised attack on state "right to work" laws that make it harder for unions to organize. The questions raised by the board are legitimate ones. The problem is the remedy it has proposed, which would have the perverse effect of confining Boeing's growth to its home region.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boosted by strong sales, Boeing Co. beat analysts' estimates for its first quarter largely because of faster production of commercial jetliners. The Chicago aerospace giant reported a profit of $965 million, or $1.28 a share. That's down 12.7% from $1.11 billion, or $1.44 a share, a year earlier. Boeing attributed the fall to a $330-million write-off related to changes in its pension plans and a one-time tax credit in 2013. The company's core earnings - excluding retirement costs and the write-off - rose to $1.76 a share, up from $1.73 a share a year earlier.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co. announced plans to close its long-standing facility in Wichita, Kan., where the company works on B-52 Stratofortress bombers and aerial refueling tankers. The company's historic facility in Wichita has played a large role in city's claim to be the Air Capital of the World. During World War II, the Boeing complex churned out B-29 Superfortress bombers and later the larger B-52s. More than 2,160 people are employed at the facility. Boeing said work will gradually be scaled down before it is officially closed by the end of next year.
OPINION
January 7, 2014 | By Hedrick Smith
The narrowly approved contract agreement between Boeing and its Washington state workforce will be hailed by some as a victory for the canny, hardball brinkmanship of Boeing's management and the knuckle-under economic pragmatism of the International Machinists Union. But the steep cutbacks in retirement and health benefits that tens of thousands of Boeing workers were forced to swallow have far larger implications for middle-class America. Boeing's stingy treatment of its highly skilled workforce offers a vivid example of how America's new economy has created gaping economic inequalities and steadily squeezed the economic life out of the U.S. middle class over the last three decades, even as corporate profits and CEO pay have skyrocketed.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co. has discovered a flaw in fuselage sections that may affect 55 of its new 787 Dreamliner jets and slow some deliveries, James Albaugh , Boeing's chief executive officer of commercial airplanes, said Wednesday. The Dreamliner is an all-new commercial jet that is largely made of lightweight carbon composites rather than sheets of aluminum. The plane made its first passenger flight with All Nippon Airways in October , but it was more than three years late because of design problems and supplier issues.
OPINION
July 7, 2010
A World Trade Organization panel's finding that the European aviation company Airbus had benefited from years of unfair subsidies is, on its surface, a victory for Boeing and the United States in their six-year quest to force Airbus to compete on a level playing field. Yet it also lays the groundwork for an important precedent that could ultimately help both firms in future disputes against new state-subsidized competitors. The trade body focused on the support that Airbus has received from European governments to help develop and launch virtually all of its large civilian airplane models.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2009 | Julie Johnsson
SEATTLE -- The crowd of workers and dignitaries lining Paine Field today held their breath as the Boeing 787 Dreamliner roared down the runway, lifted its nose into the air and then flew north with two chase planes trailing along the horizon and then into a bank of clouds. For the first time, a passenger jetliner with a body and wings made of super-hardened plastics took wing, a milestone that promises to usher in a new era in aviation. The plane was scheduled to circle over the Puget Sound for four or so hours, as Michael Carriker and co-pilot Randall Neville test whether the 787's state-of-the-art wing and electronics systems perform as designed.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
On a rainy and blustery day at Boeing Co.'s facilities in Everett, Wash., the aerospace giant formally delivered the world's first passenger-ready 787 Dreamliner to Japanese carrier All Nippon Airways Co. Standing shoulder to shoulder, a crowd of about 500 employees, local politicians and aviation industry insiders gathered on a wet tarmac to see Boeing hand over the ceremonial key for the new aircraft to All Nippon. Depending on how individual airlines configure the new planes, they hold the prospect of being faster, more fuel-efficient and having more legroom and overhead space for baggage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna, Kate Mather and James Rainey
The dark of night still draped Mineta San Jose International Airport when a 15-year-old boy from nearby Santa Clara wandered onto a secure airport ramp and toward a Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767. Then he disappeared. The slight teenager, first seen on a security camera video, would not appear again until later Sunday morning, when airline workers spotted him 2,350 miles to the west, walking on the tarmac at Kahului Airport on the island of Maui. In the interim, authorities say, the boy survived a perilous, 5 1/2 -hour odyssey - enduring frigid temperatures, oxygen deprivation and a compartment unfit for human habitation - as he traveled over the Pacific Ocean in the jet's wheel well.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
A high-stakes battle is underway in Washington over launching the U.S. government's most sophisticated national security satellites. Space entrepreneur Elon Musk is pitted against the nation's two largest weapons makers, Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp., in a fight for military contracts worth as much as $70 billion through 2030. For eight years, the Pentagon has paid Boeing and Lockheed - operating jointly as United Launch Alliance - to launch the government's pricey spy satellites without seeking competitive bids.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace giant Boeing Co., which for years has been cutting its workforce in Southern California, announced that it plans to increase its engineering workforce in Long Beach and Seal Beach by 1,000 positions over the next two years. It is a surprising announcement from the plane maker, which has 1,800 commercial engineers in Long Beach and Seal Beach. The company said earlier in the week that it would shutter its C-17 production line three months earlier than planned in mid-2015.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
After years of eliminating jobs in Southern California, aerospace giant Boeing Co. announced plans to increase its engineering workforce in Long Beach and Seal Beach by 1,000 positions. It is a rare and welcome development for the Southland's beleaguered aerospace industry, which has been stung by layoffs and assembly line closures for decades. "I couldn't be happier for the region," Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster said. "We want to continue to carry on our aviation tradition here.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co. announced plans to stop production of C-17 cargo jets at the company's sprawling Long Beach plant three months earlier than it previously anticipated. The aerospace giant said Monday it will shutter the 1.1-million-square-foot facility in mid-2015 due to “current market trends and the timing of expected orders.”  The plane maker had initially said that production would come to an end in late 2015. The company said it expects to record $50 million in accounting charges in the first quarter as a result of Monday's announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By David Ng
The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum - one of Washington's most reliable tourist attractions - is receiving a $30-million gift from Boeing and will use the money to renovate its main exhibition space that serves as home to such icons of aviation as the Wright Brothers' airplane and Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis. Officials at the Smithsonian made the announcement Thursday, saying that the renovation is expected to be completed in 2016, the museum's 40th anniversary.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2011
The Federal Aviation Administration has cleared the way for the new Boeing 787 to take its first commercial flight. Both the FAA and European regulators certified the plane for flight Friday. Boeing Co. completed flight tests on the 787 this month. Boeing plans to deliver the first 787 to Japan's All Nippon Airways in September. The airline plans to fly it for the first time as a charter on Oct. 26 and begin regular service Nov. 1. Because of various production problems, delivery is about three years late.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2012 | Bloomberg
U.S. aviation regulators proposed to fine Boeing Co. $13.6 million for delays in telling airlines how to install devices on 383 aircraft to prevent fuel-tank explosions. Boeing was given a Dec. 27, 2010 deadline to submit instructions on how to add the systems in its U.S.-registered 747 jumbo jets and 757 single-aisle planes, according an e- mailed statement today by the Federal Aviation Administration. The Chicago-based company missed the deadline for 747s by 301 days, and was 406 days late for 757s, according to the FAA release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
In documents filed with federal accident investigators, Asiana Airlines stated Monday that flawed automatic throttles and the pilots themselves failed to maintain enough speed and altitude to safely land at San Francisco International Airport in July. Asiana's assertion about the throttles was immediately countered by Boeing Co., which lodged its own report with investigators, saying that the pilots were solely to blame and Boeing 777's automated throttle system was working properly.
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - The Australian Maritime Safety Authority said Friday it had a new "credible lead" that suggested Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 probably crashed 680 miles northeast of the search area where more than a dozen planes and ships have been looking the last 10 days. The location was changed after a new analysis of radar data from the South China Sea and Malacca Strait before contact was lost with the Boeing 777, which was carrying 239 passengers and crew members when it disappeared March 8. "It indicated that the aircraft was traveling faster than previously estimated, resulting in increased fuel usage and reducing the possible distance the aircraft traveled south into the Indian Ocean," the Australian agency said Friday.
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