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WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan, Ralph Vartabedian and Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - Calm seas returned Wednesday to aid the search for the missing Flight 370, but public protests and the first legal filing on behalf of a passenger hinted at a stormy forecast for Malaysia and its state-supported airline. Executives of Malaysia Airlines said Tuesday that they would pay at least $5,000 to each of the families of the 227 passengers aboard the Boeing 777 that disappeared March 8, but the gesture appeared to provide little comfort to distraught relatives, about 100 of whom marched to the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing, where some clashed with police.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Dominic Gates
SEATTLE - A review of crucial systems on Boeing's 787 Dreamliner ordered immediately after two serious 787 battery failures in January 2013 has concluded that the jetliner is safe, meets design standards and is about as reliable as other Boeing aircraft were after being introduced, according to a final report published Wednesday. The review, conducted by Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing Co. technical experts, also validates the oversight role played by the regulatory agency, concluding that "the FAA had effective processes in place to identify and correct issues.
WORLD
March 17, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan and Barbara Demick
The U.S. military pulled its warship out of the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 on Monday and will rely instead on sophisticated submarine-hunting aircraft, a sign of just how complex the international search for the missing Boeing 777 has become in its second week. At least 26 nations have deployed ships, aircraft and satellites in one of the largest international coalitions ever mustered in a search and rescue operation. Search teams are concentrating on wide bands in both the northern and southern hemispheres west of Malaysia, crossing the territories of a dozen Asian nations as well as the sparsely traveled waters of the southern Indian Ocean.
WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Saturday that missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 was diverted due to “deliberate action” by either a passenger or crew member. He also said the Boeing 777 might have flown for as long as eight hours after its takeoff at 12:20 a.m. March 9, meaning that in theory it could have traveled thousands of miles. Najib said investigators were focusing their search now on two air traffic corridors -- a southern one heading from Indonesia to the south Indian Ocean, and a northern one that would have taken the flight toward Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan.
WORLD
March 8, 2014 | By Julie Makinen and Richard A. Serrano
BEIJING - A massive search was underway Sunday for a missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner, focusing on a spot off the southern coast of Vietnam where two large oil slicks were reported. But there were, so far, no clues to why the China-bound flight vanished without warning with 239 people on board. Malaysian officials investigating the disappearance said they were not ruling out terrorism - or any other causes - as reports emerged that two Europeans listed on the passenger manifest were not aboard and their passports had been lost or stolen.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co. has notified airlines that a change in a supplier's manufacturing process may have resulted in hairline cracks on the wings of about 40 of its yet-to-be-delivered 787 Dreamliners. Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. told Boeing there was a problem related to fasteners on the 787's carbon fiber composite wing. Boeing, which has delivered 123 of the planes, said the problem may be present in a limited number of airplanes still in production, but none of its in-service fleet is involved.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co., the aerospace giant that makes fighter jets, airliners and satellites, is now looking at getting into the cell phone business. The Chicago company said it has developed an ultra-secure smartphone that's marketed toward U.S. defense and security communities. Few details have been released. What is known is the Boeing Black smartphone runs off an Android operating system, contains encrypted storage for sensitive data and has a self-destruct mode. If someone tries to pop open the device, it is automatically wiped of its data and made inoperable.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace giant Boeing Co. said it is going to start cranking out the company's bestselling 737 jets at its highest production rate ever. The company, which assembles the single-aisle airliner in Renton, Wash., said it is going to build 737s at the increased rate of 42 airplanes per month. That's up 33% from 31.5 planes a month since 2010. Mechanics will load initial parts into an automated assembly machine on Wednesday, which marks the start of the new rate, Boeing said. The first 737 built at the new rate is scheduled to be delivered in the second quarter.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The Federal Aviation Administration ordered inspections Monday of Boeing 767 jets to check for problems that could result in a "possible loss of control of the airplane," according to a notice published in the Federal Register.  Monday's order is the latest in a string of inspections dating back to 2000. The FAA is calling for inspections of the horizontal flight-control surfaces, called elevators, that help the jets climb and descend. The agency said faulty parts could result "in a significant pitch upset" and cause pilots to lose control of the aircraft.
TRAVEL
January 19, 2014 | Los Angeles Times
Regarding "Next Stop Was America," by Jane Lavere, Jan. 12: The Red Star Museum asked for stories. Here's one I sent. We'll visit the museum later this year. My maternal grandparents, Itzig (Jacob) and Blima Dora Rebecca Haimotiz Pinkowitz, traveled from their village in Romania to Philadelphia via the Red Star Line at the turn of the 20th century. Their leaving was probably due to fear of anti-Semitism and a search for a better life. My grandfather and his eldest daughter crossed the Atlantic on the Red Star Line ship Switzerland, leaving Antwerp, Belgium, on Aug. 1, 1900, and arriving in Philadelphia.
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