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BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Federal Aviation Administration is developing a plan requiring airlines to inspect the emergency devices on their Boeing 787 Dreamliners after a fire erupted on the plane last week while it was parked at London's Heathrow Airport. On Friday the agency said these mandatory inspections “would ask operators to inspect for proper wire routing and any signs of wire damage or pinching, as well as inspect the battery compartment for unusual signs of heating or moisture.” The FAA plan is not expected to ground the worldwide 787 fleet, as happened earlier this year.
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BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner operated by Japan Airlines had to return to Boston's Logan International Airport after an indicator light came on in the cockpit. Japan Airlines Co. Flight 7 was bound for Tokyo, but instead made a U-turn over Canada and landed in Boston. “As a standard precautionary measure due to a maintenance message -- fuel pump indicator -- JL007 bound for Tokyo-Narita is returning to Boston Logan for check,” airline spokeswoman Carol Anderson said. FULL COVERAGE: Boeing's troubled Dreamliner The Federal Aviation Administration said the 787 circled in the vicinity of the airport to burn off fuel before landing.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
British accident investigators determined that an emergency device was probably responsible for the fire that broke out last week on an empty Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner parked at London's Heathrow Airport and advised airlines to disable it on all planes. In addition, Britain's Air Accidents Investigation Branch issued a “special bulletin” Thursday urging U.S. regulators to conduct an extensive safety review. The Federal Aviation Administration will now have to decide what to do about the device, which is installed on the worldwide problem-plagued 787 fleet and thousands of other commercial airplanes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | By Victoria Kim and Kate Mather, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Eighty-three of the passengers who were on Asiana Airlines Flight 214 that crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport took steps to sue the aircraft's manufacturer, Boeing, a law firm representing the passengers announced Tuesday. A petition beginning a lawsuit has been filed in Chicago, where Boeing is headquartered, according to a press release from the firm, Chicago-based Ribbeck Law Chartered. Papers will be filed in the coming days against Asiana Airlines and component part manufacturers, attorneys said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | By Victoria Kim and W.J. Hennigan
More than 80 passengers who were aboard Asiana Flight 214 when it crash-landed in San Francisco have taken steps toward a lawsuit against the airline and Boeing Co., the plane's manufacturer, attorneys representing the survivors announced Tuesday. The Chicago-based firm Ribbeck Law Chartered filed a "petition for discovery" Monday against Boeing, asking the Circuit Court of Cook County in Illinois to order the manufacturer to turn over information on the design and parts suppliers of the Boeing 777 aircraft that clipped a sea wall and hurtled across the runway at San Francisco International Airport.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A key supplier on Boeing Co.'s 787 Dreamliner passenger jet has confirmed it has joined the ongoing investigation into a fire that broke out last week on an Ethiopian Airlines aircraft parked at London's Heathrow Airport. Honeywell International Inc. makes the plane's emergency locater transmitter, which is a device installed on all commercial airplanes. Known as an ELT, it transmits signals in an emergency. So if a plane is involved in a crash, the transmitter will alert search parties to its location.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Wall Street seems unfazed by the latest incident to hit Boeing Co.'s 787 Dreamliner. The company's stock has been trading up all day. Boeing's shares were trading up $3.57, or 3.5%  to $105.44, recovering much of its loss of nearly 5%, or $5.01, on Friday. That same day, a 787 that had been sitting at a remote parking stand for more than eight hours at London's Heathrow Airport caught fire. No one was onboard the Ethiopian Airlines plane and no one was injured, the airline and an airport spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
One of Boeing Co.'s major suppliers for its 787 Dreamliner passenger jet will help determine if its emergency device played any part in a fire that broke out last week on an empty aircraft parked at London's Heathrow Airport. Honeywell International Inc., maker of the plane's emergency locater transmitter, joined Britain's Air Accidents Investigation Branch in the probe, along with the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, the Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing. The transmitter, installed on commercial airplanes, emits signals to emergency crews in crisis situations.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Just as Boeing Co. and its 787 Dreamliner looked to be taking off again, another fire onboard the signature new passenger jet has brought the resurgence to a halt. A 787 - one of 68 delivered so far by Boeing - that had been sitting at a remote parking stand for more than eight hours at London's Heathrow Airport caught fire Friday. No one was onboard the Ethiopian Airlines plane and no one was injured, the airline and an airport spokeswoman said. Boeing shares swerved on the news, falling as much as 7% before rebounding slightly to close down 5%, or $5.01, at $101.87 as analysts said the incident didn't appear related to the battery troubles that grounded 787s worldwide earlier this year.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
An empty Boeing Co. Dreamliner passenger jet belonging to Ethiopian Airlines caught fire Friday while parked on the tarmac at London's Heathrow Airport. Boeing shares were down more than 6% as news spread of the latest incident involving Boeing's beleaguered 787 model. “We're aware of the event,” the company said in a statement. “We have Boeing personnel on the ground at Heathrow and are working to fully understand and address this. " Earlier this year, the Dreamliner was grounded because of malfunctions of the plane's lithium-ion batteries.
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