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Bolivarian Revolution

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OPINION
December 16, 2012 | By Charles Shapiro
When Venezuela President Hugo Chavez announced last weekend that his cancer was back and he was returning to Cuba for surgery, he was flanked by two men: On his left was his vice president, Nicolas Maduro, and on his right was Diosdado Cabello, president of the National Assembly. The presence of these two men is significant. Chavez was sending an unambiguous message to his supporters. If his health were to prevent him from finishing out his term - or being sworn in Jan. 10 for his fourth term, as the information minister has said might be a possibility - these were men he trusted to continue his "Bolivarian Revolution.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 7, 2013
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, who died Tuesday of cancer at age 58, was beloved and reviled, bombastic and provocative, a flamboyant figure who was vastly influential in his country and throughout the region. The former paratrooper-turned-populist promised to use Venezuela's vast oil wealth to improve life for the country's poor, and by most accounts he did just that. From 1997 to 2011, he reduced the percentage of people living in moderate poverty from 54% to 31%, and those living in extreme poverty from 23% to 9%, according to the World Bank.
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OPINION
September 30, 2010
The results of Venezuela's National Assembly elections this week demonstrate once again that it is wise for opposition groups to participate in political competitions, even when the odds are heavily stacked against them. In 2005, opponents of President Hugo Chavez tried to discredit the Assembly election by boycotting it, leaving the arena to the populist leader's loyalists. This time, they ran candidates under the banner of the Table for Democratic Unity and won 61 of the 165 Assembly seats, denying Chavez the two-thirds majority he had used to rewrite fundamental laws, appoint Supreme Court justices and consolidate power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2013 | By Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, the charismatic socialist whose Bolivarian Revolution reduced poverty and galvanized anti-American sentiment across Latin America but left his nation deeply polarized and ever more dependent on oil dollars, died Tuesday in Caracas after a nearly-two-year battle with cancer. He was 58. Vice President Nicolas Maduro announced the passing on national television, saying that Chavez had died at 4:25 p.m. His death followed repeated treatments for pelvic cancer in Cuba, the country of his idol Fidel Castro, where his condition was first diagnosed in June 2011.
OPINION
March 7, 2013
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, who died Tuesday of cancer at age 58, was beloved and reviled, bombastic and provocative, a flamboyant figure who was vastly influential in his country and throughout the region. The former paratrooper-turned-populist promised to use Venezuela's vast oil wealth to improve life for the country's poor, and by most accounts he did just that. From 1997 to 2011, he reduced the percentage of people living in moderate poverty from 54% to 31%, and those living in extreme poverty from 23% to 9%, according to the World Bank.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Paul West
Is Venezuela's cancer-ridden strongman Hugo Chavez a serious threat to the national security of the United States? Mitt Romney thinks so.  And the Republican presidential candidate sharply attacked President Obama on Wednesday for appearing to think otherwise - a hard-line salvo likely to resonate loudest in the southern part of the swing state of Florida, where conservative Cuban Americans are a potent voting bloc. What Obama actually stated, in a brief White House interview this week with a Spanish-language radio and TV journalist, did not, on its face, appear all that incendiary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2013 | By Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, the charismatic socialist whose Bolivarian Revolution reduced poverty and galvanized anti-American sentiment across Latin America but left his nation deeply polarized and ever more dependent on oil dollars, died Tuesday in Caracas after a nearly-two-year battle with cancer. He was 58. Vice President Nicolas Maduro announced the passing on national television, saying that Chavez had died at 4:25 p.m. His death followed repeated treatments for pelvic cancer in Cuba, the country of his idol Fidel Castro, where his condition was first diagnosed in June 2011.
WORLD
April 7, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
When Elbert Santiago, a poor messenger service employee and father of three, heard about a chance to trade up from his "hole" of a slum apartment to a place a short stroll from the presidential palace, he didn't think twice. After all, the price was the same for both places: practically nothing. Santiago is a squatter, one of the army of poor who with the encouragement of leftist President Hugo Chavez have taken over an estimated 155 office, apartment and government buildings here in the Venezuelan capital.
WORLD
October 8, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and his supporters on Monday celebrated his reelection, while many in the country wondered whether his victory could result in improved relations with opposition parties after a decade of bitterness and division. Chavez, who captured 55% of the vote Sunday to handily beat challenger and former Miranda state Gov. Henrique Capriles, who received 44%, indicated via Twitter that he'd had a good postelection talk with his opponent.
WORLD
January 10, 2013 | By Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has kiddingly called Nicolas Maduro "the bus driver" in reference to his former role as a union leader and mocked his voracious consumption of submarine sandwiches. But the cancer-stricken Chavez, flush from his resounding reelection victory last year, clearly thought highly of Maduro, naming him vice president in October. Now, with Chavez recovering from surgery in Cuba, Maduro in effect must be taken seriously as the president's anointed successor.
WORLD
January 10, 2013 | By Chris Kraul and Mery Mogollon, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has kiddingly called Nicolas Maduro "the bus driver" in reference to his former role as a union leader and mocked his voracious consumption of submarine sandwiches. But the cancer-stricken Chavez, flush from his resounding reelection victory last year, clearly thought highly of Maduro, naming him vice president in October. Now, with Chavez recovering from surgery in Cuba, Maduro in effect must be taken seriously as the president's anointed successor.
OPINION
December 16, 2012 | By Charles Shapiro
When Venezuela President Hugo Chavez announced last weekend that his cancer was back and he was returning to Cuba for surgery, he was flanked by two men: On his left was his vice president, Nicolas Maduro, and on his right was Diosdado Cabello, president of the National Assembly. The presence of these two men is significant. Chavez was sending an unambiguous message to his supporters. If his health were to prevent him from finishing out his term - or being sworn in Jan. 10 for his fourth term, as the information minister has said might be a possibility - these were men he trusted to continue his "Bolivarian Revolution.
WORLD
October 8, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
CARACAS, Venezuela - Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and his supporters on Monday celebrated his reelection, while many in the country wondered whether his victory could result in improved relations with opposition parties after a decade of bitterness and division. Chavez, who captured 55% of the vote Sunday to handily beat challenger and former Miranda state Gov. Henrique Capriles, who received 44%, indicated via Twitter that he'd had a good postelection talk with his opponent.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Paul West
Is Venezuela's cancer-ridden strongman Hugo Chavez a serious threat to the national security of the United States? Mitt Romney thinks so.  And the Republican presidential candidate sharply attacked President Obama on Wednesday for appearing to think otherwise - a hard-line salvo likely to resonate loudest in the southern part of the swing state of Florida, where conservative Cuban Americans are a potent voting bloc. What Obama actually stated, in a brief White House interview this week with a Spanish-language radio and TV journalist, did not, on its face, appear all that incendiary.
WORLD
April 7, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
When Elbert Santiago, a poor messenger service employee and father of three, heard about a chance to trade up from his "hole" of a slum apartment to a place a short stroll from the presidential palace, he didn't think twice. After all, the price was the same for both places: practically nothing. Santiago is a squatter, one of the army of poor who with the encouragement of leftist President Hugo Chavez have taken over an estimated 155 office, apartment and government buildings here in the Venezuelan capital.
OPINION
September 30, 2010
The results of Venezuela's National Assembly elections this week demonstrate once again that it is wise for opposition groups to participate in political competitions, even when the odds are heavily stacked against them. In 2005, opponents of President Hugo Chavez tried to discredit the Assembly election by boycotting it, leaving the arena to the populist leader's loyalists. This time, they ran candidates under the banner of the Table for Democratic Unity and won 61 of the 165 Assembly seats, denying Chavez the two-thirds majority he had used to rewrite fundamental laws, appoint Supreme Court justices and consolidate power.
WORLD
April 14, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis
Venezuela's interim president, Nicolas Maduro, squares off Sunday with Miranda state Gov. Henrique Capriles in an election that will decide who will complete the term of Hugo Chavez, who died March 5 after designating Maduro as his political heir. Voters will be influenced by how they fared under Chavez's Bolivarian Revolution, which reduced poverty but also brought rampant inflation, soaring crime and food shortages. Here is a snapshot of Venezuala after 14 years of Chavismo. Economy: Pressing issues include a 20% inflation rate, a ballooning government deficit and a dearth of investment.
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