Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBomber
IN THE NEWS

Bomber

BUSINESS
January 26, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lockheed Martin Corp. and Boeing Co., the top two U.S. defense contractors, formed a team to explore whether to submit a bid to design and build a new long-range bomber for the Air Force. The Air Force aims to develop the "Next Generation Bomber" by 2018, Boeing and Lockheed said.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | From Reuters
A French Jaguar bomber crashed near a country inn Thursday, slightly injuring 16 people, police said. The two pilots ejected safely just before the plane crashed by a crowded swimming pool outside the inn, at Baux de Provence, near the Mediterranean port of Marseilles.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Times Square returned to business as usual as police investigating the explosion at a military recruiting center looked at dozens of security videotapes, hoping to identify the bicycle-riding bomber. Among the videos was one showing a hooded cyclist pedaling toward an area where a bicycle was found ditched in the trash, and another with someone walking away from the same spot, police said. Investigators suspect the bike -- a 10-speed in good condition -- may have been used by the bomber in the attack just before dawn Thursday on a landmark military recruiting station.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2001
"If we don't build more B-2s we don't have obvious alternatives," says Loren Thompson of the Lexington Institute ["Military Backers in House Urge Bush to Revive Stealth Program," Jan. 13]. Thompson goes on to say the B-52 is not stealthy and can't penetrate hostile airspace and questions how much longer it can fly. No mention of the B-1 bomber. Why are 96 modern high-performance, penetrating tactical bombers left out of the bomber mix? The B-1 can fly a few feet off the ground to penetrate hostile territory at near supersonic speed; the B-2 can't.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1991
In response to "Stealth Makes Power Usable Again," Commentary, June 30: Tom Clancy's belief that the B-2 bomber will "make power usable again" is more than a flight of fancy--it is ludicrous. What Clancy proposes for the $650-million bomber is a new form of gunboat diplomacy that the United States does not need. What the United States desperately needs is a comprehensive, concise, and consistent foreign policy, and not new missions for the nation's strategic weapons systems. The supposition that the B-2 can deter Third World conflicts or acts of international terrorism are without foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995
Re "New B-2 Bomber Funds Give Lift to Southland," Dec. 2: Why not call it what it is? Nearly half a billion dollars for more B-2 bombers in 1996 and another $15 billion likely down the line add up to a gigantic federal welfare program. The beneficiaries--people who usually want the government to get off their backs. So the Antelope Valley will prosper, 25,000 people will keep their jobs and Northrop will profit--all at the expense of the nation's taxpayers who will foot the bill for a still-unproven aircraft designed to fight the evil Soviet empire (now collapsed, remember?
WORLD
December 16, 2009 | By Laura King
With political tensions running high in advance of President Hamid Karzai's expected announcement this week of his new Cabinet, a suicide car bomber struck in the heart of Afghanistan's capital on Tuesday, killing eight people and injuring more than 40 others. Officials said the target may have been former Vice President Ahmed Zia Massoud, whose house was heavily damaged in the attack. Massoud is the brother of Ahmed Shah Massoud, a much-revered leader of the anti-Taliban resistance who was assassinated in 2001, just before the Sept.
WORLD
December 19, 2009 | By Alex Rodriguez
A suicide car bomber Friday attacked a mosque next to a police headquarters in northwest Pakistan and killed at least 11 people, the latest in a wave of retaliatory violence engineered by militants battling Pakistani troops along the Afghan border. Troops are wrapping up a military offensive in South Waziristan aimed at routing the Pakistani Taliban and dislodging Al Qaeda militants from hide-outs there. The military has succeeded in taking control of the region, but most Taliban and Al Qaeda commanders and militants have fled to neighboring districts in the tribal areas, including Kurram and Orakzai.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Todd Martens
Rolling Stone editors have updated the publication's current article on alleged Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev with a statement explaining the reasoning behind using a cover photo of Tsarnaev that has drawn extensive criticism online and off.  Tsarnaev appears on the front of the magazine's Aug. 1 issue, next to a headline that reads, "The Bomber: How a Popular, Promising Student Was Failed by His Family, Fell Into Radical Islam and...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|