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Bombings El Salvador

NEWS
February 12, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
At least six people were killed, including five children, in a Salvadoran air force bombing raid on a refugee settlement, witnesses said. Fierce ground fighting between guerrillas and government troops preceded the bombing, but the guerrillas had not been inside the settlement, witnesses said. One witness reported 20 injured, in addition to the six dead, who were believed to be from the same family.
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NEWS
February 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
El Salvador's army sent out new U.S.-supplied aircraft on their first combat run, bombarding a rebel stronghold to the north of the nation's capital of San Salvador, the army and radio reports said. "We have information that the army has begun a major bombardment in the general area of Guazapa Mountain," a military spokesman said. Guazapa Mountain, 12 miles north of downtown San Salvador, has been one of the main rebel strongholds throughout the 11-year civil war. On Tuesday, the U.S.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Leftist rebels, continuing their biggest military campaign in a year, Thursday fired mortar shells at an army garrison in the town of San Miguel, killing at least five Salvadoran soldiers, the armed forces said. The assault brought the death toll in the fighting since Monday to 89, including at least 38 soldiers, according to government figures. At least 300 people have been wounded, including 164 army troops, official figures show.
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The civil war in El Salvador accelerated sharply this week, with widespread leftist guerrilla attacks resulting in the deaths of at least seven people in a two-day period and a rocket assault on an American government office. A guerrilla was also killed.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist leader Ruben Zamora on Wednesday accused the army of killing two members of his small Popular Social Christian Movement and dumping their bullet-riddled bodies along with a third victim in the western provincial capital of Sonsonate. The killings are the latest in a three-week wave of political violence that has taken the lives of at least 17 civilians since the U.S.-backed government of President Alfredo Cristiani and leftist guerrillas held peace talks in Costa Rica last month.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the heaviest urban fighting in eight months, leftist guerrillas launched simultaneous attacks on a dozen military positions throughout the capital Saturday night. Radio reports said rebels of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front attacked the residences of U.S.-backed President Alfredo Cristiani and Ricardo Alvarenga, president of the right-wing National Assembly. It is not known if they were home at the time.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of civilians waving white flags fled their embattled neighborhoods Tuesday as the armed forces declared an around-the-clock curfew in one-third of metropolitan San Salvador and stepped up aerial strafing of guerrilla positions. Panic erupted in several neighborhoods as word spread that the army was preparing to move against the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front rebels who had staked out positions in public housing complexes.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Leftist guerrillas said they will withdraw from cease-fire talks later this month with the Salvadoran government to protest the bombing of a union hall that killed 10 people and wounded at least 29 this week. In a radio broadcast, the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front guerrillas accused the military of being responsible for the attack on the National Federation of Salvadoran Workers in San Salvador.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As fighting intensified around guerrilla strongholds in the Salvadoran capital Wednesday, a thunderous explosion shook the roomful of slum dwellers holed up in a Catholic mission called St. Mary of the Poor in Santa Marta. A rocket-propelled grenade, apparently aimed at a rebel bunker 50 yards away, crashed into the gray, concrete-block shelter, wounding two children and two adults among 150 people already driven from their shacks, witnesses said.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
El Salvador's lengthy civil war appeared to have moved into a new stage Wednesday after at least four powerful bombs were set off in affluent neighborhoods of San Salvador, the capital, late Tuesday. Half a dozen people were injured in the blasts, and damage to nearby shops and restaurants was reported to be extensive. The explosions marked the addition of a new type of urban terrorism to the already brutal battles that have been fought largely in the countryside and smaller cities.
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