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Bombings Iraq

NEWS
November 9, 1996 | Associated Press
After taking a second look, the Pentagon concluded Friday that Iraqi antiaircraft batteries had turned their radars on U.S. warplanes last Saturday and Monday, justifying retaliatory missiles fired by the aircraft. A Pentagon statement said both F-16 pilots had indications on their control panels that Iraqi antiaircraft radar had "locked on" to the planes. The F-16s were flying patrol missions over southern Iraq as part of a long-standing operation blocking Iraqi flights.
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NEWS
September 7, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. military aircraft are expected to face heightened risks in patrolling the newly expanded "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq despite this week's missile attacks against Iraqi air defenses, Clinton administration officials and defense analysts said Friday. Although the two salvos of cruise missiles that U.S.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
A bomb exploded in a prayer room at Iraq's Ministry of Religious Affairs on Wednesday, killing a senior civil servant and seriously injuring five people. No one claimed responsibility, and official media reports did not identify any specific group. But the official Iraqi news agency INA said the bomb was locally made. Iraqi television blamed "agents hired by the enemies of Iraq," usually considered to be a reference to Kurdish separatists or Iranian-linked Shiite Muslim rebels.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Iranian warplanes crossed into Iraq and bombed two Iranian rebel bases Monday, injuring two Iraqi civilians, rebels said. Iran's official news agency, IRNA, said the air raid against strongholds of the People's Moujahedeen, or People's Warriors--who have fought since the 1980s to oust Iran's hard-line Islamic regime--was aimed at "terrorist counterrevolutionaries" and killed or wounded a number of them.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The clincher in concluding that Iraq sponsored the car bomb attempt on George Bush's life was that the huge explosive device seized by authorities bore striking similarities to a bomb linked to Iraqi agents in Turkey during the Persian Gulf War, government sources said Saturday night. FBI interviews of all 14 plot participants also buttressed the forensic evidence and the conclusion that Iraq directed the attempt, a Justice Department official said.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
President Saddam Hussein on Monday visited Iraq's intelligence headquarters, which was hit last week by U.S. missiles, Iraqi television reported. The main evening news showed a uniformed Hussein talking and laughing with intelligence chief Sabir Abdel-Aziz Douri in a salon at the sprawling intelligence compound. As usual, classical music covered their voices. It was Douri's first public appearance since June 27, when U.S.
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | Reuters
A U.S. Air Force warplane on Saturday night fired at an antiaircraft missile site in southern Iraq after the missile radar locked onto the American plane, the Pentagon said. Air Force Lt. Col. Dave Garner, a Pentagon spokesman, said an antiaircraft missile was apparently fired later from an Iraqi missile site at two other U.S. jets. All three jets returned undamaged, he said. The incident occurred in a "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allied forces missed roughly half the intended targets in their strike on Iraq, according to a Pentagon assessment Thursday. But Bush Administration officials declared the mission a success because of the political message it sent to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. Pentagon spokesman Pete Williams said Wednesday's attack "blew up parts" of four air-defense sites that had served as Baghdad's eyes and ears in the south but left three mobile air-defense missiles there intact.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By choosing a limited strike against Iraqi antiaircraft missiles and command complexes, the United States avoided the potentially more costly political and military consequences of more sweeping action. And leading the list of such troubling consequences might have been rifts within the alliance enforcing the United Nation's resolutions against Iraq and the possibility of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein holding captured allied pilots on Inauguration Day.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's conservative congressmen on Wednesday praised President Bush's decision to launch a limited air strike against Iraq, but several suggested he should have ordered the action earlier, or taken it further. "I have to take my hat off," said freshman Rep. Jay C. Kim (R-Diamond Bar), who represents Yorba Linda and other parts of northern Orange County. "I'm supporting (Bush) 100%.
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