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NEWS
April 22, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Agency for International Development is seeking a new partner to distribute American aid to victims of a 1998 terrorist bombing here, after the failure of the current manager to adequately perform the task. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies will return most of a $3.5-million USAID grant that had been earmarked to provide counseling and educational support for Kenyans in the wake of the August 1998 attack on the U.S. Embassy.
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NATIONAL
October 15, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - A Libyan accused of helping Al Qaeda orchestrate the bombings of U.S. embassies in Africa in 1998 pleaded not guilty to terrorism charges Tuesday, his first appearance in a case highlighting the Obama administration's push to use civilian courts rather than the Guantanamo Bay military prison and drone strikes to nail high-profile terrorism suspects. The defendant, Abu Anas al Liby, whose real name is Nazih Abdul-Hamed Ruqai, entered the courtroom in Manhattan looking far more gaunt than he did in the "wanted" picture circulated by the FBI after his indictment 13 years ago. With sunken eyes, hollow cheeks and a bushy gray and red beard, he appeared older than his 49 years.
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NEWS
October 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A Tanzanian whose house allegedly was used as a bomb factory in last year's deadly attacks on two U.S. embassies in East Africa pleaded innocent to conspiracy charges. The suspect, Khalfan Khamis Mohammed, 26, could face the death penalty if convicted. He was arrested Thursday in Cape Town, South Africa, and flown to the U.S. for trial. Mohammed was named in an indictment stemming from the Aug. 7 bombings in Kenya and Tanzania that killed 224 people.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - U.S. prosecutors say they will bring a captured Libyan terrorism suspect before a judge in New York on Tuesday in a test of the Obama administration's stepped-up effort to use criminal trials, not drone strikes and military prisons, to punish international terrorists. Abu Anas al Liby has been indicted with 20 other accused Al Qaeda operatives on charges of conspiring to kill Americans in the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. A computer expert, he was said to have assembled photographs of the embassies that were used by the bombers.
NEWS
August 11, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last week's terrorist attacks on two U.S. embassies in Africa that seemed unlikely targets have prompted U.S. companies operating overseas to reassess their security precautions in cities not usually associated with terrorism, security experts said Monday. Fears of corporate vulnerability caused the phones to ring off the hooks Monday at international security consulting firms such as Kroll-O'Gara in New York and Wackenhut in Palm Beach, Fla.
NEWS
August 28, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early months of 1996, agents working in the windowless white cubbyholes of the CIA's Counterterrorist Center made a strategic decision. A joint CIA-FBI investigation into the misdeeds of World Trade Center bomber Ramzi Ahmed Yousef had uncovered a treasure of unexpected data about someone the agents concluded was even more dangerous. His name was Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the wake of any apparent terrorist attack, it's always the first question asked: "Who did it?" But amid the blood and debris of Friday's U.S. Embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania, there were depressingly few clues that might point to a culprit. Experts on East Africa came up empty in their initial search for possible suspects or motives within the region.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. government has spent more than $1 billion to turn about 20 of its embassies around the world into state-of-the-art anti-terrorist fortresses, designed to withstand mob violence and car bombs. The buildings in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam are not among them. State Department officials said that, until Friday's deadly bombings in Kenya and Tanzania, neither country was on the department's list of high-danger posts.
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under a towering eucalyptus tree, Alice Nduta Gachiri's two daughters stood straight and tall Saturday as they remembered their mother as a "jolly, generous, sympathetic and welcoming person" whose life was abruptly ripped from her by a terrorist bomb.
NEWS
August 20, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A coalition of extremist Islamic groups linked to a dissident Saudi millionaire has issued new threats against the United States, an Arabic newspaper reported Wednesday. In a statement sent to the Cairo bureau of the Pan-Arab daily Al Hayat, a group calling itself the International Islamic Front for Jihad Against Jews and Crusaders warned that recent "holy struggle operations" against the United States will continue "until all American forces retreat from the Islamic lands."
NEWS
July 11, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Again stating that execution might turn a terrorist into a martyr, a federal court jury Tuesday spared the life of a second man convicted in the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in East Africa that killed 224 people. At the start of their third day of penalty-phase deliberations, the jurors announced that they could not reach agreement on whether Khalfan Khamis Mohamed, a 27-year-old native of Tanzania, should be executed.
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A deeply divided jury Tuesday spared the life of a 24-year-old terrorist convicted of killing 213 people in the 1998 bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya, sentencing him instead to life in prison without parole. In rejecting the death penalty for Mohamed Rashed Daoud al-'Owhali, most of the jurors reasoned that execution would do little to alleviate the suffering of survivors and would make the killer a martyr for the terrorist organization run by Islamic militant Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
May 31, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal prosecutor urged jurors on Wednesday to impose the death penalty on a convicted terrorist who showed such "total lack of remorse" that he posed triumphantly for a photograph after participating in the bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya, that killed 213 people.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | From Reuters
A juror suffering dental pain caused deliberations to be cut short Wednesday in the case against four followers of Saudi dissident Osama bin Laden, charged with plotting to bomb U.S. embassies in Africa. The Manhattan federal jury received the case late May 10. The panel, which is not sequestered and has not met on weekends, is scheduled to resume deliberations today.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal jury in New York ended its third full day of deliberations in the case against four Osama bin Laden followers charged in a plot to kill Americans that included the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. Bin Laden is believed to be the mastermind behind the Nairobi and Dar es Salaam bombings that killed 224 people. Before leaving for the day, jurors asked for evidence involving Ali Mohamed, a former U.S.
NEWS
May 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Jurors in New York weighing the cases of four men accused in the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania concluded deliberations for the week after requesting to review more evidence. The jurors sent U.S.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After claims that the suspect had been tortured and unlawfully detained, a Kenyan high court has stopped the FBI from extraditing a Kenyan mechanic to the United States for further questioning about last year's bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi. The court, in the coastal city of Mombasa, ordered Friday that Ali Mohfoudh Salim be released or brought before a Kenyan court as soon as possible. It also ordered the immigration department to prevent Salim from being taken out of the country.
NEWS
August 18, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elijah Ngito Owino, who worked as a payroll clerk in one of the buildings in downtown Nairobi destroyed by a terrorist bomb, is missing. Two months ago, his wife, Zena Ngito, died of malaria. Their two children, Calvin Biko, 9, and Michelle Ngito, 8, understand that their mom is gone. But they keep asking, "Where's Daddy?" Ten days after bombs aimed at U.S.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lawyer for a naturalized U.S. citizen charged in the bombing of two American embassies in East Africa told a jury Thursday his client served Islamic militant Osama bin Laden as a business advisor and not as a terrorist. "The government has taken dots that don't have numbers and connected it into a picture they want," defense attorney Sam A. Schmidt said in closing arguments on behalf of Wadih El-Hage. "Mr. El-Hage was working like a dog to make money for Bin Laden," Schmidt said.
NEWS
May 2, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prosecutor charged Tuesday that four followers of Islamic extremist Osama bin Laden, on trial for conspiring to bomb two U.S. embassies in East Africa, participated in an "evil horror" that demands accountability. In his closing argument, Assistant U.S. Atty. Kenneth Karas labeled the terrorist attacks "unspeakable acts that ended the lives, the hopes and dreams of hundreds of people."
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