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Bombings Kenya

NEWS
May 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal jury in New York ended its third full day of deliberations in the case against four Osama bin Laden followers charged in a plot to kill Americans that included the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. Bin Laden is believed to be the mastermind behind the Nairobi and Dar es Salaam bombings that killed 224 people. Before leaving for the day, jurors asked for evidence involving Ali Mohamed, a former U.S.
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NEWS
January 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A Saudi on trial in the deadly 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa asked a judge in a closed hearing in New York to throw out his confession, arguing in court papers that American interrogators threatened to hang him "like a dog" if he did not cooperate. Federal prosecutors say Mohamed Rashed Daoud Al-'Owhali admitted hurling a stun grenade at a guard outside the embassy in Nairobi, Kenya, just before a bomb exploded, killing more than 200 people.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Two Egyptian men suspected of conspiring with Osama bin Laden in the bombings of two U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania were given away by their fingerprints, a prosecutor said as the two made their first appearance in a London court. The fingerprints of Ibrahim Hussein Abdel Hadi Eidarous, 42, and Adel Mohammed Abdul Almagid Bary, 39, were found on originals of faxes that claimed responsibility for the bombings, the prosecution said.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
The two African nations where U.S. embassies were bombed have had good relations with the United States and seemed unlikely places for terrorist attacks. Kenya and Tanzania find themselves caught up in an investigation to determine the source and motivation for the dual bombings Friday that killed scores of people and injured more than 1,700.
NEWS
September 8, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Africans have been dying this summer on the battlefields of Congo. They have been dying at the border between Ethiopia and Eritrea, in South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal province and in simmering conflicts in Angola, Burundi, Guinea-Bissau, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan and Uganda. It took South African President Nelson Mandela, the continent's premier statesman, two weeks just to get Africa's leaders to sit at the same table to talk peace in Congo.
NEWS
August 29, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A second suspect in the bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Kenya has admitted he belonged to a terrorist organization headed by exiled Saudi extremist Osama bin Laden, according to an FBI complaint unsealed Friday, and has accepted responsibility for the loss of life in the blast. Mohammed Saddiq Odeh denied that he was directly involved in the Aug. 7 explosion and in the almost simultaneous bombing of the American Embassy in Tanzania.
NEWS
August 7, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a miracle that Lucky Wavai was ever born. His mother, seven months pregnant, was seriously injured in last year's bombing of the U.S. Embassy here when chunks of glass were blasted into her stomach. She wanted to terminate the pregnancy because she feared that her baby was already dead. Today, Lucky's right limbs remain slightly paralyzed. Doctors fear possible brain damage. And loud noises terrify him.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of this nation's Islamic community accused the United States on Monday of pressuring Kenyan authorities to clamp down on Muslim organizations, which they say are wrongly suspected of possible involvement in last month's bombing of the U.S. Embassy here. The outcry by Muslim leaders follows last week's decision by the government to ban 16 primarily Muslim organizations for security reasons and for allegedly overstepping their permitted activities.
NEWS
August 15, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snow-capped Mt. Kilimanjaro stands sentinel over the vast plains of the Serengeti and the Masai Mara, where lions roar, elephants thunder and buffalo slip sloppily and gratefully into water holes. For tourists and adventurers, there's no place like it. But in the wake of the Aug. 7 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, safari operators have been inundated with a wave of what one called "panic cancellations," almost all of them from Americans.
NEWS
August 12, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing anti-American sentiment in the Kenyan press has begun to worry U.S. officials, who say they will take steps to counter it. Daily newspapers here have begun to accuse Americans of rejecting the help of Kenyan volunteers and attending to their own wounded at the expense of Kenyans after last week's devastating bomb blast at the U.S. Embassy. Local media have also lambasted Washington for issuing an advisory urging U.S. citizens to stay away from this East African nation.
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