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July 7, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A close associate of two of the men implicated in the Oklahoma City bombing said after a short appearance before a federal grand jury Thursday that he believes he has become a target of the government investigation. Jim Rosencrans, a 29-year-old gun enthusiast from Kingman, Ariz., said that he testified for less than five minutes before the grand jury investigating the April 19 blast that killed 168 people at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.
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NEWS
July 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A state appellate court ruled that trying Terry L. Nichols on state murder charges for the Oklahoma City bombing does not violate his right against being tried twice for the same offense. It ruled that Nichols, convicted of federal bombing charges and sentenced to life in prison, can also be tried in state court on 160 counts of first-degree murder for the 1995 bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building.
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NEWS
July 6, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Indicating that authorities are moving toward charging Michael Fortier in the bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building, a close associate of Fortier and of suspect Timothy J. McVeigh has been called to testify today before a grand jury about how the bombing may have been financed. James Rosencrans, a next-door neighbor of Fortier's in Kingman, Ariz., allegedly sold a rare rifle that had been stolen from an Arkansas gun collector on Nov. 5. The collector, Roger E. Moore of Royal, Ark.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At 7:14 a.m., watched by 10 victims here and hundreds more on closed-circuit television in Oklahoma, Timothy J. McVeigh was executed Monday by the government he hated. The Oklahoma City bomber died silently and with his eyes wide open, leaving it to the prison warden to distribute an English poem McVeigh had copied in his small, neat hand-lettering. "I am the master of my fate," it read. "I am the captain of my soul." He signed it, simply, "Tim."
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"That man. Over there. In the blue shirt." With those eight words, the owner of a Kansas truck-rental agency identified Timothy J. McVeigh on Friday as the man who rented the Ryder truck that carried the bomb that killed 168 people when it exploded near an Oklahoma City federal building. Eldon Elliott, who runs Elliott's Body Shop in Junction City, Kan.
NEWS
May 6, 1995 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 16 days of waning hope and gnawing doubt, a time that had seemed both instantaneous and interminable, one of the nation's most agonizing rescue missions on Friday finally, mercifully, came to an end. Like a skeleton picked clean of flesh, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building had given up all of the bodies it was going to relinquish. There were no more search teams combing the rubble. There were no more hydraulic shovels removing slabs of concrete.
NEWS
May 3, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in the trial of Timothy J. McVeigh presented evidence and testimony Friday that suggested McVeigh and Terry L. Nichols made two large purchases of highly explosive ammonium nitrate fertilizer in the months before the 1995 bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Edye Smith Stowe was in the kitchen with her husband and her parents when the call came from the doctor's office. She was pregnant. In seconds, the entire family was weeping, and a new chapter had begun in one of the most poignant stories to come out of the Oklahoma City bombing. Stowe was just 23 when the destruction of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building took the lives of her two sons, Chase, 3, and Colton, 2. Now, she has a new husband and the baby is due this winter.
NEWS
April 25, 1995 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the eager conservative Republicans who swept into Washington on an anti-government tide last fall has been caught up in the far-reaching fallout surrounding the Oklahoma City bombing. Freshman Rep. Steve Stockman (R-Tex.) has been thrust into the limelight to explain how he received an anonymous fax about the bombing and his own links to anti-government militia groups.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Government investigators have put together a reconstruction of the moments before the Oklahoma City bombing, which indicates that the fuse attached to the bomb was lit inside the rental truck even before the Ryder vehicle came to a stop in front of the federal building. According to sources close to the case, the re-creation was done with the help of at least two video cameras located near the Alfred P.
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On their face, many of the more than 4,000 pages of FBI files recently given to defense attorneys in the Oklahoma City bombing case seem clearly worthless. But also buried in these dozens of boxes are personal letters from convicted mass killer Timothy J. McVeigh, an interview with his father and other witness statements--nuggets that McVeigh's attorneys might have found useful in preparing his defense. The value of the new material lies at the heart of McVeigh's fate.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
Timothy J. McVeigh's attorney said he received several hundred more pages of FBI materials Wednesday. The disclosure was the first indication the FBI has found hundreds more documents since it first admitted two weeks ago that it had discovered 3,135 pages that were supposed to have been given to McVeigh's lawyers before his trial. Nathan Chambers, McVeigh's attorney, said Wednesday's delivery was the fourth since the FBI disclosed that it had turned up new documents.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The FBI has unearthed still more documents in the Oklahoma City bombing investigation, despite ordering its agents 16 times in recent years to turn over "everything and anything" connected to the case, Director Louis J. Freeh disclosed Wednesday. An embarrassed Freeh, in his first public comments on a controversy that has forced the postponement of Timothy J.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Outgoing FBI Director Louis J. Freeh, under fire over the mishandling of thousands of pages of documents in the Oklahoma City bombing, plans to ask Congress today for tens of millions of dollars in new funds to plug holes in the agency's outdated computer technology, according to documents obtained by The Times. The request underscores what will likely be the FBI's main defense in the unfolding controversy over the Timothy J.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal law enforcement officials revealed Thursday that they had found about 3,000 pages of FBI materials that had been mislaid in the Oklahoma City bombing case, and defense attorneys for Timothy J. McVeigh immediately said they hope to win a stay of his execution scheduled in just five days.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
Church bells chiming "Amazing Grace" ended 168 seconds of silence Thursday, one second for each of the victims of the Oklahoma City bombing six years ago. Relatives of the victims gathered for prayer and reflection at the Oklahoma City National Memorial, where the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building once was. There were no dignitaries or choirs this year, mainly just victims' relatives and survivors of the 1995 blast.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Timothy J. McVeigh was found guilty Monday of the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history and jurors now will decide whether the 29-year-old former soldier should die for bombing the Oklahoma City federal building two years ago. At 1:34 p.m., U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch read the verdict to a hushed and crowded second-floor courtroom in downtown Denver: guilty on each of the 11 counts of the indictment.
NEWS
May 24, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-government activist James D. Nichols received a low-key welcome home to Michigan's "thumb" region Tuesday from a small group of friends, neighbors and fellow farmers who tended his crops while he was in custody on federal explosives charges and as a possible material witness in the Oklahoma City bombing. Nichols tearfully told reporters earlier in the day that he wanted "to try to get my life back together" by returning to his farm chores.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft plans to announce today that survivors and relatives of those killed in the Oklahoma City bombing will be allowed to view the execution of Timothy J. McVeigh through closed-circuit television, Bush administration officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
A remorseless Timothy J. McVeigh calls the children killed in the Oklahoma City bombing "collateral damage," regretting only that their deaths detracted from his bid to avenge the Branch Davidian raid and Ruby Ridge, according to a new book. Details in the book mark the first time McVeigh has publicly and explicitly admitted to the crime and given his reasons for the attack. "I understand what they felt in Oklahoma City.
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