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Bombings Oklahoma

ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1997 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal officials and Oklahoma state authorities are girding for a potential battle over the right to execute Oklahoma City bomber Timothy J. McVeigh, with sources inside the federal prosecution saying Tuesday that they have no intention of turning him over to the state legal system if he is sentenced to death in federal court.
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NEWS
March 4, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Timothy J. McVeigh's lawyer acknowledged Monday that his files contain a report in which his client claimed responsibility for the Oklahoma City bombing, but attorney Stephen Jones flatly and angrily denied that it is a confession, as portrayed last week by a Dallas newspaper. Instead, Jones asserted that the report is part of the defense team's internal work product and is "not a legitimate defense document."
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | From Associated Press
A writer who has advanced conspiracy theories about the bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building surrendered Tuesday to face charges that he tried to influence a grand jury investigating the blast. Complaining that he is being persecuted for "speaking the truth," David Hoffman, 38, reported to the Oklahoma County Jail, three weeks after being indicted by the grand jury. Hoffman, who was released from jail later Tuesday, could get two years in prison if convicted on the misdemeanor charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1995 | LESLIE EARNEST
When Oklahoma City bombing victim Daina Bradley visits the city Dec. 4 to thank those who have helped her, Laguna Beach High School will be her stage to speak to the community. Bradley and members of her family were in the Oklahoma City federal building on April 19 when a bomb exploded, killing 168 people, including Bradley's two children and her mother. To free Bradley from the debris, rescuers had to amputate her right leg.
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | from Associated Press
The judge who tried the white supremacists charged in the slaying of radio talk show host Alan Berg was appointed Monday to handle the Oklahoma City bombing case, replacing a judge whose chambers were damaged in the blast. U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch, a 65-year-old ex-prosecutor appointed to the Denver bench by then-President Richard Nixon, was assigned the case by the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals. The appellate court Friday ordered U.S.
NEWS
August 9, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wife of Michael Fortier, a close friend of accused bomber Timothy J. McVeigh, testified Tuesday before a federal grand jury here as authorities neared completion of their four-month investigation of the federal building explosion. As one of the panel's final witnesses, Lori Fortier spoke to the grand jury for about two hours behind closed doors at the grand jury's secret meeting room at Tinker Air Force Base.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After two months of investigation, federal authorities believe that they have identified the "John Doe No. 2" in the Oklahoma City bombing case--but that he probably had nothing to do with the attack, The Times learned Tuesday. Investigators located and questioned the man several days ago--but rather than finding a leading accomplice of bombing suspect Timothy J.
NEWS
August 15, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Timothy J. McVeigh was formally sentenced to death Thursday, moments after reciting from memory an obscure quotation from a 1928 Supreme Court opinion about the proper role of government in America. Fashioning himself as an anti-government crusader even after his conviction in the Oklahoma City bombing, the 29-year-old McVeigh addressed the U.S. District Court in a new military-style buzz haircut and a drab, cream-colored jail uniform.
NEWS
April 24, 1995 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The intense focus now descending on the militantly anti-government, anti-gun control militia movement could present Republican leaders with some of the same problems that confronted Democrats as extremist groups flourished on the left during the 1960s. When the Weatherman and Black Panther movements erupted into public view at the tail end of the 1960s, their violent acts politically damaged not only the anti-war and civil rights causes but ultimately the Democratic Party.
NEWS
April 29, 1995 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 16th Infantry Regiment here boasts a long and distinguished combat record. It fought at Manassas and Gettysburg. It was the first unit to hit Omaha Beach on D-Day in 1944. It has earned its motto: "Always Ready." But the 16th's storied history is in the process of adding an embarrassing footnote. For the last week, a small army of FBI agents has swarmed over the tree-lined, campus-like setting of Ft.
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