Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBombings Scotland
IN THE NEWS

Bombings Scotland

NEWS
December 30, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
FBI agents, searching for a motive and suspects in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103, fanned out Thursday in several U.S. cities asking about passenger identities and cargo that had been carried in the jumbo jet for delivery here. The investigation "is certainly at the top of our list of priorities," said Milton Ahlerich, the FBI's assistant director for congressional and public affairs. Ahlerich, indicating the magnitude of the case, said that U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crowds marched through Libya's streets in staged demonstrations Wednesday to protest U.N. sanctions against their country, and Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi threatened to withhold oil from countries that join the embargo. "Whoever does not support the cause of my people will have nothing: no oil and no business," Kadafi told the Italian weekly magazine Europeo. The Libyan Foreign Ministry challenged the legality of the U.N.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | Reuters
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi discussed his Lockerbie impasse with the West on Saturday in talks with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak that are expected to last at least one more day, presidential sources said. Kadafi will hold a news conference at the end of his talks with Mubarak on Monday, Egyptian Information Minister Safwat Sharif said. The Libyan leader is due to leave Egypt on Friday. There was no further word about the progress of the talks. The U.N.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
Moammar Kadafi, defiantly rejecting U.N. demands to hand over suspects in the 1988 Pan American Airways bombing, sought Saturday in a fiery speech to rally Muslims worldwide to Libya's defense. "Our stand is clear. We will not let go of our sovereignty. Libyan law cannot be violated without death," the Libyan leader, dressed in a cream-colored suit and cape and waving his fists, told a crowd of about 3,000 people in Tripoli's main plaza. Some shouted "Jihad!"--holy war--in response.
NEWS
March 25, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Arab League delegation, testing the sincerity of Libya's offer to turn over two men wanted in the bombing of Pan American Flight 103, flew to Tripoli on Tuesday while the U.S. government kept up its drumbeat of doubts. "History would suggest that we should be skeptical that this is indeed a good-faith offer," said Margaret Tutwiler, the State Department spokeswoman.
NEWS
January 2, 1989 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher distanced herself on Sunday from U.S. vows to punish whoever planted the bomb that destroyed Pan Am Flight 103. "I don't think an eye for an eye and tooth for a tooth is ever valid," she said in a wide-ranging New Year's television interview. "The most important thing to do is to try to get the cooperation of all nations to track these people down so that they are brought to justice," she said on the "David Frost on Sunday" program.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Libyan government Wednesday invited the French judge who recently accused senior Libyan officials of masterminding the 1989 bombing of a French airliner to visit Libya so they can answer his charges. Attorneys representing the Libyan government said they will guarantee the safety of the investigative magistrate, Jean-Louis Bruguiere, if he goes to Libya.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bombing of a Pan Am jet three years ago triggered substantially tighter security at airports, federal officials said Thursday, but a big gap remains: a machine to detect the kind of plastic bomb that blew up Flight 103. Metal detectors and X-ray machines have been upgraded, security people have received better training, baggage checking procedures have been strengthened and more fences have been built around radar towers and other sensitive facilities.
NEWS
February 11, 1992
The United Nations may slap sanctions on Libya this week for failing to produce two security agents accused of blowing up Pan Am Flight 103 over Scotland in 1988. The British, Americans and French are preparing a resolution calling on governments to prohibit all flights to Libya, stop all arms sales, and reduce the number of diplomats in Tripoli. While there may be some resistance, American officials hope the resolution can win a strong majority in the Security Council. Libyan leader Col.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With events justifying its skepticism, the Bush Administration pressured the United Nations on Wednesday to impose sanctions on Libya after the government of Moammar Kadafi reneged on a pledge to turn over the two suspects in the Pan American Airways Flight 103 terrorist bombing. But diplomats were uncertain when the Security Council will take up the American-British-French resolution aimed at punishing Libya.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|