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Bombings Yemen

NEWS
October 29, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Patrick Howard Roy and Lakeina Monique Francis, two of the 17 sailors killed in the Oct. 12 bomb attack on the U.S. guided missile destroyer Cole in Yemen, were buried Saturday. Roy's burial at Antietam National Cemetery in Sharpsburg, Md., was the first in 22 years at the cemetery, where most of the graves are those of Civil War soldiers.
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NEWS
October 28, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lunchtime scene here Friday at the Sailor's Club reflected the fear, hope and sorrow that the Cole will leave behind this weekend when a U.S. heavy tug is scheduled to maneuver the crippled U.S. warship to a Norwegian salvage vessel. Business has been brisk at the restaurant, a half-century-old British colonial relic whose view of the damaged Cole has drawn crowds.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Security was beefed up around a hotel in Aden on Thursday after a bomb threat targeted Americans staying there who are investigating the attack on the U.S. guided missile destroyer Cole. Yemeni security officials said the bomb threat by an unknown caller came about midnight. Yemeni and U.S. security officials held an emergency meeting before dawn. They surrounded the hotel with military vehicles mounted with machine guns and prevented civilian traffic from getting within 500 yards of the site.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. intelligence agencies have detected a specific threat that a suicide bomber might try to drive a vehicle loaded with explosives onto a runway under a U.S. aircraft in Bahrain, as well as terrorist threats to American embassies there and in nearby Qatar, a U.S. intelligence official said Wednesday. The threats were deemed credible enough that the Pentagon on Monday ordered U.S.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly two months they welded, they waited, they watched and they prayed.
NEWS
October 25, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With U.S. officials increasingly confident that they will soon determine who bombed the warship Cole, policymakers and national security officials here are beginning to consider how best to meet President Clinton's vow to hold the perpetrators "accountable." Officials said they have not ruled out any option, from a missile strike against those who orchestrated the attack to a covert military operation to snatch suspects and bring them to trial.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. ambassador to Yemen said Saturday that the hunt for those responsible for the suicide bombing of the guided missile destroyer Cole was expanding but was far from reeling in any suspects in the Oct. 12 blast that killed 17 sailors and wounded 39. "I will tell you that we are a long way from any conclusions. We are a long way from any preliminary conclusions," Barbara Bodine said. "There are a lot of rumors going around, but . . .
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The terrorist bombing of the Cole occurred almost two hours after the U.S. warship had finished docking in Yemen last week, not during the mooring procedure when it was surrounded by small work boats, the Navy said Friday. The revised account of the sequence of events leading up to the Oct. 12 bombing is significant because it calls into question one of the key initial assumptions about the event.
NEWS
October 20, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER and DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. Navy on Thursday recovered the last four bodies of American sailors from the disabled destroyer Cole, as the retired military commander who had approved the policy of refueling ships in Yemen told a Senate panel that the danger level, while high, was "actually better than we had elsewhere" in the region.
NEWS
October 19, 2000
To repair the $1-billion guided missile destroyer Cole, the Navy will first have to have it transported from the waters of Yemen to Norfolk, Va. The Navy awarded a $4.5-million contract to a Norwegian company to carry the 8,600-ton ship aboard the firm's huge heavy-lift vessel Blue Marlin. The Cole Sophisticated sonar equipment is housed inside a rubber dome on the bow, which will hang off the Blue Marlin's deck so it will be protected.
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