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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1993 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a fleeting moment in an early frame of CBS' miniseries "Love, Honor and Obey: The Last Mafia Marriage," the real Rosalie Bonanno can be seen at her 1956 wedding to Bill Bonanno, who would become his father's consigliere. Amid clinking of good crystal and toasting of the young couple led by Ben Gazzara--who plays Joe Bonanno, Mafia chieftain and boss of bosses--the trimly elegant reddish-haired woman gazes respectfully as he shouts, "A la Famiglia. " To the Family.
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NATIONAL
January 23, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Prosecutors say Vincent Asaro expected to get rich off the infamous heist of about $6 million in cash and jewels from a Lufthansa vault in 1978, a crime that unleashed a murderous spree by a paranoid mobster and inspired Martin Scorsese's film "Goodfellas. " He didn't. "We never got our right money," Asaro is accused of grousing to an FBI informant in an expletive-laced conversation recorded in 2011. But Asaro did get arrested and charged Thursday as the FBI unsealed an indictment detailing allegations that he planned the record-breaking heist and was involved in other crimes dating back decades, including murder, arson and illegal gambling.
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NEWS
August 27, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors Wednesday launched an unprecedented attack on the far-flung business operations of a leading Mafia "family," seeking to strip its interest in a Teamster local, gambling properties, hotels and a taxi company. In its first attempt to enjoin an entire organized crime unit, the government in a civil lawsuit also urged a federal court to bar members of the Bonanno family from illegal activities, business dealings with each other and from "making" new members.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2004 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
As crime bosses go, Joseph Massino has been strictly old school, a wiseguy more wary than wild in a city that turns reputed mob leaders into celebrities. Unlike John Gotti, who loved fancy clothes, flashy cars and media attention, the alleged head of the Bonanno crime family has long shunned the spotlight. But as Massino prepares to stand trial this month on seven murder charges -- a case that is being billed as one of New York's great mob trials -- notoriety is about to engulf him.
NEWS
August 12, 2001 | LARRY McSHANE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Giuseppe Bonanno arrived at his uncle's Brooklyn home in 1924, he surveyed a land of infinite opportunities. The immigrant youth quickly took advantage. Known in his new home as Joe, the precocious teen began bootlegging liquor. He fell in with a "family" of fellow Sicilians involved in wider-ranging criminal activity; within seven years, he was their boss. Under his leadership, the family grew into a massive, multimillion-dollar enterprise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joseph Bonanno, the notorious gangster known as "Joe Bananas" who ran one of the nation's most powerful Mafia groups in the 1950s and '60s, died Saturday in Tucson. He was 97. Bonanno, who retired to Arizona in 1968 and had suffered from several health problems in recent years, died of heart failure, said his attorney, Alfred "Skip" Donau. He died peacefully, surrounded by his family, Donau said.
NEWS
July 1, 1991
Philip (Rusty) Rastelli, 73, the Mafia boss whose marriage was as turbulent as any mob war. Rastelli had been boss of the Bonanno crime family, one of the city's five Mafia groups, and presided over its virtual disintegration during the 1980s. His wife, Connie, was gunned down in 1962 after she told federal agents that her playboy husband was a drug trafficker. Once, upon learning that her husband had taken up with another woman in Canada, Mrs.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2004 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
As crime bosses go, Joseph Massino has been strictly old school, a wiseguy more wary than wild in a city that turns reputed mob leaders into celebrities. Unlike John Gotti, who loved fancy clothes, flashy cars and media attention, the alleged head of the Bonanno crime family has long shunned the spotlight. But as Massino prepares to stand trial this month on seven murder charges -- a case that is being billed as one of New York's great mob trials -- notoriety is about to engulf him.
NATIONAL
January 23, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Prosecutors say Vincent Asaro expected to get rich off the infamous heist of about $6 million in cash and jewels from a Lufthansa vault in 1978, a crime that unleashed a murderous spree by a paranoid mobster and inspired Martin Scorsese's film "Goodfellas. " He didn't. "We never got our right money," Asaro is accused of grousing to an FBI informant in an expletive-laced conversation recorded in 2011. But Asaro did get arrested and charged Thursday as the FBI unsealed an indictment detailing allegations that he planned the record-breaking heist and was involved in other crimes dating back decades, including murder, arson and illegal gambling.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Meredith Blake, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It wasn't until the fourth grade that Jennifer Graziano, creator and executive producer of the VH1 reality series "Mob Wives," suspected that her father, Anthony Graziano, might be in an unusual line of work. "The teacher was going around the class, and everybody was reciting what their parents did for a living," Graziano, now 38, recalls. "I was like … 'I don't know what my father does.' And I didn't. I really didn't. " Graziano may have been in the dark about her father's alleged Mafia connections — according to prosecutors, he was for years the consigliere of New York's Bonanno crime family and is currently in prison — but these days Graziano has not only accepted her family's checkered past, she's used it to make the leap into a career as a television producer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joseph Bonanno, the notorious gangster known as "Joe Bananas" who ran one of the nation's most powerful Mafia groups in the 1950s and '60s, died Saturday in Tucson. He was 97. Bonanno, who retired to Arizona in 1968 and had suffered from several health problems in recent years, died of heart failure, said his attorney, Alfred "Skip" Donau. He died peacefully, surrounded by his family, Donau said.
NEWS
August 12, 2001 | LARRY McSHANE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Giuseppe Bonanno arrived at his uncle's Brooklyn home in 1924, he surveyed a land of infinite opportunities. The immigrant youth quickly took advantage. Known in his new home as Joe, the precocious teen began bootlegging liquor. He fell in with a "family" of fellow Sicilians involved in wider-ranging criminal activity; within seven years, he was their boss. Under his leadership, the family grew into a massive, multimillion-dollar enterprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1993 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a fleeting moment in an early frame of CBS' miniseries "Love, Honor and Obey: The Last Mafia Marriage," the real Rosalie Bonanno can be seen at her 1956 wedding to Bill Bonanno, who would become his father's consigliere. Amid clinking of good crystal and toasting of the young couple led by Ben Gazzara--who plays Joe Bonanno, Mafia chieftain and boss of bosses--the trimly elegant reddish-haired woman gazes respectfully as he shouts, "A la Famiglia. " To the Family.
NEWS
July 1, 1991
Philip (Rusty) Rastelli, 73, the Mafia boss whose marriage was as turbulent as any mob war. Rastelli had been boss of the Bonanno crime family, one of the city's five Mafia groups, and presided over its virtual disintegration during the 1980s. His wife, Connie, was gunned down in 1962 after she told federal agents that her playboy husband was a drug trafficker. Once, upon learning that her husband had taken up with another woman in Canada, Mrs.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors Wednesday launched an unprecedented attack on the far-flung business operations of a leading Mafia "family," seeking to strip its interest in a Teamster local, gambling properties, hotels and a taxi company. In its first attempt to enjoin an entire organized crime unit, the government in a civil lawsuit also urged a federal court to bar members of the Bonanno family from illegal activities, business dealings with each other and from "making" new members.
MAGAZINE
April 14, 1996 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer Paul Lieberman has covered organized crime for more than two decades. His last story for the magazine was on the New England mob's bid to enter Hollywood
In the parlance of their trade, the Beverly Hills robbers were "professionals." They had staked out the 21-room mansion for weeks, even conducting dress rehearsals during which they crept along the service alley and climbed the 7-foot-high wrought-iron fence--masks, gloves and radios at the ready. They knew there was a staff of two--the butler and his wife--and that, each night, the butler headed toward North Elm Drive to walk the dog, a Belgian Schipperke. This night, Jan.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | LARRY McSHANE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They appeared in the courtroom barely 30 feet apart, the notorious past and noxious present of the Bonanno crime family. At the defense table sat a stand-up guy: Anthony Spero, reputed Bonanno consigliere, placidly sucking a fruit-flavored Life Saver. His face betrayed no emotion during his racketeering trial last March. Spero, 72, wore a dark, conservative suit and tie. During a lifetime in the Mafia, Spero kept his mouth shut, even while serving a two-year extortion rap.
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