Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBone
IN THE NEWS

Bone

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1994
I'm sorry that Christopher Knight is tired of lead, bone, glass and the like as art materials ("This Critic Has a Bone to Pick," Nov. 6). It seems like just a few years ago that it was at least acceptable to put pencil to paper or paint to canvas, as long as it was done with honesty and passion. Now we are being told we have to throw away our clothing, pedestals and rust and look for new materials to please the jaded critic. While I too deplore cliche, do we really need to be given a list of forbidden materials?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 15, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON -- After a grueling 48-hour drive from Montana, the capital's latest transplant -- a 38-foot long, 66 million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton -- got to rest its bones Tuesday at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. The Smithsonian's newest acquisition is one of the largest and most complete specimens in the world, and it will be the museum's first real T. rex skeleton on display. “What could be more fabulous than welcoming a Tyrannosaurus rex to Washington D.C.?
Advertisement
SCIENCE
March 25, 2010 | By Amina Khan
Tyrannosaurs may have stalked far more of the globe than previously thought. Scientists for the first time have found evidence of an ancestor of Tyrannosaurus rex in the Southern Hemisphere, a discovery that could shed light on tyrannosaurs' evolutionary lineage, which many scientists had thought was restricted to the Northern Hemisphere after the continents began to separate. Tyrannosaurs had been documented only in Asia, Europe and North America, but a hip bone discovered in Australia could have come only from a tyrannosaur, researchers have concluded.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Trishna Patel
On a warm, picturesque California day at the beach, it's hard to walk more than five feet without seeing someone with a camera or mobile phone.  After all, the Instagram sunset possibilities are endless… But last Tuesday on the Huntington Beach Pier, photographer Ramon Ambriz stumbled upon an unusual sight that would soon rival filtered sunset pictures everywhere.  Sitting on the back of a chained bike was a skeleton wearing a bikini and a...
WORLD
June 24, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
In a small, dark room in this city of narrow alleys and workshops the size of shoeboxes, five men in their 70s fashion combs out of water buffalo horn with hand saws for $2 a day. "It's very hard work," said Abdul Bashir, 70. "But I've got to eat. " Members of this predominantly Muslim community of 50,000 have hacked, chipped, cut, molded and polished animal bones and horns into baubles or beads for generations. But the ornaments worn on the supple wrists and suntanned necks of far-off fashionistas carry a high price for these craftsmen, who must live with airborne clouds of bone dust that sticks to their eyes, hair and lungs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989
What's all the fuss about Guns N' Roses? In the '60s, they would have been a third-billed, warm-up act at the Fillmore. Really. DON FLEETWOOD Duarte
SCIENCE
March 25, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Two halves of the same turtle's arm bone were discovered almost 200 years apart, according to a new study.  A fossil miracle? Totally. "When two pieces of a fossil fit together, they fit perfectly like a puzzle piece," said Jason Schein, an assistant curator of natural history at the New Jersey State Museum, who was in the room when the two bone halves were first reunited. "We were just kind of dumbfounded. " You can see pictures of the two halves in the gallery above, as well as an artist's rendering of the giant sea turtle (with a human diver for scale)
BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
George Thorogood is m-m-m-m-mad. The '80s rocker filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles against Michaels Stores Inc., accusing the retailer of selling T-shirts that infringed on the trademark he holds for "Bad to the Bone," the title of his 1982 smash hit. Michaels, which operates a chain of arts-and-crafts stores, sells products to make a "Bad to the Bone tee" on its website. Officials with the Texas-based retailer did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) , shot in the head in a Tucson parking lot in January, will undergo surgery Wednesday to replace the segment of her skull that was removed by surgeons at University Medical Center in Tucson. Surgeons there cut out a large segment of the skull to allow room for swelling of the brain, a common aftermath of trauma to the head. The bone was frozen to keep it viable until it could be reattached to her skull. In the interim, Giffords has been wearing a protective helmet to prevent injuries to her brain from falls during her rehabilitation at Memorial Hermann Texas Medical Center in Houston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1993
My daughter and I wish to extend our thanks for telling your readers about our plea for bone marrow donors. It was a big help in catching the attention of the public as well as informing many of our friends who were not aware of our plight. So far, we have not found a matching donor. However, we will keep in touch and keep you abreast with the latest happening or the outcome. Again, our profound thanks and prayers for more power to your media. TERISITA R. HACUMAN Port Hueneme
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
British writer David Mitchell's next novel will be "The Bone Clocks," publishing on Sept. 9, 2014, his publisher Random House told the L.A. Times on Monday. The announcement includes new details about "The Bone Clocks" as well as news of a three-book deal with Mitchell, a two-time Booker Prize finalist. "The Bone Clocks" will be, Random House writes, "a stunning epic that follows Holly Sykes, who runs away from her home in Southwest England in 1984 and 60 years later is raising her granddaughter on the coast of Ireland, as almost everything about her world has changed forever.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Nobody really vanishes into thin air. But that's more or less what happened to Inez Garcia on Nov. 2, 1952, when she stepped out of her husband's car in Santa Fe, N.M., never to be seen again. That, at least, is what Juan Andres Jose Garcia said.  Inez Garcia, 26, left four young children, now in their 60s, who have spent decades wondering what happened to their mother. They may soon have an answer. Santa Fe police announced Friday that this month they dug up bones that may be human, buried in a free-standing garage that Garcia's husband had jealously guarded from intruders before his death in the 1990s.  "When [ Juan Andres Jose Garcia]
HOME & GARDEN
March 28, 2014 | By Kyle Schuneman
Features such as fireplaces and wood beams not only look good in a room, they also provide a focal point for decorating. But many apartments lack these architectural elements and instead offer just plain white walls, boxy rooms and open, undefined spaces. In my 1960s-era unit, for example, living, dining and kitchen areas blend together and lack definition. Temporary plaid wallpaper was a solution in the living room. But the dining room was proving to be a challenge. The only feature in the room was a single pendant hanging from the ceiling.
SCIENCE
March 25, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Two halves of the same turtle's arm bone were discovered almost 200 years apart, according to a new study.  A fossil miracle? Totally. "When two pieces of a fossil fit together, they fit perfectly like a puzzle piece," said Jason Schein, an assistant curator of natural history at the New Jersey State Museum, who was in the room when the two bone halves were first reunited. "We were just kind of dumbfounded. " You can see pictures of the two halves in the gallery above, as well as an artist's rendering of the giant sea turtle (with a human diver for scale)
SCIENCE
March 25, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Young men who exercise keep some of the benefits to their bones into old age, even if they don't keep at it, according to researchers who compared the throwing arms and the nonthrowing arms of professional baseball players over time. Bone mass, size and strength increase with physical activity in youth, but it was unclear whether those benefits carried into later years. The researchers looked at the arms of 103 pro baseball players -- major and minor leagues -- and at the arms of 94 “regular” men; they reported their findings in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
SCIENCE
March 25, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Unusual rib bones that grow out of the neck are giving scientists new clues about what caused the woolly mammoth to become extinct roughly 10,000 years ago. The so-called cervical ribs - extra rib bones that protrude from the vertebrae at the base of the neck - were about 10 times more common in mammoths living in the Late Pleistocene than they are in elephants alive today, according to a study by Dutch researchers published Tuesday in the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2009 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
A bone fragment recovered from the backyard of a home next door to suspected kidnappers Phillip and Nancy Garrido appears to be from a human, the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Department said Tuesday. Sheriff's spokesman Jimmy Lee said an independent expert determined that the bone is "probably human," and investigators are sending it to the state DNA lab for further testing. Officials are hoping the state "can develop a DNA profile on the fragment," Lee wrote in an e-mail statement Tuesday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Daughter of Smoke and Bone A Novel Laini Taylor Little, Brown Books for Young Readers: 418 pp., $18.99, ages 15 and up It isn't only an indisputable truth that opposites attract. In young-adult fiction, it's almost de rigueur. So it is with the kickoff to a new series from National Book Award finalist Laini Taylor, in which the most contrarian characters imaginable - an angel and a devil - fall in love. It's to Taylor's great credit that evil incarnate and its love match in "Daughter of Smoke and Bone" are such imaginative interpretations and that the worlds in which this romance unfolds are likewise so unique: Telling a tale this apocryphal requires serious outside-the-box plot work to pull off. Taylor manages her self-imposed challenge with aplomb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Martha Groves
Seventy feet below Wilshire Boulevard, cater-corner from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's street-lamp installation, fresh air roaring from giant ventilation pipes dulled the sickly sweet smell of petroleum. Amid the clatter of jackhammers and the whine of a mini-excavator, paleontologist Kim Scott scouted the tarry muck for relics from a long-buried beach. She had plenty of choices. Major construction on the highly anticipated Westside subway extension won't begin until next year, but an exploratory shaft dug at the corner of Ogden Drive to assess soil conditions for future stations and tunnels has burped up a bonanza of prehistoric swag.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2014 | By Matt Cooper
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of March 9-15, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies   SERIES The Bachelor Juan Pablo makes his choice on the season finale, followed by "The Bachelor: After the Final Rose. " 8 and 10:01 p.m. ABC Bones The forensics drama returns with new episodes; "24's" Freddie Prinze Jr. guest stars. 8 p.m. Fox The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills The docu-soap wraps another season.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|