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Bone Marrow Transplants

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeanne Larner is pleading with her medical insurance company to pay for a bone-marrow transplant she believes will greatly increase her odds of conquering a fast-growing brain tumor. "All I need is a chance, and I can get better," said Larner, 24, who is under treatment at Children's Hospital of Orange County, a medical center with expertise in bone-marrow transplants. Larner's physician, Dr.
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BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
All the amenities of modern medicine are available at a new West Los Angeles hospital. There's 24-hour emergency care, a team of surgeons, psychology and physical therapy units, MRI and CT machines, one of the top oncologists in the country. Medical assistants busily roam the halls, soothing patients' fears with smiles, kind words or gentle touches. But they have to watch out: The patients can bite. They're dogs, cats and other pets being treated at the VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, which at 42,000 square feet is the largest pet hospital west of the Mississippi River.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1990 | SONNI EFRON
Hanh Truong's well-wishers lined up like lottery players Tuesday, each baring a vein on the 1-in-100,000 chance that the young man could be kept alive. The 29-year-old computer programmer is suffering from acute lymphocytic leukemia, a bone-marrow cancer. He has been given only a 30% chance of survival unless he receives a bone-marrow transplant within the next two years.
SCIENCE
July 3, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Two HIV-positive lymphoma patients who received bone marrow transplants to treat their cancer no longer have detectable virus in their blood cells - even after stopping antiretroviral therapy in recent weeks, researchers reported Wednesday at the International AIDS Society Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. While saying it was too early to declare the men cured, Dr. Timothy Henrich and Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, both of the division of infectious diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, called the results “exciting” and said they would help guide scientists' efforts to fight HIV.  But bone marrow transplants are highly unlikely to become a standard therapy for people with HIV, Henrich said in an interview with The Times.
SCIENCE
July 3, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Two HIV-positive lymphoma patients who received bone marrow transplants to treat their cancer no longer have detectable virus in their blood cells - even after stopping antiretroviral therapy in recent weeks, researchers reported Wednesday at the International AIDS Society Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. While saying it was too early to declare the men cured, Dr. Timothy Henrich and Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, both of the division of infectious diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, called the results “exciting” and said they would help guide scientists' efforts to fight HIV.  But bone marrow transplants are highly unlikely to become a standard therapy for people with HIV, Henrich said in an interview with The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1998
New techniques may improve the chances of successful bone marrow transplants in cancer patients who do not have good tissue matches with donors. About 30,000 such transplants are performed in the United States each year. They are a potentially lifesaving treatment of last resort for some victims of leukemia and other types of cancer, but about 25% of patients cannot have transplants because doctors are unable to find a closely matched donor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996
Bone marrow transplants are no more effective than conventional chemotherapy in increasing the survival rate of children suffering from acute myeloid leukemia, according to researchers at the Children's Hospital of Michigan. A multi-center team randomly gave standard chemotherapy to 117 children and bone marrow treatments to 115 others in the hopes of curing their leukemia, which is caused by cancerous white blood cells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. Robert A. Good, 81, who performed the world's first successful human bone marrow transplant, died Friday of natural causes at his home in St. Petersburg, Fla. A native of Crosby, Minn., Good decided to become a doctor at age 6 when his father died of cancer. The youth survived his own serious illness, a polio-like disease, during his student years at the University of Minnesota.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1989 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to save the lives of two 17-year-old high school seniors, Brea Community Hospital is sponsoring a drive to find bone marrow donors who might be able reduce the 1-in-20,000 odds of finding a suitable match. Both Anissa Ayala of Walnut and Brandon Oba of Brea found out last year they have chronic leukemia, a fatal cancer of the blood that is progressive and curable only by bone marrow transplants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1996 | MARY F. POLS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 8-month-old Blayke LaRue, the blood that will be dripped into his veins this morning will be just another inconvenience, another tube coming out of him, another obstacle to hamper him from playing and crawling. But that blood, a mere two ounces, could save the Oxnard baby's life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
E. Donnall Thomas, a physician who pioneered the use of bone marrow transplants in leukemia patients and won the 1990 Nobel Prize in medicine, died Saturday in Seattle of heart disease. He was 92. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, which Thomas joined in 1974, announced his death. Thomas' work is among the greatest success stories in the treatment of cancer. Bone marrow transplantation and its sister therapy, blood stem cell transplantation, have improved the survival rates for patients with some blood cancers to around 90% from almost zero.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
Episcopal Bishop J. Jon Bruno, head of the six-county Los Angeles diocese, has been diagnosed with leukemia and is undergoing aggressive treatment to fight the disease. The 65-year-old bishop said in an open letter that he had been suffering from what he thought was a bout of pneumonia since March. He underwent further tests after treatment failed to cure the "nagging problem. " Doctors at Good Samaritan Hospital discovered that Bruno had acute monocytic leukemia, a form of blood cancer.
HEALTH
August 11, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
In a potential breakthrough in cancer research, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have genetically engineered patients' T cells — a type of white blood cell — to attack cancer cells in advanced cases of a common type of leukemia. Two of the three patients who received doses of the designer T cells in a clinical trial have remained cancer-free for more than a year, the researchers said. Experts not connected with the trial said the feat was important because it suggested that T cells could be tweaked to kill a range of cancers, including ones of the blood, breast and colon.
HEALTH
June 5, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
To many of the nation's million people living with a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS, Timothy Brown is the Harry Potter of the disease: Like the young wizard who survived Lord Voldemort's wrath, he is the boy who lived. Today, almost 20 years after he became infected, Brown is, essentially, cured. Brown, now 45, is known in medical-journal circles as "The Berlin Patient," a moniker assigned him by a February 2009 case study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In a "Brief Report," oncologist Gero Huetter and his colleagues at Berlin's University Hospital described the unique stem-cell transplant of an HIV-infected patient — Brown — who had acute myeloid leukemia, and the remarkable result: Twenty months after the procedure, the virus had not reappeared in Brown's body, even though he was no longer taking antiretroviral drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Ernest McCulloch, who with biophysicist James E. Till was the first to isolate and identify a stem cell, opening the door immediately to bone marrow transplants and eventually to what researchers believe will be a host of treatments for a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from spinal cord injuries to Alzheimer's, died Jan. 20 in Toronto, just two weeks shy of the 50th anniversary of the publication of the pair's seminal discovery. He was 84. "It's impossible to overstate the enormity of Till's and McCulloch's discovery and longtime collaboration," Dr. Christopher Paige of the Ontario Cancer Institute, where the pair worked, said in a statement.
SCIENCE
August 21, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
Clad in a yellow gown, blue foot covers, hair net, face mask and latex gloves, Paula Cannon pushed open the door to the animal room. "I hate this smell," she said, wrinkling her nose. The stink came from scores of little white mice scurrying about in cages. Some of the cages were marked with red biohazard signs, indicating mice that had been injected with HIV. Yet, in some of the animals — ones with a small genetic change — the virus never took hold. Like mouse, like man?
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Medical researchers in Los Angeles County intend to begin testing bone-marrow transplantation as a treatment for some AIDS patients, in light of a case in which a man appeared to have been purged of the AIDS virus after physicians replaced his bone marrow.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Soviet pilot suffering a pre-cancerous condition because of his heroic flights to staunch radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear plant underwent a transplant of bone marrow rushed from a French donor on Friday. Four years and a day after the Chernobyl disaster, marrow donated by a 42-year-old woman was flown to Seattle on Friday for transfusion into Anatoly Grishchenko. The marrow arrived at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on a British Airways flight originating in Paris.
SCIENCE
December 10, 2009 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Researchers have for the first time performed a successful bone marrow transplant to cure sickle cell disease in adults, a feat that could expand the procedure to more of the 70,000 Americans with the disease -- and possibly some other diseases as well. About 200 children have been cured of sickle cell with transplants, but the procedure was considered too harsh for adults with severe sickle cell disease. Now a team from the National Institutes of Health and Johns Hopkins University is reporting today in the New England Journal of Medicine that it has developed a much-less-toxic transplant procedure and used it to cure nine of the first 10 patients studied.
SPORTS
November 6, 2009 | Ben Bolch
Luke Gane had to be there, even at his own peril. For weeks the Huntington Beach Edison High football player had pestered his doctors about attending last year's Chargers' "Battle for the Bell" game against archrival Fountain Valley. Playing wasn't an option. Gane had been sidelined for the entire 2008 season by a rare blood disorder, and his doctors had ordered him to stay away from crowds because it put his weakened body at risk of infectious diseases. Finally, the junior lineman struck a deal with his physicians: He would wear a mask and stay at least 50 yards away from the crowd.
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