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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Daughter of Smoke and Bone A Novel Laini Taylor Little, Brown Books for Young Readers: 418 pp., $18.99, ages 15 and up It isn't only an indisputable truth that opposites attract. In young-adult fiction, it's almost de rigueur. So it is with the kickoff to a new series from National Book Award finalist Laini Taylor, in which the most contrarian characters imaginable - an angel and a devil - fall in love. It's to Taylor's great credit that evil incarnate and its love match in "Daughter of Smoke and Bone" are such imaginative interpretations and that the worlds in which this romance unfolds are likewise so unique: Telling a tale this apocryphal requires serious outside-the-box plot work to pull off. Taylor manages her self-imposed challenge with aplomb.
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SPORTS
April 6, 2010
CLEVELAND — All-Star forward Chris Bosh was flattened by an inadvertent elbow from Cleveland's Antawn Jamison in the first quarter and suffered a broken bone in his face Tuesday night as the Toronto Raptors, battling Chicago for the final postseason spot in the Eastern Conference, were beaten, 113-101, by the Cavaliers, who have won 11 straight at home. The Raptors, one game ahead of the Bulls for No. 8 in the East, said tests showed Bosh had suffered a "maxilla and nasal fracture to the right side of his face."
NATIONAL
December 26, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
A thief remains at large after pulling off a daring heist -- in the pet food aisle. Surveillance video at a supermarket in Murray, Utah, caught a dog shoplifting, KSL-TV reported Wednesday. The video showed the dog walking in the front door and heading straight to Aisle 16, pet food. It grabbed a bone worth $2.79 and fled. The store manager confronted it, to no avail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1986 | United Press International
Scientists looking for ways to keep astronauts in good physical condition on extended journeys into space have developed a device they say might help earthbound people who suffer from bone problems. Scientists at the Ames Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration reported this week that the instrument can detect osteoporosis, thinning of the bones, a disease that strikes many elderly people.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL
Except for her assaultive, engulfing woman's quartet "Coriolanus," the pieces presented by Stephanie Gilliland at Cal State L.A. on Friday proved far too thoughtful and complex for her program title, "Raw and to the Bone." This locally based postmodernist clearly identifies with the risk-oriented, stamina-testing movement theater gathering converts in the community.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | JANE SUTTON, United Press International
The mysterious serpent Christopher Columbus slew during his first voyage to the New World was probably a crocodile--not a giant iguana as previously suggested, a zoological archeologist has determined. The finding is based on the discovery last summer of a crocodile bone amid the ruins of a Bahamian village believed to be one that Columbus visited.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Amgen Inc.'s experimental drug denosumab worked as well as Novartis' Zometa in preventing fractures in patients with advanced cancers whose disease had spread to their bones, the company said. The 1,776-patient trial found that denosumab reduced the risk of fractures and other bone complications as effectively as Zometa, Amgen said. Amgen, based in Thousand Oaks, is seeking approval in the U.S. and Europe to sell the drug to treat osteoporosis.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Among the epigrams that introduce "Bone by Bone" is a line from John Keats: "A man's life of any worth is a continual allegory, and few eyes can see [its] mystery." The man in question--at least for Peter Matthiessen--is Edgar J. Watson, a sum of more parts than many Southerners combined. The descendant of a proud line extending back beyond the Confederacy to Thomas Jefferson, Watson was born at Clouds Creek, S.C., on Nov. 7, 1855, and died on the shore of Chokoloskee, Fla.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
The discovery of a 60,000-year-old, two-inch neck bone in a cave in Israel, reported in today's issue of the British journal Nature, suggests that modern man's brutish predecessor, the Neanderthal, may have had the physical capacity to speak. The conclusion--drawn by a group of Israeli, French and American archeologists--has provoked sharp reactions from other scientists and has rekindled a long-simmering controversy over the origin and evolution of human language. But Baruch Arensburg and his colleagues in Israel contend that the tiny U-shaped fossil, which was discovered in the Kebara Cave at Mt. Carmel, closely resembles its counterpart, known as the hyoid bone, in modern humans.
SPORTS
September 16, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
So the mysterious bone bruise wasn't the problem after all. With his bruise healed but his pain persisting, sidelined closer Jonathan Broxton has decided to undergo a minor elbow operation Monday to shave down a bone spur and remove loose bodies. Broxton went on the disabled list in early May, when an MRI exam showed he had a bruised elbow and bone spur. Figuring the bruise was responsible for Broxton's pain, team physician Dr. Neal ElAttrache prescribed rest. The two-time All-Star made enough progress to pitch in a couple of minor league games in July, but had to be shut down when the pain returned.
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