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Bones

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1998
A group of hunters discovered a human skull and other bones in a remote part of the woods near Aliso Canyon Road in Acton on Saturday, sheriff's officials said. The age and gender of the remains have yet to be determined, Deputy Bob Killeen said, adding that "the remains are believed to be human." Hunters found the skeletal remains about 2 p.m. in a mountainous and wooded area about four miles east of Soledad Canyon Road, Killeen said.
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HEALTH
January 29, 2007 | Mary Beckman
A study reported last week that people who take anti-depressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) put themselves at greater risk for fractures. Researchers are working to understand how depression and its therapies affect skeleton strength. One thing they know: Several hormones and neurotransmitters affect, to varying degrees, the building and breaking down of bone. --- From the outside, bones look stiff, unyielding, unchanging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Women who have outwardly normal menstrual periods may lose bone rapidly if they do not ovulate during every monthly cycle, a study concludes. Lack of menstruation, such as occurs in women who exercise strenuously or do not eat enough, has long been associated with weakened bones. But until now, experts assumed that women who menstruated regularly also produced hormones that kept their bones healthy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bones found buried at a Canyon Country home were not human remains, coroner's investigators determined Thursday. "After examination, they were confirmed to be nonhuman," county coroner spokesman David Campbell said. Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies discovered the animal bones Wednesday after responding to a call about explosives and shots fired on a property in the 14800 block of Sierra Highway, Deputy David Cervantes said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1992 | MIMI KO
Costa Mesa police don't believe that bones found in Indio last February belong to a missing Newport Beach woman, but an anthropologist who studied the remains says there is a strong possibility that they do. Denise Huber, 23, vanished 14 months ago after dropping off a friend at his Huntington Beach home. According to police, the two had just attended a concert in Inglewood. Huber was last seen at about 2 a.m. on June 3, 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2006 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
By the time you reach 13,000 or so, you'd figure that the people closest to you would know some fundamental personal details -- like your sex. But consider the plight of the oldest person yet found in North America. All that remains of him -- or is it her? -- are a couple of thigh bones, which were discovered on Santa Rosa Island in 1959. At the time, scientists thought they belonged to a man of a certain age -- perhaps 10,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2001 | MIKE PETERS, GREELEY TRIBUNE
Not much has changed on the Pawnee National Grassland in 35 million years, scientists say. There was more precipitation then, about 25 inches annually compared with 15 today, and there were more trees. The rolling hills would have been much the same, with taller grass and a warmer climate. Instead of the treeless prairie of today, there were clusters of trees 35 million years ago--walnut, maple and cottonwood. But the real change in this land is with the animals.
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | From Associated Press
Two new studies confirm that taking hormones after menopause can strengthen women's bones, perhaps heading off fractures in old age, researchers say. However, a third study in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. found that older women with the strongest bones appear to have the highest risk of breast cancer. That finding may raise suspicions that estrogen supplements promote cancer, but outside experts quickly cautioned against that assumption.
SCIENCE
July 17, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archeologists have unearthed a cooking hearth at a site in the Sierra where they believe the Donner Party gathered for meager meals in the months before starvation led to the country's most infamous tale of cannibalism. Government and university researchers said Wednesday that bone fragments they located appeared to be large enough to allow for DNA testing to determine whether they were human.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Bone fragments found near the desert campsite where Laura Bradbury was last seen more than four years ago apparently are the remains of the missing Huntington Beach child, authorities said for the first time Wednesday. Acknowledging that a sophisticated DNA analysis, known as "genetic fingerprinting," had been performed on the skull fragments, the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department said that the genetic composition of the fragments was "consistent with Laura Bradbury."
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