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NEWS
June 21, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty-six years after it lay smoldering in the ruins of the Third Reich, Berlin reclaimed its glory as the capital of Germany when Parliament voted 337 to 320 Thursday to abandon Bonn and "complete the unification" process. After 11 marathon hours of debate, weary lawmakers decided to gradually move the Bundestag, or lower house of Parliament, and the seat of government to the country's historic capital over the next 10 to 12 years.
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TRAVEL
August 28, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ever since my mom gave me the complete works of Ludwig van Beethoven - the best birthday present I ever got - I'd wanted to make a pilgrimage to Bonn, the composer's birthplace, to soak up the atmosphere and look for clues to his genius. Forty years later, I finally showed up. Bonn, in northwestern Germany, is way off the beaten tourist track, but I'm glad I made the effort. I spent four days in May absorbing Beethoven's legacy, the city's friendly ambience, Rhine River vistas and liberal quantities of Riesling wine and kolsch, as the local beer is called.
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NEWS
April 20, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cream of Germany's political elite will gather Tuesday in Bonn to agree on the ground rules for a debate likely to shape much of the nation's long-term future. The debate will determine whether the recently reunited Germany is ruled from Berlin, an eastward-looking Prussian metropolis on the cusp of Europe's old East-West divide; or from Bonn, a sleepy, westward-looking university town on the edge of the Rhine that has hosted four decades of German democracy.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | Reuters
The German government began the long-awaited move from its provisional postwar capital of Bonn to its new home in Berlin on Saturday as the first Cabinet minister and his team made the 380-mile journey eastward. Construction Minister Franz Muentefering, who is also in charge of the move, led the way to Berlin. By the end of the summer, Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's government, the 669-member Parliament and 15 ministries will have moved from the Rhine River town of Bonn to Berlin.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | Reuters
The German government began the long-awaited move from its provisional postwar capital of Bonn to its new home in Berlin on Saturday as the first Cabinet minister and his team made the 380-mile journey eastward. Construction Minister Franz Muentefering, who is also in charge of the move, led the way to Berlin. By the end of the summer, Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's government, the 669-member Parliament and 15 ministries will have moved from the Rhine River town of Bonn to Berlin.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bonn Seen as Site for New European Central Bank: Bonn, the former West German capital, is expected to be named the headquarters for the European Community's future central bank this week at an EC summit in Edinburgh, Scotland, the Times of London said. Quoting French and German sources, the newspaper said the bank will go to Bonn as British Prime Minister John Major pursues an operational unit--perhaps dealing with foreign exchange--for London.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | From Reuters
This city, which lost out to Berlin as united Germany's seat of government, was handed a consolation prize Friday when the upper house of Parliament voted, as expected, to stay here for the time being. The small but influential Bundesrat--made up of representatives of Germany's 16 states--voted 38-30 in favor of remaining in this quiet Rhineside town. The powerful lower house, the Bundestag, voted on June 20 to move itself and the government from Bonn to Berlin by the end of the century.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder heralded the "culmination of German unity" Monday as he ushered parliament back to Berlin's radically altered Reichstag, ending the capital's 50 years of exile in a Rhine River village and, perhaps, the stigma of Germany as a threat to world peace.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl called Tuesday for Germany to slowly shift its capital from Bonn to Berlin, saying the city that once tragically symbolized their division is the best place for east and west Germans to now grow together. But in breaking his long silence on the highly emotional issue, Kohl said it would be "a terrible mistake" to attempt to complete such a transition before the year 2000. He added that Bonn should retain some high-profile ministries, such as defense and the postal service.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These should be heady times for Berlin. Its existence as a Cold War flash point has ended, much of the 100-mile wall that divided the city between East and West has disappeared and experts predict that once the federal government returns, the city's population of 3.3 million could quickly double, making the city the most important power center between Washington and Moscow. Only one problem stands in the way of Berlin's rosy-looking future: Bonn.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder heralded the "culmination of German unity" Monday as he ushered parliament back to Berlin's radically altered Reichstag, ending the capital's 50 years of exile in a Rhine River village and, perhaps, the stigma of Germany as a threat to world peace.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bonn Seen as Site for New European Central Bank: Bonn, the former West German capital, is expected to be named the headquarters for the European Community's future central bank this week at an EC summit in Edinburgh, Scotland, the Times of London said. Quoting French and German sources, the newspaper said the bank will go to Bonn as British Prime Minister John Major pursues an operational unit--perhaps dealing with foreign exchange--for London.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | From Reuters
This city, which lost out to Berlin as united Germany's seat of government, was handed a consolation prize Friday when the upper house of Parliament voted, as expected, to stay here for the time being. The small but influential Bundesrat--made up of representatives of Germany's 16 states--voted 38-30 in favor of remaining in this quiet Rhineside town. The powerful lower house, the Bundestag, voted on June 20 to move itself and the government from Bonn to Berlin by the end of the century.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty-six years after it lay smoldering in the ruins of the Third Reich, Berlin reclaimed its glory as the capital of Germany when Parliament voted 337 to 320 Thursday to abandon Bonn and "complete the unification" process. After 11 marathon hours of debate, weary lawmakers decided to gradually move the Bundestag, or lower house of Parliament, and the seat of government to the country's historic capital over the next 10 to 12 years.
NEWS
June 18, 1991
The Bundestag, or lower house of the Parliament, meets Thursday to vote on one of the most divisive issues in unified Germany: whether to keep the country's capital in Bonn or move it to Berlin. Whatever the vote, the decision must be ratified Friday by the Bundesrat, or upper house. Shifting the seat of government would cost billions of marks and take a decade to complete, the government estimates.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl called Tuesday for Germany to slowly shift its capital from Bonn to Berlin, saying the city that once tragically symbolized their division is the best place for east and west Germans to now grow together. But in breaking his long silence on the highly emotional issue, Kohl said it would be "a terrible mistake" to attempt to complete such a transition before the year 2000. He added that Bonn should retain some high-profile ministries, such as defense and the postal service.
NEWS
June 18, 1991
The Bundestag, or lower house of the Parliament, meets Thursday to vote on one of the most divisive issues in unified Germany: whether to keep the country's capital in Bonn or move it to Berlin. Whatever the vote, the decision must be ratified Friday by the Bundesrat, or upper house. Shifting the seat of government would cost billions of marks and take a decade to complete, the government estimates.
TRAVEL
August 28, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ever since my mom gave me the complete works of Ludwig van Beethoven - the best birthday present I ever got - I'd wanted to make a pilgrimage to Bonn, the composer's birthplace, to soak up the atmosphere and look for clues to his genius. Forty years later, I finally showed up. Bonn, in northwestern Germany, is way off the beaten tourist track, but I'm glad I made the effort. I spent four days in May absorbing Beethoven's legacy, the city's friendly ambience, Rhine River vistas and liberal quantities of Riesling wine and kolsch, as the local beer is called.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cream of Germany's political elite will gather Tuesday in Bonn to agree on the ground rules for a debate likely to shape much of the nation's long-term future. The debate will determine whether the recently reunited Germany is ruled from Berlin, an eastward-looking Prussian metropolis on the cusp of Europe's old East-West divide; or from Bonn, a sleepy, westward-looking university town on the edge of the Rhine that has hosted four decades of German democracy.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move certain to strain Soviet-German relations, the Soviet Union has flown former East German Communist leader Erich Honecker from a military hospital outside Berlin to Moscow, ostensibly for emergency medical treatment. Hours after news of Honecker's flight was made public Thursday, the German government demanded his immediate return.
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