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Bonnie And Clyde Movie

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September 26, 2003 | Gene Sullivan, Newsday
Lately, I've found that the only way to get my teenage son focused on a movie older than his 13 years is to make a social occasion out of it. You know, have some of the neighbors over for dinner along with one or two of their own teenagers and then, after the meal, pick out a DVD from the archives. So one such night this summer, I mixed the mango ice cream dessert with a showing of "Bonnie and Clyde."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Gene Sullivan, Newsday
Lately, I've found that the only way to get my teenage son focused on a movie older than his 13 years is to make a social occasion out of it. You know, have some of the neighbors over for dinner along with one or two of their own teenagers and then, after the meal, pick out a DVD from the archives. So one such night this summer, I mixed the mango ice cream dessert with a showing of "Bonnie and Clyde."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1997 | Patrick Goldstein, Patrick Goldstein is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Hollywood lore has it that Warren Beatty would do anything to get "Bonnie and Clyde" made. But did the young movie star really crawl on his hands and knees across the floor of Warner Bros. mogul Benny Kalmenson's office, begging him for the money to make the film? "That's exactly what happened," recalls Dick Lederer, then the studio's head of advertising and publicity. "Trust me, it's not something you could make up. I was there to see it."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1997 | Patrick Goldstein, Patrick Goldstein is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Hollywood lore has it that Warren Beatty would do anything to get "Bonnie and Clyde" made. But did the young movie star really crawl on his hands and knees across the floor of Warner Bros. mogul Benny Kalmenson's office, begging him for the money to make the film? "That's exactly what happened," recalls Dick Lederer, then the studio's head of advertising and publicity. "Trust me, it's not something you could make up. I was there to see it."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | Bryan Burrough, Burrough, a special correspondent at Vanity Fair, is author of "Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34."
Hollywood makes myths and always has, and I guess that's as it should be. Moviegoers want to be entertained, after all, so moviemakers have long burnished history to make it more entertaining. From "Birth of a Nation" all the way up to "Mississippi Burning," "The Untouchables" and the little-remembered CIA-in-Laos film "Air America," the facts of American history have marched off to battle with Hollywood myth and, sadly, at least for me, lost almost every time.
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