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Bonnie Raitt

ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1995 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Veteran Bonnie Raitt and newcomer Sheryl Crow form the key matchup in the nominations for the 37th annual Grammy Awards, announced Thursday in Universal City. Raitt, who dominated Grammy night in 1990, and singer-songwriter Crow, whose early reviews often likened her to Raitt, are competing for record of the year, and both are up for five awards.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1994 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
So how is Bonnie Raitt doing five years after her career-escalating Grammy sweep? Nicely indeed, thank you--as demonstrated in a spirited performance Sunday at the Hollywood Bowl that was all the more disarming because of some surprise father-daughter ties. It's no small achievement. Sudden mass success can be as disorienting for a veteran pop artist--in Raitt's case, coming after almost two decades of struggle--as for someone new to the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1994 | DENNIS HUNT
Who says being PI--politically incorrect--doesn't pay? Tim McGraw has ridden the PI wave all the way to the Top 10. His album, "Not a Moment Too Soon," bolted into the Top 10--No. 8--in just two weeks. What's selling it is his controversial single, "Indian Outlaw," which is in the pop Top 20. Native Americans, naturally, are infuriated by it but, once again, controversy sells records. Bonnie Raitt's "Longing in Their Hearts" inched up a notch to the top of the chart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1994
The "Above the Rim" soundtrack wound up skying above the rest of the competition, slam-dunking at No. 1 on The Times' Southern California pop album chart. The appeal of 2Pac, who's in the movie, probably had a lot to do with its success, but the presence of artists such as H-Town and SWV didn't hurt. Look for Bonnie Raitt's "Longing in Their Hearts," which debuted at No. 3, to be an enduring hit. New Age king Yanni, whose album jumped to No.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1994 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
At 44, an age when many pop-rockers are in the twilight of their careers, Bonnie Raitt exudes the energy and ambition of someone just entering her prime--which she may well be. Pop's most-famous redhead was radiant as she walked into an office at the Capitol Tower in Hollywood to talk about her second album since her recording career was dramatically rejuvenated.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1993 | Richard Cromelin
Youth is where the action is in pop music, right? So if you're starting a new record company, whom would you sign? How about Beach Boys leader Brian Wilson, 51, troubadour and actor Kris Kristofferson, 57, and former Rascals singer Felix Cavaliere--49 and out of the music business for 15 years?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1993 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
T he record industry loses one of its icons today when Joe Smith retires as president and chief executive officer of Capitol-EMI Music. Smith's career roughly spans the rock 'n' roll era. After years as a disc jockey, he spent 1961-1983 as an executive at Warner Bros. Records and Elektra/Asylum Records, where he had an up-close view of the pop culture revolution. Among the acts he helped sign: the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix and James Taylor.
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