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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997
The sun was beating down on the students sitting on the hot pavement of the 112th Street Elementary School playground in Watts, but for most of them, the view was just fine. Their wide eyes were fixed on the bags of new toys piled at the edge of the asphalt, waiting to be distributed. More than 700 toys were donated to the school by the Bonsai Foundation, a nonprofit organization created by the makers of the Might Morphin Power Rangers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997
The sun was beating down on the students sitting on the hot pavement of the 112th Street Elementary School playground in Watts, but for most of them, the view was just fine. Their wide eyes were fixed on the bags of new toys piled at the edge of the asphalt, waiting to be distributed. More than 700 toys were donated to the school by the Bonsai Foundation, a nonprofit organization created by the makers of the Might Morphin Power Rangers.
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NEWS
July 28, 1998 | PATT MORRISON
Imagine anew the moment in "The Graduate" when a man whispers into Dustin Hoffman's ear the magic word, the stuff of the future: not "plastics," but instead, "butterflies." The butterfly business, a raise-and-release trade, is--forgive the wordplay--taking off in California as a new tradition for weddings, funerals and memorials. Hurling rice at nuptials has fallen rather out of favor; dry rice can seriously hurt birds who eat it. Popcorn lends the festivities the air of a movie premiere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2004 | Joy Buchanan, Times Staff Writer
John Yoshio Naka, the world-renowned bonsai master who was credited with bringing the art to Western culture, has died. He was 89. Naka, a resident of Whittier, died Wednesday at Whittier Hospital Medical Center. The cause of death was not announced. Naka was widely regarded as one of the greatest bonsai masters of his time, even in Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2006 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Frank Okamura often began his classes by saying, "I am not licensed to preach in church." That was true. But he made such frequent reference to heaven, Earth and deity that his students could easily imagine they had signed up for a course in religion instead of one on Okamura's specialty: bonsai. Okamura, 94, who died Jan.
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