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Bonus Pay

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BUSINESS
November 12, 2008 | Bloomberg News
U.S. taxpayers, who feel they own a stake in Wall Street after funding a $700-billion bailout for the industry, don't want executives' bonuses reduced. They want them eliminated. "I may not understand everything, but I do understand common sense, and when you lend money to someone, you don't want to see them at a new-car dealer the next day," said Ken Karlson, a 61-year-old Vietnam veteran and freelance marketer in Wheaton, Ill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2010 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
A county audit has found that Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center and the county Department of Health Services overpaid workers tens of thousands of dollars in bonuses, sick pay, disability pay and overtime, and need to do more to monitor over- and underpayments. The audit, which began two years ago and was released last week, found $85,000 in overpayments: At least 15 employees were overpaid $18,500 in bonuses. Twenty-three absent employees were overpaid $9,500 in bonuses.
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NEWS
August 27, 1987 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration has authorized danger pay bonuses for 10,000 servicemen involved in the U.S. naval escort of Kuwaiti oil tankers in the Persian Gulf region, the Pentagon announced Wednesday. The decision will provide an extra $110 a month in "imminent danger" premiums to the men serving on warships in the Persian Gulf, the Strait of Hormuz and a small part of the Gulf of Oman. Also eligible are U.S.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2008 | Bloomberg News
U.S. taxpayers, who feel they own a stake in Wall Street after funding a $700-billion bailout for the industry, don't want executives' bonuses reduced. They want them eliminated. "I may not understand everything, but I do understand common sense, and when you lend money to someone, you don't want to see them at a new-car dealer the next day," said Ken Karlson, a 61-year-old Vietnam veteran and freelance marketer in Wheaton, Ill.
NEWS
May 10, 2007
That Randy Lewis must be a fortune teller [Idol Banter, May 3]. Seeing his accurate predictions of Wednesday's "American Idol" castoffs appear in Thursday's Weekend section was almost amazing. Does Weekend pay Lewis for these predictions? If so, any chance the L.A. Times would print my picks for today's Hollywood Park winners in tomorrow's sports section? RANDY KELLER Redondo Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2000
Re "Wage Incentives for Teachers Will Not Pay Off in the Worst Schools," Commentary, Aug. 21: I am an experienced teacher in a low-performing school. The only way I can qualify for any bonus is based on the school meeting its Academic Performance Index target. It doesn't matter that nearly half the teachers at my school are teaching with emergency credentials. It doesn't matter that I personally have no control over teacher absenteeism. It doesn't matter that I have no control over any other classroom but my own. And even that doesn't when it comes time to handing out student-performance bonuses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacific Symphony musicians won a 14.7% wage increase spread over the next three years under a new contract between Local 7 of the American Federation of Musicians and the orchestra. The musicians also received a $50,000 bonus for signing the contract by the end of August. That breaks down into individual bonuses of between $200 and $900 that were awarded on a prorated basis according to the number of rehearsals and concerts at which each musician played last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999 | CATHERINE SAILLANT
Nurses and psychiatric technicians who work on county mental health crisis teams asked the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday to consider paying them the same bonuses received by colleagues working in the public hospital's psychiatric wing. The work they perform is just as hazardous as the duties performed by hospital-based employees, the workers told supervisors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1991 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embarrassed by disclosures that financially strapped Los Angeles County paid $3 million in employee bonuses last year, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday moved to suspend the controversial pay program. The decision came after Supervisor Gloria Molina delivered an unusual public scolding of Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon for failing to inform her of the "generous" bonus program when supervisors were forced to cut services because of budget problems last month.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1994
Question: I work at a small company with about 25 part-time employees who are paid on an hourly basis. There are only a couple of people on staff. The owner is contemplating opening for business on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2. Will we need to pay twice the regular hourly rate for employees working on those days when the Christmas and New Year's Day holidays are generally observed? --Huntington Beach Answer: No.
NEWS
May 10, 2007
That Randy Lewis must be a fortune teller [Idol Banter, May 3]. Seeing his accurate predictions of Wednesday's "American Idol" castoffs appear in Thursday's Weekend section was almost amazing. Does Weekend pay Lewis for these predictions? If so, any chance the L.A. Times would print my picks for today's Hollywood Park winners in tomorrow's sports section? RANDY KELLER Redondo Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2000
Re "Wage Incentives for Teachers Will Not Pay Off in the Worst Schools," Commentary, Aug. 21: I am an experienced teacher in a low-performing school. The only way I can qualify for any bonus is based on the school meeting its Academic Performance Index target. It doesn't matter that nearly half the teachers at my school are teaching with emergency credentials. It doesn't matter that I personally have no control over teacher absenteeism. It doesn't matter that I have no control over any other classroom but my own. And even that doesn't when it comes time to handing out student-performance bonuses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999 | CATHERINE SAILLANT
Nurses and psychiatric technicians who work on county mental health crisis teams asked the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday to consider paying them the same bonuses received by colleagues working in the public hospital's psychiatric wing. The work they perform is just as hazardous as the duties performed by hospital-based employees, the workers told supervisors.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
FPA Medical Management Inc. won't pay promised bonuses to employees of an Orange doctors organization acquired shortly before FPA filed for bankruptcy, but executives are seeking $2.8 million in bonuses for themselves, workers said. As many as 50 workers at Orange Coast Managed Care Services Inc., bought by FPA in March, have been told they won't get bonuses equaling 25% of their salaries in the wake of FPA's Chapter 11 filing, said Neri Gamble, a claims examiner.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1994
Question: I work at a small company with about 25 part-time employees who are paid on an hourly basis. There are only a couple of people on staff. The owner is contemplating opening for business on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2. Will we need to pay twice the regular hourly rate for employees working on those days when the Christmas and New Year's Day holidays are generally observed? --Huntington Beach Answer: No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacific Symphony musicians won a 14.7% wage increase spread over the next three years under a new contract between Local 7 of the American Federation of Musicians and the orchestra. The musicians also received a $50,000 bonus for signing the contract by the end of August. That breaks down into individual bonuses of between $200 and $900 that were awarded on a prorated basis according to the number of rehearsals and concerts at which each musician played last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1989 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
A group of teachers opposed to bilingual education have forced the Los Angeles teachers union to schedule a vote on a proposal that the union reject a school district offer to pay bonuses of up to $5,000 a year to 4,000 bilingual teachers. If the proposal passes, the Los Angeles Unified School District will find it difficult to continue its bilingual program, which serves the largest number of limited-English-speaking students in the country, district officials said.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many Orange County executives, 1991 was a year when their pay packages came under greater shareholder scrutiny and corporate boards were cautious in handing out cash bonuses and perks. It mirrored a trend statewide of keeping executive compensation in line with a company's financial performance. Of the top 100 county executives on the list of publicly traded companies, one-third of the officers saw their cash compensation remain unchanged or had it reduced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' highly lauded magnet schools are finding themselves in a Catch-22 situation: They are under increasing pressure to hire more bilingual teachers but can't pay them as much as regular campuses with higher minority enrollments. A districtwide shortage of bilingual teachers, coupled with the fact that they can receive a $5,000 bonus at regular schools with higher minority enrollment, has led to stiff competition among campuses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1992 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County supervisors voted without comment Tuesday to reduce a bonus that provided seven extra weeks of pay to elected officials and the chief administrative officer. The cut in perks to top county officials came as the supervisors approved pay raises for 1,820 employees--including sheriff's deputies, middle and upper managers and maintenance engineers.
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