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Booby Traps

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NATIONAL
April 25, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The trip wires rigged to potentially deadly booby traps in a popular Utah recreation area were so slender they were practically invisible to the average eye. But James Schoeffler's eyes are not average. During his tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, it was Schoeffler's job to find such trip wires and dismantle the explosive devices to which they were attached. He never expected to find himself doing the same job in a forest in Utah. Authorities are lauding Schoeffler as a hero after he spotted trip wires to a pair of deadly traps just off Big Springs Trail in Provo Canyon.
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NATIONAL
January 8, 2013 | By Jenny Deam and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
CENTENNIAL, Colo. - James E. Holmes acted with precision as he amassed weapons and ammunition and set up his apartment with explosive booby-traps to siphon authorities from the deadly shooting rampage he planned at a suburban movie theater, the prosecution alleged Tuesday, the second day of the suspected gunman's preliminary hearing. The hearing has offered the deepest look at the prosecution's case against Holmes, 25, charged with 166 criminal counts in the July 20 rampage at the movie theater in Aurora, Colo.
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NATIONAL
April 24, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS -- Just when you thought it was safe to go back on those mountain trails. In a case that has stunned authorities with its ruthlessness, two Utah men have been arrested in connection with a pair of deadly makeshift booby traps set up along a popular hiking trail. One of the traps involved a trip wire triggered to send a 20-pound, spiked boulder swinging into an unsuspecting victim. The other was designed to trip a passer-by into a bed of sharpened wooden stakes. The two suspects, ages 19 and 21, told investigators after being arrested last weekend on suspicion of misdemeanor reckless endangerment that the traps were intended for wildlife.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
AURORA, Colo. -- Members of the defense team of Aurora shooting suspect James E. Holmes gained access to his apartment Wednesday, as other residents of his building waited to return. Daniel King, one of Holmes' public defenders, entered the three-story brick building Wednesday afternoon with two other women to take notes and photographs. They emerged about 45 minutes later to examine the outside of the building  -- the lawn and parking lot cordoned off by yellow crime scene tape and guarded by Aurora police.
OPINION
October 30, 2008 | ROSA BROOKS
Ever since Joe Biden suggested that the world would "test" Barack Obama if he becomes president, the McCain campaign has been hoping to make political hay out of the remark. "We don't want a president who invites testing from the world," John McCain warned voters. But every new president is "tested" by national security crises, some predictable, some not.
NEWS
December 10, 1990
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials are investigating whether street gang members or other deputies mailed a booby-trapped gun to a sergeant, according to Sheriff Sherman Block. The Long Beach Press-Telegram said the investigation centers around the sheriff's Lynwood station, where allegations have surfaced about deputies forming a clique with gang-like characters they call the "Vikings" and harassing superiors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1986 | United Press International
Booby traps planted by Vietnamese forces killed four Thai soldiers along the Thai-Cambodian border during the weekend, the Thai military said Sunday. Three soldiers were killed Saturday while patrolling in Ubon Ratchathani province, 400 miles northeast of Bangkok, the military said. The fourth death occurred in the same area a day earlier as troops were clearing booby traps. Three other soldiers were seriously injured, military sources said.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An assistant U.S. attorney who prosecuted top Asian heroin traffickers received a booby-trapped briefcase in the mail. A .22-caliber pistol inside was rigged to fire when the package was opened, police said. The package was addressed to Assistant U.S. Atty. Catherine Palmer and arrived at the District Court building in Brooklyn. It was disarmed by a city police detective.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Denver man who was beset by burglaries and rigged a shotgun booby trap that killed an intruder in his warehouse will get a deferred sentence for reckless manslaughter under a plea bargain, Dist. Atty. Norm Early said. If a judge approves the deal, Philip Connaghan, 46, will spend no time in jail and his record will be cleared if he has no further run-ins with the law, Early said.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Matt Stevens and Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
AURORA, Colo. - The robot snaked methodically through the apartment, creeping past wires, bottles, fuses and volatile shells. One day after a mass shooting claimed 12 lives, bomb technicians used the remote-control device to disarm and preserve dangerous evidence that might help explain - and convict - the enigma at the center of an explosion of violence. The portrait that continued to emerge of shooting suspect James E. Holmes on Saturday, that of a highly intelligent, troubled young man who had just quit a prestigious doctorate program, did little to answer the essential question: What could possibly motivate someone with such promise - or anyone - to shoot dozens of strangers and leave behind an apartment that was apparently programmed to kill.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
AURORA, Colo. - Kaitlyn Fonzi, 20, had her hand on the doorknob of her upstairs neighbor's booby-trapped apartment here early last Friday, ready to complain about his blaring music. She had no idea how close she was to becoming one of the casualties in a massacre that left 12 dead and 58 injured. On Wednesday, Fonzi returned to the three-story brick apartment building with her boyfriend, Chris Rodriguez, 30, to see when they could come back. Many others in town were wondering the same thing - not only about the apartment building, but about the Century 16 theater, where police say James E. Holmes attacked moviegoers during the post-midnight premiere of the latest Batman installment,"The Dark Knight Rises.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, This post has been updated. See the notes below for details
AURORA, Colo. -- Bomb experts and law enforcement authorities successfully completed the first phase of their delicate, dangerous work Saturday morning dismantling the booby-trapped apartment of James E. Holmes, the suspect in the Colorado movie theater shooting. [Updated at 10:52 a.m. PDT, July 21: At 11:40 a.m. MDT a controlled explosion was detonated inside the apartment after several blocks of nearby Peoria Street had been evacuated. A large concussion followed a cry of "fire in the hole!"
NATIONAL
July 21, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Matt Stevens and Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
AURORA, Colo. - The robot snaked methodically through the apartment, creeping past wires, bottles, fuses and volatile shells. One day after a mass shooting claimed 12 lives, bomb technicians used the remote-control device to disarm and preserve dangerous evidence that might help explain - and convict - the enigma at the center of an explosion of violence. The portrait that continued to emerge of shooting suspect James E. Holmes on Saturday, that of a highly intelligent, troubled young man who had just quit a prestigious doctorate program, did little to answer the essential question: What could possibly motivate someone with such promise - or anyone - to shoot dozens of strangers and leave behind an apartment that was apparently programmed to kill.
NATIONAL
July 20, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The suspect in the shooting rampage at a Colorado movie theater has been identified as James Holmes, described by law enforcement sources as a loner. Holmes, 24, was taken into custody in the parking lot outside the Century 16 movie theater after the post-midnight attack in Aurora, Colo., on Friday. He allegedly entered the theater through an exit door about half an hour into the local premier of the Batman movie “The Dark Knight Rises.” At least 12 were killed in the attack.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The trip wires rigged to potentially deadly booby traps in a popular Utah recreation area were so slender they were practically invisible to the average eye. But James Schoeffler's eyes are not average. During his tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, it was Schoeffler's job to find such trip wires and dismantle the explosive devices to which they were attached. He never expected to find himself doing the same job in a forest in Utah. Authorities are lauding Schoeffler as a hero after he spotted trip wires to a pair of deadly traps just off Big Springs Trail in Provo Canyon.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS -- Just when you thought it was safe to go back on those mountain trails. In a case that has stunned authorities with its ruthlessness, two Utah men have been arrested in connection with a pair of deadly makeshift booby traps set up along a popular hiking trail. One of the traps involved a trip wire triggered to send a 20-pound, spiked boulder swinging into an unsuspecting victim. The other was designed to trip a passer-by into a bed of sharpened wooden stakes. The two suspects, ages 19 and 21, told investigators after being arrested last weekend on suspicion of misdemeanor reckless endangerment that the traps were intended for wildlife.
NEWS
December 19, 1999 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What was he supposed to do? It's not a question so much as a challenge. A challenge to anyone who thinks Lenny Miller was wrong to booby-trap his cabin with a shotgun. Three times in eight months, the cabin had been burglarized. His hunting rifles had been stolen. His fishing gear too. And his tackle box. His new chain saw and his leaf blower and his Christmas present, a fillet knife still in its box. His boat had been vandalized. His outhouse trashed.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | CHRIS CHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four police investigators fled for their lives after coming across a booby-trapped methamphetamine lab at the Newbury Park home of Bradley Raville earlier this month, a sheriff's detective testified Monday. Moving cautiously inside a backyard shed, investigators came upon the trap while opening a door whose handle had been tied to a can of highly flammable chemicals, Ventura County Sheriff's Det. Richard Barrios testified during a pretrial hearing for Raville.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2010 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Hemet police announced the arrest Saturday of two men in connection with seven violent attacks against local authorities in this small Riverside County city. Nicholas John Smit, 40, of Hemet, was booked on suspicion of attempting to murder a police officer and of building a potentially deadly booby trap. Smit already faces charges for cultivating marijuana, the result of an earlier arrest made by Hemet police, said Chief Richard Dana. Authorities disclosed few details about what led to the arrests, saying only that physical evidence gathered from the attacks led investigators to the suspects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2010 | By David Kelly
Roadblocks have gone up behind the Hemet Police Department. Sidewalks outside have closed, blast-proof glass is going in, and $155,000 in barricades and fences are being installed. Linger out front too long and expect a visit from an officer monitoring surveillance cameras. Such is the new reality for police here, where life has increasingly taken on the feel of a war zone. Over the last few months, police have been stalked and attacked by what investigators believe is a gang eager to avenge the department's aggressive efforts to crack down on it. "We have a gang that is focused on doing violence to the Police Department, and it has to end here or it will spread to Nebraska, Kansas and beyond," said Police Chief Richard Dana during an interview in his office Thursday.
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