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WORLD
September 14, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
HONG KONG - As the final call for the flight to Beijing crackles over the public address system, Zhang Qian flips through the pages of a book on display across from the boarding gate at the Hong Kong airport. When somebody looks over his shoulder, Zhang closes the book sheepishly as though he was caught peeking at pornography. Actually, it's a biography of Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, one of dozens of titles on Chinese politics available in Hong Kong. "Just looking," said Zhang, a businessman from the Chinese city of Qingdao, as he reluctantly put the book back on the shelf.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
The "Today" show started a monthly book club Tuesday morning with an Oxford-and-clairvoyance debut, "The Bone Season," by 21 year-old author Samantha Shannon. With "The Bone Season" the first in a projected seven-part dystopian series, it seems impossible to talk about the book without calling the British author and young Oxford graduate "the next J.K. Rowling. " Buzz for the Bloomsbury series has been circulating since last October when the film rights were sold to Andy Serkis (Gollum himself)
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NATIONAL
June 19, 2004 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Bill Clinton was on a roll, telling a rapt audience at New York University this week about his battles against impeachment and life in the White House. But then he abruptly stopped, and left listeners with a big tease: "If you like what I talked about," he said, "wait until you read the book." With Clinton's memoir, "My Life," set to hit stores next week, the stories behind its publication are bursting with superlatives: The former president got a $10-million advance from publisher Alfred A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Deborah Raffin, a film actress, veteran of television miniseries and entrepreneur whose company, Dove Books-on-Tape, became a major force in the audio book industry, died Wednesday of leukemia at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. She was 59. She was diagnosed with the blood cancer about a year ago, said her brother, William. The blond, California-born actress first came to attention in the mid-1970s playing "pretty girl" roles in movies such as "Forty Carats" with Liv Ullman and "Once Is Not Enough," based on the salacious novel by Jacqueline Susann.
NEWS
May 31, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
There were no performing elephants, no brass bands and only a handful of jugglers or French clowns. Videos flashed from a minimum of display areas, and costumed theme characters paraded in smaller-than-ever numbers. Gourmet recipe books were more likely to be announced with posters than with pots of savory samples, and the decided dearth of freebies left gimme-grabbers toting more paper than products. Celebrities were scarce, but authors abounded.
MAGAZINE
January 25, 1998
With the book industry in dire straits, one might wonder how to get published these days. Answer: become Jenny McCarthy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Deborah Raffin, a film actress, veteran of television miniseries and entrepreneur whose company, Dove Books-on-Tape, became a major force in the audio book industry, died Wednesday of leukemia at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. She was 59. She was diagnosed with the blood cancer about a year ago, said her brother, William. The blond, California-born actress first came to attention in the mid-1970s playing "pretty girl" roles in movies such as "Forty Carats" with Liv Ullman and "Once Is Not Enough," based on the salacious novel by Jacqueline Susann.
BOOKS
September 15, 1985
I have yet to speak with an author or other person associated with the book industry who is not disappointed at the demise of "Endpapers." BOB HOLT Director, Book Publicists of San Diego
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Bob Cooper with Landscape Entertainment finalizes negotiations to option Libby Sternberg's "Fire Me," a yet-to-be-published comic novel about a woman's daylong campaign to get fired. Sternberg is represented by Caitlin Blasdell with Liza Dawson Associates and Bruce L.
NEWS
May 22, 2003 | Renee Tawa
It's hard not to notice the rise of conservative writers, such as right-wing pundit Ann Coulter ("Slander") and Fox cable news host Bill O'Reilly ("The No Spin Zone"), on bestseller lists these days -- a trend that is increasingly being recognized in the book industry. Bookspan, which runs the Book-of-the-Month Club, announced this week that it will introduce a yet-unnamed club later this year aimed at conservatives.
WORLD
September 14, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
HONG KONG - As the final call for the flight to Beijing crackles over the public address system, Zhang Qian flips through the pages of a book on display across from the boarding gate at the Hong Kong airport. When somebody looks over his shoulder, Zhang closes the book sheepishly as though he was caught peeking at pornography. Actually, it's a biography of Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, one of dozens of titles on Chinese politics available in Hong Kong. "Just looking," said Zhang, a businessman from the Chinese city of Qingdao, as he reluctantly put the book back on the shelf.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2012 | By David Sarno
The nation's independent bookstores got another bit of bad news Thursday: Google Inc.is closing the books on them. The Mountain View, Calif., search company said it is ending a program that enabled hundreds of independent booksellers to sell many of Google's millions of electronic books through their websites -- and to make a profit doing it. The program was in part an attempt by Google to build a network of e-book retailers that...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
About a month ago, I had a couple of conversations about publishing and bookselling that seemed to fly in the face of convention - if, by convention, you mean the idea that publishing and bookselling are doomed. The first was with Steve Crist, publisher of the Santa Barbara-based press Ammo Books, which recently released "Edward Weston: One Hundred Twenty-Five Photographs," a retrospective with text from Weston's notebooks. The second was with Maryelizabeth Hart, co-owner of San Diego's Mysterious Galaxy Bookstore, which opened a satellite branch in Redondo Beach this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2011 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
Joe Simon, a comic book industry pioneer whose defining career moment came in the dark days of March 1941 when he delivered a star-spangled superhero named Captain America, has died. He was 98. Simon died Wednesday night in New York City after a brief illness, according to a statement from his family, and his death adds a solemn final note to the 70th anniversary of his greatest creation, Captain America, who leaped across the big screen this summer with the Marvel Studios film "Captain America: The First Avenger.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2010 | Mcclatchy-Tribune News Service
Since Amazon.com debuted its first Kindle e-book reader late in 2007, the reaction within the book industry has been a mix of welcome and scorn. Welcome because of the potential to tap an entirely new market -- before a wave of digital piracy similar to the one that decimated the music business. Scorn because of fears that the online retail giant, which already has a commanding share of the market for printed books, might use its leverage to seize control of the new market and push down prices even further.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2009 | Scott Martelle
This is how a writer knows his books have grabbed the full attention of mainstream American culture. By the time Dan Brown's "The Lost Symbol," his first novel since 2003's "The Da Vinci Code," lands on bookstore shelves Tuesday, pre-orders will have kept it at or near the top of Amazon's bestseller list for the last 148 days. On Sunday, Parade magazine published a selection from "The Lost Symbol," the first time it has excerpted a novel in its 68-year history. Beginning last Tuesday, in a marketing merger between publisher Doubleday and NBC, "Today" show co-host Matt Lauer unveiled a clue a day about the closely guarded plot.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2012 | By David Sarno
The nation's independent bookstores got another bit of bad news Thursday: Google Inc.is closing the books on them. The Mountain View, Calif., search company said it is ending a program that enabled hundreds of independent booksellers to sell many of Google's millions of electronic books through their websites -- and to make a profit doing it. The program was in part an attempt by Google to build a network of e-book retailers that...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1998 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just three months after Crown Books shut down nearly all of its San Fernando Valley locations, Barnes & Noble, the nation's largest bookseller, is preparing to open a 25,000-square-foot store in the new Commons at Calabasas shopping center. The store, which offers sweeping views of the Valley, will be the first Barnes & Noble outlet to open this year in Los Angeles County.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2008 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- HarperCollins continued to reshuffle its management Thursday, following the resignation of President and Chief Executive Jane Friedman. Brian Murray, a company veteran tapped to succeed Friedman, will have two top deputies: Michael Morrison, who will run HarperCollins' U.S. book business, and Victoria Barnsley, who will direct international operations. Murray, 41, had been the company's president of worldwide operations and had been Friedman's top deputy since 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The nation's weary and worried book critics, who have endured cutbacks in newspapers around the country, are getting a pat on the back from the industry they cover. The Assn. of American Publishers announced Wednesday that it will give its annual AAP Honors prize, for "significant achievements in promoting American books and authors," to the National Book Critics Circle.
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