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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2010 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Studded with vivid character sketches and evocative descriptions of the American landscape, journalist Judy Pasternak's scarifying account of uranium mining's disastrous consequences often reads like a novel — though you will wish that the bad guys got punished as effectively as they do in commercial fiction. Real life is complicated, and Pasternak, a veteran of 24 years with the Los Angeles Times, does justice to the historical and ethical ambiguities of her tale while crafting a narrative of exemplary clarity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2011 | By Jonathan Kirsch, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Panorama A Novel H.G. Adler, translated from the German by Peter Filkins Random House: 454 pp., $26 Life is short and art is long, as the saying goes, but the sad fact is that a work of literature may not outlive its human author. Such was the apparent fate of the work of H.G. Adler. He was forced to wait decades before several of his novels saw print, and two of them remain unpublished long after his death in 1988. But, remarkably, Adler has been rediscovered by American publishers and readers, and his 1948 novel "Panorama" is now available in an English translation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2011 | By Paula L. Woods, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Three Seconds A Novel Anders Roslund and Börge Hellström Translated from the Swedish by Kari Dickson Silver Oak: 489 pp., $24.95 Appetites whetted by the astronomical success of Stieg Larsson's "Girl Who" series, publishers and readers alike are on the hunt for the Next Big Swedish Crime Novel. What gets glossed over in that quest is the fact that four Swedish writers ? Henning Mankell, Hakan Nesser, Ake Edwardson and Inger Frimansson? have toiled in the field for decades and produced among them nine powerful, award-winning books.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2011 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
It's the way that we talk that fascinates Ralph Keyes. The words we choose to express the hurtful, the bawdy and what we perceive as shameful are of particular interest ? because those are the subjects society feels the need to cover up. We switch from "sex" to "sleeping together;" from "dead" to "pushing up daisies;" even "chicken breast" became "white meat" after Winston Churchill was once scolded for using it at a dinner party. The follow-up to Keyes' first effort on linguistics ?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011 | By Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Absolute Monarchs A History of the Papacy John Julius Norwich Random House: 513 pp., $30 When preeminent British historian John Julius Norwich tells us in the introduction to his sweeping history of the Catholic papacy that his job is to give us "a straightforward single-volume history" of the world's "most astonishing social, political, and spiritual institution ever created," he's hit the nail on the proverbial head. The centuries-old Roman papacy truly is a universally unrivaled institution, and in dense detail, Norwich's book shows us the historic playbook.
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