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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2011 | By Gordon Marino, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We're living in an age of prize proliferation. It might not feel like it — especially with so many families hit hard by economic turmoil in the last few years — but it still exists, according to Joel Best's "Everyone's a Winner," a book that looks at the ways and the reasons why our society puts so much emphasis on a pat on the back. Everyone knows that the gentleman's C of years ago has become the B-plus or A-minus of today. Averages higher than 4.0 are commonplace in high schools and, at graduation time, many schools crown not one but multiple valedictorians.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2010 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
Long before vampires were posing naked on the cover of a recent issue of Rolling Stone , they were vile, terrifying creatures that looked like rats, lived in crypts and hardly ever turned up at the gym. Fortunately for fans of the old-school literary villains, writing partners Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan are determined to resurrect that archetype with a series of novels centered on the exploits of the Master, an imposing, murine-like figure...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2011 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's ironic that a book that looks to pull back the curtain on decades of conspiracy theories about UFOs and Nevada's infamous Area 51 may, in the end, become best remembered for launching yet another conspiracy theory. The book is "Area 51: An Uncensored History of America's Top Secret Military Base" by journalist Annie Jacobsen (a book that began as a two-part series in the Los Angeles Times Magazine in spring 2009). Jacobsen does as advertised. She had unprecedented access to former workers at the site, who filled her notebooks with details about secret doings (some now unclassified)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Film producer Simon Lewis was driving down Beverly Boulevard with his wife in 1994 when their car was broadsided by a van traveling at about 75 mph. Lewis, then 35, had seen his biggest success with "Look Who's Talking," a comedy about a chatty baby starring John Travolta, Kirstie Alley and the voice of Bruce Willis. But after this accident his life would never be the same. An hour after emergency workers reached the scene of the accident - the car had spun through the air and smashed into a tree - they found the bloodied Lewis and were surprised to discover he had a pulse.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Good Neighbors A Novel Ryan David Jahn Penguin: 280 pp., $15 paper How fair is it to hold a novel to actual events? It's a question I kept asking as I read Ryan David Jahn's first book, "Good Neighbors" (published in England as "Acts of Violence" in 2009), based on the notorious murder of Kitty Genovese, the Queens, N.Y., bar manager stabbed to death early on the morning of March 13, 1964, outside her Kew Gardens building. Although the attack continued, with a break, for 30 minutes, only one of the people who witnessed it from their apartments — 38 of them, according to an iconic New York Times story that ran two weeks after the killing — did anything to help.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011 | By Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Absolute Monarchs A History of the Papacy John Julius Norwich Random House: 513 pp., $30 When preeminent British historian John Julius Norwich tells us in the introduction to his sweeping history of the Catholic papacy that his job is to give us "a straightforward single-volume history" of the world's "most astonishing social, political, and spiritual institution ever created," he's hit the nail on the proverbial head. The centuries-old Roman papacy truly is a universally unrivaled institution, and in dense detail, Norwich's book shows us the historic playbook.
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