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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1994 | From the Associated Press
A federal appeals court Wednesday agreed to consider whether to overturn the death penalty for "Freeway Killer" William Bonin, who was convicted of killing 14 boys and young men. If he loses the appeal and final reviews by the U.S. Supreme Court, Bonin could be the next person executed in California. Several other federal appeals have failed for Bonin, who is on Death Row in San Quentin. On Wednesday, the U.S.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 2002 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nine Pennsylvania coal miners rescued Saturday after three days underground have sold the TV-movie and book rights to their story to divisions of Walt Disney Co. for $150,000 apiece, according to the Pittsburgh attorney representing the men. Thomas Crawford, who specializes in criminal tax and labor law, said the deal includes a movie for Disney's ABC network and a book that will be published by the Burbank company's book arm, Hyperion Publishing. An ABC spokesman declined to comment Friday.
NEWS
August 24, 1986 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, Times Staff Writer
Like most Southern Californians on Aug. 24, 1985, the family was riveted to evening news reports that the Night Stalker serial killer, just blamed for a new murder and assault in San Francisco, was believed headed back to the Southland. "It'd be incredible if he came here to Mission Viejo," Grace Yoo, then 18, remarked nervously to the rest of the family.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2008 | Brad Wilcox, Wilcox is a freelance writer.
When bestselling author Robert Jordan died last year from a rare blood disease, fans of his popular series, "The Wheel of Time," braced themselves for the possibility that his 12-book fantasy world would end one volume shy of completion. Before his death, Jordan, whose real name was James Rigney Jr., signed over the book rights to his wife, Harriet, and requested that she find a capable author to finish the series for his fans.
NEWS
February 8, 1998
The notion that the erratic mating behavior of humans parallels the predictable mating behavior of the animal kingdom is hardly new. What's new in first-time novelist Laura Zigman's funny new book, "Animal Husbandry" (The Dial Press), is a) a clever and comic theory and b) timing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Harold H. Wilke, an armless United Church of Christ minister whose early advocacy for people with disabilities helped set the stage for a movement that ultimately won basic protections for them in areas ranging from employment to transportation, has died. He was 88. A resident of Claremont, Wilke died of heart failure Tuesday at Pomona Valley Hospital after a period of declining health.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
It has taken businessman John Aglialoro nearly 20 years to realize his ambition of making a movie out of "Atlas Shrugged," the 1957 novel by Ayn Rand that has sold more than 7 million copies and has as passionate a following among many political conservatives and libertarians as "Twilight" has among teen girls. But the version of the book coming to theaters Friday is decidedly independent, low-cost and even makeshift. Shot for a modest $10 million by a first-time director with a cast of little-known actors, "Atlas Shrugged: Part I," the first in an expected trilogy, will play on about 300 screens in 80 markets.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Random House Inc. has asked a federal judge to bar a publisher of electronic books from copying works of William Styron, Kurt Vonnegut, and Robert Parker and selling them over the Internet. Random House, a unit of Bertelsmann AG, the world's third largest media company, says rival RosettaBooks LLC has cherry-picked eight important titles, including "Sophie's Choice" and "Slaughterhouse-Five," copied them in digital format, and begun selling them online.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
A jury of 12 people was seated Friday for the murder trial of sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad. Opening statements in the trial of the 42-year-old Army veteran are expected to begin Monday. The jury, with three alternates, includes some members with ties to the military -- an expected mix in a community with large Navy installations. The 10 women and five men, 13 whites and two blacks were culled from a pool of 123.
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