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Book Value

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BUSINESS
August 26, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
With stocks at record heights, bulls and bears alike are straining mightily to defend their respective positions. If you want to start a fist-fight between the two camps, mention "book value." A company's book value is its theoretical liquidation value--that is, the sum that would be left for shareholders if all the assets were sold and all the bills paid off. It's essentially the net worth of the company.
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BUSINESS
January 2, 2014 | By Shan Li
Warren Buffett, the billionaire investor known as the Oracle of Omaha, may miss his investing goal for the first time in more than four decades. The chairman and chief executive of investment firm Berkshire Hathaway might soon disclose his Omaha company failed over the last five years to boost its net worth more quickly than the Standard & Poor's 500 Index, Bloomberg reported. That five-year comparison has been used by Buffett to demonstrate his company's performance over time. PHOTOS: Richest and poorest cities in America When considered on an annual basis, the company has already failed nine times to show a percentage increase in book value that was greater than the S&P percentage gain.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 1985
The ailing Santa Monica computer maker said its common stock will continue to be traded on the National Assn. of Securities Dealers' NASDAQ system even though the company's book value fell below the $1-million level set by the over-the-counter trading organization. The securities organization is letting the company stay on its market list at least through March, when Compucorp's first-quarter results could bring the firm's book value back to the required minimum.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
For the first time in more than three years, Century City aircraft leasing giant International Lease Finance Corp. is placing an order for passenger jets. The company, better known as ILFC, said it plans to purchase 100 Airbus A320 jets and 33 of Boeing Co.'s 737s. The planes have a book value of more than $11 billion. ILFC currently owns a fleet of about 930 aircraft but hasn't placed an order for new aircraft since October 2007. The company was restricted in its ability to pick up new planes after the 2008 global financial crisis nearly brought down its parent company, American International Group Inc. But last year, ILFC raised $14 billion from investors and aircraft sales.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2014 | By Shan Li
Warren Buffett, the billionaire investor known as the Oracle of Omaha, may miss his investing goal for the first time in more than four decades. The chairman and chief executive of investment firm Berkshire Hathaway might soon disclose his Omaha company failed over the last five years to boost its net worth more quickly than the Standard & Poor's 500 Index, Bloomberg reported. That five-year comparison has been used by Buffett to demonstrate his company's performance over time. PHOTOS: Richest and poorest cities in America When considered on an annual basis, the company has already failed nine times to show a percentage increase in book value that was greater than the S&P percentage gain.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2004 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Remember when PDA simply stood for public display of affection? In today's rapid-fire, time-deprived world, the acronym more frequently refers to the personal digital assistant -- those little hand-held electronic information devices that hold people's entire lives and have become nearly as ubiquitous as cellphones.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2001 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Southern California Edison dug in its heels Thursday over a proposed cut-rate sale of its transmission grid to the state, but otherwise offered grudging support for a rescue package being drafted in the state Assembly. The bill, whose details keep changing, would allow the Rosemead utility to pay the bulk of its power debt by selling as much as $2.9 billion in bonds to investors. The bonds would be repaid by some Edison business customers and would leave about $1 million in unpaid obligations.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1990 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the stocks of many local companies floundering, now may be the time to go bottom fishing. That, at least, is the opinion of Newport Securities. The Costa Mesa brokerage has compiled a list of 15 Orange County firms whose shares are selling below the company's book value because of "exaggerated pessimism" in the stock market.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Millionaire businessman John E. Anderson offered Tuesday to buy 1st Business Bank of Los Angeles for about $89 million in cash in a transaction that would turn the publicly held bank into a private concern. Anderson, a former director of the bank, offered $27 a share in cash for all outstanding stock. The stock is priced at about $21.50 on the over-the-counter market. The purchase price would be three times the book value of the bank--essentially assets minus liabilities.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The federal government is likely to lose as much as 40 cents on the dollar in selling its current crop of savings-and-loan assets, an investigation by The Times shows. The losses are expected to be far greater than they have been during the last two years, and are likely to add tens of billions to the current $160-billion estimated price tag for the government bailout of the ailing thrift industry. A massive computer review of the records of the Resolution Trust Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2004 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Remember when PDA simply stood for public display of affection? In today's rapid-fire, time-deprived world, the acronym more frequently refers to the personal digital assistant -- those little hand-held electronic information devices that hold people's entire lives and have become nearly as ubiquitous as cellphones.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2001 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Southern California Edison dug in its heels Thursday over a proposed cut-rate sale of its transmission grid to the state, but otherwise offered grudging support for a rescue package being drafted in the state Assembly. The bill, whose details keep changing, would allow the Rosemead utility to pay the bulk of its power debt by selling as much as $2.9 billion in bonds to investors. The bonds would be repaid by some Edison business customers and would leave about $1 million in unpaid obligations.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
With stocks at record heights, bulls and bears alike are straining mightily to defend their respective positions. If you want to start a fist-fight between the two camps, mention "book value." A company's book value is its theoretical liquidation value--that is, the sum that would be left for shareholders if all the assets were sold and all the bills paid off. It's essentially the net worth of the company.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The federal government is likely to lose as much as 40 cents on the dollar in selling its current crop of savings-and-loan assets, an investigation by The Times shows. The losses are expected to be far greater than they have been during the last two years, and are likely to add tens of billions to the current $160-billion estimated price tag for the government bailout of the ailing thrift industry. A massive computer review of the records of the Resolution Trust Corp.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1990 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the stocks of many local companies floundering, now may be the time to go bottom fishing. That, at least, is the opinion of Newport Securities. The Costa Mesa brokerage has compiled a list of 15 Orange County firms whose shares are selling below the company's book value because of "exaggerated pessimism" in the stock market.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Millionaire businessman John E. Anderson offered Tuesday to buy 1st Business Bank of Los Angeles for about $89 million in cash in a transaction that would turn the publicly held bank into a private concern. Anderson, a former director of the bank, offered $27 a share in cash for all outstanding stock. The stock is priced at about $21.50 on the over-the-counter market. The purchase price would be three times the book value of the bank--essentially assets minus liabilities.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
For the first time in more than three years, Century City aircraft leasing giant International Lease Finance Corp. is placing an order for passenger jets. The company, better known as ILFC, said it plans to purchase 100 Airbus A320 jets and 33 of Boeing Co.'s 737s. The planes have a book value of more than $11 billion. ILFC currently owns a fleet of about 930 aircraft but hasn't placed an order for new aircraft since October 2007. The company was restricted in its ability to pick up new planes after the 2008 global financial crisis nearly brought down its parent company, American International Group Inc. But last year, ILFC raised $14 billion from investors and aircraft sales.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Other than hearing that your policy has been canceled, it's about the worst news you can get from your auto insurer: Sorry, your vehicle has been "totaled." But if you loved that car or truck, totaled doesn't always have to be the death sentence that the term implies. A totaled vehicle isn't always a mangled mess. Sometimes it's salvageable. And even if it can't be saved--or you chose not to try--the settlement your insurer offers isn't necessarily the best you can do.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1985
The ailing Santa Monica computer maker said its common stock will continue to be traded on the National Assn. of Securities Dealers' NASDAQ system even though the company's book value fell below the $1-million level set by the over-the-counter trading organization. The securities organization is letting the company stay on its market list at least through March, when Compucorp's first-quarter results could bring the firm's book value back to the required minimum.
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