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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2010 | By Jonathan Shapiro, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Chuck Palahniuk is as subtle as a straight right to the jaw, and just as bracing. His 1996 novel "Fight Club" was a terrific meditation on the decrepit state of modern manhood. It had a relentless pace, brutal honesty and pitch-black humor. Made into a terrifically disturbing film starring Edward Norton and Brad Pitt, the book showed Palahniuk's gift for speaking uncomfortable truths about taboo subjects, such as how the American male tends to treat his existential ennui with meaningless consumerism, tawdry sex and wanton violence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
This fall, there will be nothing bigger in bookstores than Hurricane Dan. On Sept. 15, Dan Brown's "The Lost Symbol," the follow-up to "The Da Vinci Code" -- which sold 80 million copies worldwide and is said to be the biggest-selling novel ever -- arrives with high expectations; fans have spent six years waiting for Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon's next adventure. As a consequence, perhaps, some publishers have gotten quieter literary fiction on the shelves in advance. Los Angeles novelist Michelle Huneven's "Blame" is about the lifetime of consequences that result from an alcoholic's mistake.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Among the many observations both endearing and illuminating in Linda Ronstadt's new memoir, “Simple Dreams” (Simon & Schuster, $25), which arrives Tuesday, Sept. 17, is the moment she recalls discovering her calling in life. “I can remember sitting at the piano,” she writes in the first chapter of the 242-page book. “My sister was playing and my brother was singing something, and I said, 'I want to try that.' My sister turned to my brother and said, 'Think we got a soprano here.' … I remember thinking, 'I'm a singer, that's what I do.' It was like I had become validated somehow, my existence affirmed.” She was 4. That moment of clarity didn't have anything to do with the worldwide fame Ronstadt would achieve as one of the most powerfully emotive singers of her generation, or the 10 Grammy Awards she eventually would win for a remarkably varied career spanning country and rock, classic pop and traditional Mexican folk music, opera and Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2010
Palin plans next book Sarah Palin is ready for the next chapter of her publishing career. Publisher HarperCollins announced Wednesday that the former Alaska governor and Republican vice presidential candidate is working on a "celebration of American virtues and strengths." The book is currently untitled, and no release date has been set. Palin's memoir, "Going Rogue," released last fall by HarperCollins, has sold more than 2 million copies. -- associated press Bon Jovi to echo Obama's call The audience at Bon Jovi's L.A. tour stop Thursday night at Staples Center will get the first look at a new video in which the New Jersey rock band's frontman, Jon Bon Jovi, goes to bat for President Obama's call for increased community volunteerism.
IMAGE
December 1, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Several new style books focus on great American jewelry design. Here we zero in on two of the stand-out volumes of the season. David Webb: The Quintessential American Jeweler Ruth Peltason Assouline, $85 American jewelry designer David Webb was a fixture on New York's social scene during the 1960s and '70s, beloved by Diana Vreeland, Nan Kempner, Doris Duke, Elizabeth Taylor, Barbra Streisand and many other style-setters. Webb is perhaps best known for his animal bracelets, more fierce than cute, featuring lions, tigers and dragons, which were part of the ladies-who-lunch uniform of the day. But his legacy encompasses so much more, writes Ruth Peltason in "David Webb: The Quintessential American Jeweler.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Sonny Barger is not a religious man. But riding motorcycles is "as good a religion as any and probably better than most," says the Hells Angels icon. Meditative and transcendent, motorcycling focuses the mind, he says, and requires devotion. At 71, Barger has spent six decades riding bikes and 53 years as a member of the country's best-known outlaw motorcycle club. Now he's spreading the gospel of two wheels with his sixth book, "Let's Ride: Sonny Barger's Guide to Motorcycling, How to Ride the Right Way — for Life," co-written with Darwin Holmstrom.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2009 | Associated Press
A series of four books presented Tuesday at the Vatican seeks to explain how Michelangelo and other artists translated the Bible into images to produce in the Sistine Chapel some of the world's most renowned frescoes. The first volume focuses on Michelangelo's ceiling and its scenes from the book of Genesis and the creation of the world. Vatican Museums director Antonio Paolucci said the volume offers a "basic code" to understand the symbols and scenes that adorn the room where popes are elected.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
The day after Barack Obama won a second term, Jacket Copy mused on the possibility of postelection books , predicting that Julian Castro, the telegenic Texas politico with the Texas-sized grin, would soon write a memoir detailing the up-from-the-bootstraps story of his San Antonio family. Now, just eight days after the election, Castro, the mayor of San Antonio, has in fact inked a book deal -- with Little, Brown. The book will, according to the publisher, include the story of Castro's mother, Maria, a founder of La Raza Unida Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2010 | By Steve Almond, Special to the Los Angeles Times
What He's Poised to Do Stories Ben Greenman Harper Perennial: 172 pp., $13.99 paper I read a lot of short fiction — it's one of my healthier addictions — so I hope you'll take this statement as more than a passing impression: It's been a long time since I've read a story collection as assured and persuasive as Ben Greenman's "What He's Poised to Do." Greenman long has displayed a dazzling command of the language and a boundless imagination. But his five previous books often favored cleverness over genuine feeling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2010 | By Michael Rothfeld
At Mount Pleasant High School on Thursday morning, students practiced guitar in a courtyard and boned up on math before class. Parents met with the principal, and teens filtered in the doors. Faculty played an April Fool's joke, announcing that the school year had been extended. But amid the routine, tension rippled across the campus, set near the edge of a quiet San Jose neighborhood, over a book by Steve Poizner, a candidate in the Republican gubernatorial primary. Poizner, who spent a year teaching at the school, donated thousands of dollars to help its students and recorded his experiences in the book, has been told he is no longer welcome there.
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