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SPORTS
September 25, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
A good book will leave you laughing or crying. I just read one that left me wanting to take a shower. It is titled "Play Their Hearts Out. " It is about youth basketball and the general slime that surrounds it. If you think Johnny and Joey get those college scholarships by shooting hoops over the garage door and being molded to greatness by venerable Coach Tom at Neighborhood High, think again. First, some disclaimers. The book is written by George Dohrmann, who worked for me on the sports staff of The Times from 1995 to 1997.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Among the many observations both endearing and illuminating in Linda Ronstadt's new memoir, “Simple Dreams” (Simon & Schuster, $25), which arrives Tuesday, Sept. 17, is the moment she recalls discovering her calling in life. “I can remember sitting at the piano,” she writes in the first chapter of the 242-page book. “My sister was playing and my brother was singing something, and I said, 'I want to try that.' My sister turned to my brother and said, 'Think we got a soprano here.' … I remember thinking, 'I'm a singer, that's what I do.' It was like I had become validated somehow, my existence affirmed.” She was 4. That moment of clarity didn't have anything to do with the worldwide fame Ronstadt would achieve as one of the most powerfully emotive singers of her generation, or the 10 Grammy Awards she eventually would win for a remarkably varied career spanning country and rock, classic pop and traditional Mexican folk music, opera and Broadway.
TRAVEL
September 2, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Question: On Aug. 1, I tried to book a round-trip flight on American Airlines between San Diego and Philadelphia for Oct. 1 using my frequent-flier miles. I thought a two-month lead would facilitate the reservation. There were no seats available for 25,000 miles for October. I paid $25 to speak to a human. She tried her best but with the same result. If I were willing to expend 50,000 miles, there were plenty of seats. How far ahead does AA release its frequent-flier seats? Is this bait and switch?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan and Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
The staff of the Pleasure Chest, a high-end West Hollywood sex shop, were first tipped to the "Fifty Shades of Grey" phenomenon by their accountant, who noticed a curious spike in sales a few weeks ago. New customers had been drawn to the store after reading the erotic novel about a young woman's submissive sexual relationship with a wealthy businessman, and wanted some products described in the book. Now the Pleasure Chest is organizing "Fifty Shades of Pleasure" workshops at its West Hollywood, Chicago and New York locations.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The film version of Cheryl Strayed's memoir "Wild" is picking up steam: Reese Witherspoon has signed on to portray the author. In the book, Strayed writes of hiking the 1,000-mile Pacific Crest trail alone, compelled by grief over her mother's death, a failed relationship and a need to seek out answers. Oprah Winfrey found it so compelling that she revived her shuttered book club for it. "Wild" was a 2012 bestseller. The film has a strong literary pedigree -- in addition to the original book, the screenplay was written by Nick Hornby, author of "High Fidelity" and "About a Boy. " As a novelist, Hornby has had a number of bestsellers, and he received an Oscar nomination for his screenplay of "An Education.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
This fall, there will be nothing bigger in bookstores than Hurricane Dan. On Sept. 15, Dan Brown's "The Lost Symbol," the follow-up to "The Da Vinci Code" -- which sold 80 million copies worldwide and is said to be the biggest-selling novel ever -- arrives with high expectations; fans have spent six years waiting for Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon's next adventure. As a consequence, perhaps, some publishers have gotten quieter literary fiction on the shelves in advance. Los Angeles novelist Michelle Huneven's "Blame" is about the lifetime of consequences that result from an alcoholic's mistake.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Kevin Trudeau, the television pitchman who has been both successful and suspect, was sentenced to 10 years in prison Monday for making false claims, Reuters reports . Trudeau was found found guilty of criminal contempt in November in Chicago. The claims in question were made in Trudeau's book "The Weight Loss Cure 'They' Don't Want You To Know About" and the television spots that promoted it. In sentencing Trudeau, Judge Ronald Guzman said, "He is deceitful to the very core, and that type of conduct simply cannot stand.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
If you're still looking for a "big" novel to carry into the summer holidays — one in which you can lose yourself without the guilty suspicion that you're slumming — then Julie Orringer's "The Invisible Bridge" is the book you want. It has been seven years since Orringer made her hardcover debut with an intelligent, stylistically assured collection of fiercely, if darkly, observed short stories titled "How to Breathe Underwater." In the time since, there has been a trickle of additional stories and occasional literary chat about a novel long in preparation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2010
Palin plans next book Sarah Palin is ready for the next chapter of her publishing career. Publisher HarperCollins announced Wednesday that the former Alaska governor and Republican vice presidential candidate is working on a "celebration of American virtues and strengths." The book is currently untitled, and no release date has been set. Palin's memoir, "Going Rogue," released last fall by HarperCollins, has sold more than 2 million copies. -- associated press Bon Jovi to echo Obama's call The audience at Bon Jovi's L.A. tour stop Thursday night at Staples Center will get the first look at a new video in which the New Jersey rock band's frontman, Jon Bon Jovi, goes to bat for President Obama's call for increased community volunteerism.
IMAGE
December 1, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Several new style books focus on great American jewelry design. Here we zero in on two of the stand-out volumes of the season. David Webb: The Quintessential American Jeweler Ruth Peltason Assouline, $85 American jewelry designer David Webb was a fixture on New York's social scene during the 1960s and '70s, beloved by Diana Vreeland, Nan Kempner, Doris Duke, Elizabeth Taylor, Barbra Streisand and many other style-setters. Webb is perhaps best known for his animal bracelets, more fierce than cute, featuring lions, tigers and dragons, which were part of the ladies-who-lunch uniform of the day. But his legacy encompasses so much more, writes Ruth Peltason in "David Webb: The Quintessential American Jeweler.
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