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HOME & GARDEN
December 19, 2009
When it comes to color, the subject of Kelly Wearstler's third coffee-table book, the Los Angeles-based designer writes: "I do not think there are any rules." That philosophy also applies to her literary efforts. Wearstler gained fame for creating high-voltage interiors filled with color, texture and pattern, but as an author, she plays the die-hard minimalist. "Hue" offers only an introductory Q & A with Wearstler that explores her philosophy of color and cites some of the architects, designers and artists who have inspired her. Photo captions don't exist, and credits and resources are found only in an index at the end of the book.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By August Brown
He's a rock god, television host , avant-garde pianist , feminine hygiene product endorser and record holder for longest drum performance . Now the one-man party maelstrom that is Andrew W.K. can add a new line to his C.V.: published author of an exquisite guide to his favorite activity. Which is partying, of course. Simon & Schuster picked up rights to "The Party Bible," W.K.'s new comprehensive book of motivational maxims and his metaphysics of partying. According to publisher Michael Szczerban, via the Onion A.V. Club , the book is “an unforgettable voyage in search of truth, wisdom, and party bliss ... every feeling will be permitted, every thought will become prophecy, and humanity's surging life force will be harnessed and ridden into the abyss.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Every summer, everyone and their uncle wants to tell you what to read at the beach. If they all had their way, you'd never have a chance to jump in the ocean, or to enjoy the sun, or to talk to your friends and family as you relax at the shore. No, you'd just be there with your nose in a book, and then another book, and then another book. So as the summer hits mid-stride, at Jacket Copy, we've got another idea: the anti-beach reading list. Here are nine books that you need not read at the beach, nay, that you SHOULD not read at the beach.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | by Carolyn kellogg
Presumed Republican candidate Mitt Romney's international tour was marked by missteps. One speech he gave at a fundraiser in Jerusalem was controversial for the figures he cited about the economic disparities between Israel and the Palestinians, and also for the conclusions he made about what that said about their cultures. And now, the author of one of the books he referenced in that speech is speaking out. Jared Diamond, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning book "Guns, Germs and Steel," says Romney "misrepresented my views.
SPORTS
September 25, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
A good book will leave you laughing or crying. I just read one that left me wanting to take a shower. It is titled "Play Their Hearts Out. " It is about youth basketball and the general slime that surrounds it. If you think Johnny and Joey get those college scholarships by shooting hoops over the garage door and being molded to greatness by venerable Coach Tom at Neighborhood High, think again. First, some disclaimers. The book is written by George Dohrmann, who worked for me on the sports staff of The Times from 1995 to 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Michelle Knight will write a book on the 11 years she spent as a captive in the Cleveland home of Ariel Castro. Weinstein books will publish the as yet untitled memoir in spring 2014. Knight was one of three women who were freed in a dramatic escape earlier this year. The other two, Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus, are writing a book about their experiences together with two award-winning journalists; a publisher for their book has not yet been announced. Knight was the first of the three women Castro abducted; she was held prisoner by him for 11 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Cary Elwes is writing a book about the making of the film "The Princess Bride. " Elwes, who played the dashing hero Westley, will publish the book in the fall of 2014 with Touchstone. Its title is bound to charm the film's fans: "As You Wish: Tales from the Princess Bride. " “It was a joy to work on such a magical film with an amazing cast of talented actors and friends,” Elwes said in a release about the book. “It will be great fun to revisit 'The Princess Bride' and to share my fond memories of the unforgettable experience we all had.” Elwes was inspired to write the book after joining the cast for a 25th anniversary screening last year in New York.
OPINION
May 23, 2010 | Craig Fehrman
In the spring of 1949, Eleanor Roosevelt turned in the manuscript for her second memoir — this one on the White House years — to her editors at Ladies' Home Journal. "You have written this too hastily," came the reply, "as though you were composing it on a bicycle while pedaling your way to a fire." Roosevelt's editors asked her to revise the manuscript with the help of a ghostwriter, but she refused. "I would have felt the book wasn't mine," she said. She ended up selling her book's serial rights to the Journal's biggest rival, McCall's, for $150,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
If you're still looking for a "big" novel to carry into the summer holidays — one in which you can lose yourself without the guilty suspicion that you're slumming — then Julie Orringer's "The Invisible Bridge" is the book you want. It has been seven years since Orringer made her hardcover debut with an intelligent, stylistically assured collection of fiercely, if darkly, observed short stories titled "How to Breathe Underwater." In the time since, there has been a trickle of additional stories and occasional literary chat about a novel long in preparation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Among the many observations both endearing and illuminating in Linda Ronstadt's new memoir, “Simple Dreams” (Simon & Schuster, $25), which arrives Tuesday, Sept. 17, is the moment she recalls discovering her calling in life. “I can remember sitting at the piano,” she writes in the first chapter of the 242-page book. “My sister was playing and my brother was singing something, and I said, 'I want to try that.' My sister turned to my brother and said, 'Think we got a soprano here.' … I remember thinking, 'I'm a singer, that's what I do.' It was like I had become validated somehow, my existence affirmed.” She was 4. That moment of clarity didn't have anything to do with the worldwide fame Ronstadt would achieve as one of the most powerfully emotive singers of her generation, or the 10 Grammy Awards she eventually would win for a remarkably varied career spanning country and rock, classic pop and traditional Mexican folk music, opera and Broadway.
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