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HOME & GARDEN
December 19, 2009
When it comes to color, the subject of Kelly Wearstler's third coffee-table book, the Los Angeles-based designer writes: "I do not think there are any rules." That philosophy also applies to her literary efforts. Wearstler gained fame for creating high-voltage interiors filled with color, texture and pattern, but as an author, she plays the die-hard minimalist. "Hue" offers only an introductory Q & A with Wearstler that explores her philosophy of color and cites some of the architects, designers and artists who have inspired her. Photo captions don't exist, and credits and resources are found only in an index at the end of the book.
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NEWS
August 2, 2012 | by Carolyn kellogg
Presumed Republican candidate Mitt Romney's international tour was marked by missteps. One speech he gave at a fundraiser in Jerusalem was controversial for the figures he cited about the economic disparities between Israel and the Palestinians, and also for the conclusions he made about what that said about their cultures. And now, the author of one of the books he referenced in that speech is speaking out. Jared Diamond, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning book "Guns, Germs and Steel," says Romney "misrepresented my views.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Son A Novel Lois Lowry Houghton Mifflin: 393 pp., $17.99, ages 12 and up It's been 19 years since the publication of Lois Lowry's pioneering Newbery Medal winner, "The Giver," which painted a bleak picture of a future society in which color does not exist, love is suppressed and sameness is revered. No one would have guessed that almost two decades later, "dystopian" would be its own genre in the young adult biblioscape, giving rise to blockbuster franchises such as "The Hunger Games," "Divergent," "Matched" and now, a follow-up from the author who's credited with starting it. "Son" is the Rashomon-style conclusion to "The Giver," told from the perspective of the young birth mother whose infant was saved in the original book.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
They were an unlikely couple, the Latin American immigrant and the West Virginia divorcee whose paths crossed in mid-1950s Los Angeles. But, by Margaret Runyan Castaneda's account, she and Carlos Castaneda were kindred spirits whose time together helped turn him into a countercultural phenomenon. Carlos wrote "The Teachings of Don Juan," a 1968 bestseller that told of his peyote-fueled adventures with Don Juan Matus, a Mexican shaman who purportedly guided him to an alternate realm inhabited by giant insects, witches and flying humans.
SPORTS
September 25, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
A good book will leave you laughing or crying. I just read one that left me wanting to take a shower. It is titled "Play Their Hearts Out. " It is about youth basketball and the general slime that surrounds it. If you think Johnny and Joey get those college scholarships by shooting hoops over the garage door and being molded to greatness by venerable Coach Tom at Neighborhood High, think again. First, some disclaimers. The book is written by George Dohrmann, who worked for me on the sports staff of The Times from 1995 to 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Michelle Knight will write a book on the 11 years she spent as a captive in the Cleveland home of Ariel Castro. Weinstein books will publish the as yet untitled memoir in spring 2014. Knight was one of three women who were freed in a dramatic escape earlier this year. The other two, Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus, are writing a book about their experiences together with two award-winning journalists; a publisher for their book has not yet been announced. Knight was the first of the three women Castro abducted; she was held prisoner by him for 11 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
Instant histories of presidential administrations based on privileged access to White House insiders have become so de rigueur that vetting the appropriate journalist/historian really ought to be part of every new chief executive's transition process. The author needs to be discreet enough to abide by the rules of high-level access and sympathetic enough to be open to the administration's explanation of things, but sufficiently independent to produce a credible book. Barack Obama's decision to open the White House to Jonathan Alter meets all three criteria, and in "The Promise: President Obama, Year One," the longtime Newsweek columnist has produced a deeply reported, soberly appraised account of the president's tumultuous first months in office through passage of healthcare reform.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Cary Elwes is writing a book about the making of the film "The Princess Bride. " Elwes, who played the dashing hero Westley, will publish the book in the fall of 2014 with Touchstone. Its title is bound to charm the film's fans: "As You Wish: Tales from the Princess Bride. " “It was a joy to work on such a magical film with an amazing cast of talented actors and friends,” Elwes said in a release about the book. “It will be great fun to revisit 'The Princess Bride' and to share my fond memories of the unforgettable experience we all had.” Elwes was inspired to write the book after joining the cast for a 25th anniversary screening last year in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Kevin Trudeau, the television pitchman who has been both successful and suspect, was sentenced to 10 years in prison Monday for making false claims, Reuters reports . Trudeau was found found guilty of criminal contempt in November in Chicago. The claims in question were made in Trudeau's book "The Weight Loss Cure 'They' Don't Want You To Know About" and the television spots that promoted it. In sentencing Trudeau, Judge Ronald Guzman said, "He is deceitful to the very core, and that type of conduct simply cannot stand.
IMAGE
December 1, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Several new style books focus on great American jewelry design. Here we zero in on two of the stand-out volumes of the season. David Webb: The Quintessential American Jeweler Ruth Peltason Assouline, $85 American jewelry designer David Webb was a fixture on New York's social scene during the 1960s and '70s, beloved by Diana Vreeland, Nan Kempner, Doris Duke, Elizabeth Taylor, Barbra Streisand and many other style-setters. Webb is perhaps best known for his animal bracelets, more fierce than cute, featuring lions, tigers and dragons, which were part of the ladies-who-lunch uniform of the day. But his legacy encompasses so much more, writes Ruth Peltason in "David Webb: The Quintessential American Jeweler.
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