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Booking Fees

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1992
Within the last year or so, jail booking fees have started to be charged to each city. This means that any person in a city or any person drifting through a city who breaks a law and gets booked into jail, costs your city $158. These fees can run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars and up to a million or so for the larger municipalities. Does the arrestee have to pay this fee since they are the ones who were arrested and generated the cost? Not on your life . . . that's too logical.
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NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Fliers won some and lost some Wednesday when the U.S. Department of Transportation revised effective dates for a hotly disputed rule that contains a grab-bag of consumer protections. Now some sections won't take effect until next year; others will start Aug. 23 as originally planned. Here's a scorecard for some key parts of the multi-part rule, which is labeled "Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections": -- A requirement that airlines advertise the full cost of airfares, including all mandatory taxes and fees, is being delayed until Jan. 24, 2012.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1991 | ALLAN L. ROEDER, Orange County's jail booking fees will join other new state and county costs incurred by cities. Costa Mesa City Manager ALLAN L. ROEDER estimates a $700,000 increase in fees to his city. He told the Times:
It's the cumulative effects of these changes that are going to have an effect on the city. With the jail booking fee itself, cities will look to one another to see what we can do to better utilize the space that we have. Some cities have their own space, and we will see them maximize that space in lieu of taking them to the county. We also will see a real change in procedure in the cite-and-release cases.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Former Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin reported that she had received at least $1.25 million for her memoir, "Going Rogue." A financial disclosure statement discusses Palin's finances from Jan. 1 to July 26, when she resigned as governor. Palin says she received the money from publisher HarperCollins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | THIA BELL
Ventura County's new policy of charging cities for booking their criminal suspects into County Jail has tipped Ojai's budget from black to red, City Manager Andrew Belknap said. In his midyear report to the City Council for the 1990-91 fiscal year, Belknap said the city's $4.4 million budget appears generally sound with most expenses and revenues running on track.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1991 | CARLOS V. LOZANO
The Simi Valley City Council voted Monday to formally oppose a Ventura County ordinance that would increase a fee charged to cities for booking and processing prisoners into the County Jail. The Ventura County Board of Supervisors approved the booking fee in September over the objections of city officials who said their municipalities could not afford it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1994 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eager to unload a $3-million debt, politicians from every Ventura County city are pressing the Board of Supervisors to stop billing them for the cost of booking inmates into jail. Instead of charging cities, local leaders say, the supervisors should dip into Proposition 172 half-cent sales tax revenues, which have been set aside to meet public safety needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1991 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite efforts by some police departments to reduce the number of suspects booked into County Jail, a booking fee charged to cities will still generate a projected $1 million annually, county officials said Thursday. The county recently billed cities $120 for each time that their police officers booked a person into County Jail. The bills totaled $517,080 for the six months between July and December, 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL
Thousand Oaks has joined three other Ventura County cities in refusing to pay fees for booking prisoners into the County Jail, officials said Tuesday. City Atty. Mark G. Sellers said he intends to file a formal protest of the fee in a letter to the county auditor. The Ventura County Board of Supervisors adopted the fees in September as a way to partially offset a $6-million cut in state funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1995 | PAUL ELIAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County's cities are reluctantly concluding that they will have to pay more for the criminals captured within their borders. So an end could be near in the cities' four-year legal battle with the county over nearly $4 million in jail booking fees, several mayors and other city officials acknowledged Tuesday. "I think that we recognize that we have to pay," Oxnard Mayor Manuel Lopez said. County officials said Oxnard owes $781,560, the largest booking bill in the county.
TRAVEL
November 11, 2007 | Jane Engle; Hugo Martin; Vani Rangachar
Priceline is breaking from the pack and eliminating booking fees for certain air tickets. Extending a promotion it began in June, Priceline said Monday that it would permanently end its $5-per-ticket fee for regular published fares. But you'll still pay fees on flights you win by bidding in its "Name Your Own Price" auctions. On those fares, this charge is wrapped into the total price, along with taxes and other fees. And just what is this charge? Priceline isn't saying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2006 | Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writers
David Gardner, the former chairman of the board of J. Paul Getty Trust, has returned nearly $100,000 of the money he was paid to write a coffee-table book on the history of the arts institution after he left the board in 2004 but never produced. The Getty asked Gardner to pay back the money after an internal investigation concluded that the book deal violated tax laws prohibiting excess compensation and self-dealing, Getty spokesman Ron Hartwig said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2000 | Dana Bushee, (714) 966-5636
The City Council approved a new fee Monday for those arrested and booked into Cypress City Jail. The council voted to amend a resolution, creating a $124 booking fee for arrested suspects. The fee would be imposed once the person is convicted of any criminal offense related to the arrest. It is estimated that the new fee will bring in $93,000 a year for the city. The Cypress Police Department makes about 1,500 arrests a year, with about half of those convicted, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1997
Recently, Crenshaw High School Principal Yolanda Anderson announced that the school's practice of charging students a $50 refundable fee for the use of textbooks is a violation of the State Education Code. Crenshaw will refund the fees to all students. A Crenshaw student spoke with MARY REESE BOYKIN about the charge. ERSNE EROMO 16, 11th grade magnet In class we discussed the fact that the $50 charge for a book deposit is illegal, since Crenshaw is a public school. My first thought was "Wow!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997
The Gardena City Council is considering a plan that would force those arrested for a crime to pay a booking fee for being jailed. The council has proposed adopting a $177 booking fee to cover time and expenses involved in transporting, fingerprinting and photographing suspects. Based on an average of 475 arrests each year, City Manager Ken Landau said, the fees would generate an estimated $85,000 annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1995
It was interesting to read about the privately operated jail in Seal Beach ("Seal Beach Locks In a Net Profit With Private Jail," Aug. 20). Without getting involved in an argument about whether punishment of people who violate the law should or should not be delegated to a private company which makes profit on it, there are some other points in the article that should be clarified. According to the report, the jail generates profits for the city by saving booking fees that would be paid to the county jail, from fees paid by the Federal Bureau of Prisons to house parole violators and from prisoners who pay $65 a day to stay in the Seal Beach jail rather than being transferred to the county jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1995 | JEFF BEAN
The City Council has passed an ordinance to recover jail booking fees the city pays to the county each time someone is arrested here and transported to the County Jail. The council unanimously agreed Tuesday to try to recover part of the $158 it pays for each prisoner arrested here and handed over to the county. "If there's any way you can figure out how to do it . . . let's give a crack at it," Councilwoman Collene Campbell said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1995 | PAUL ELIAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County officials and representatives of the county's 10 cities agreed Tuesday to settle a four-year, multimillion-dollar lawsuit over prisoner booking fees. The cities have agreed to pay nearly $1.7 million of the money owed to the county for booking prisoners between 1990 and 1994. In return, the county has agreed to stop billing the cities and instead charge convicted criminals $100 each time they are booked into Ventura County Jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1995 | PAUL ELIAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After years of fighting over who will pay to fingerprint, photograph and book inmates into jail, Ventura County and its 10 cities are on the brink of an agreement that would make the prisoners pick up the tab. The first night's accommodations at the Ventura County Jail could cost the suspect $100, if the county and cities agree to settle a long-simmering, multimillion-dollar lawsuit. Officials close to the negotiations say that could happen as early as next week.
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