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Booking Fees

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March 18, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The high-desert town of Adelanto in San Bernardino County is a small and gritty place with 13 police officers, a one-cell jail and more tumbleweeds than people. Yet each year, more than 1,500 arrests occur there--one for every 10 residents. So when Police Chief Philip Genaway heard about a new state law allowing the county to bill him $122.90 for every person his officers booked into the county jail, his reaction was sharp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1991 | ALLAN L. ROEDER, Orange County's jail booking fees will join other new state and county costs incurred by cities. Costa Mesa City Manager ALLAN L. ROEDER estimates a $700,000 increase in fees to his city. He told the Times:
It's the cumulative effects of these changes that are going to have an effect on the city. With the jail booking fee itself, cities will look to one another to see what we can do to better utilize the space that we have. Some cities have their own space, and we will see them maximize that space in lieu of taking them to the county. We also will see a real change in procedure in the cite-and-release cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | THIA BELL
Ventura County's new policy of charging cities for booking their criminal suspects into County Jail has tipped Ojai's budget from black to red, City Manager Andrew Belknap said. In his midyear report to the City Council for the 1990-91 fiscal year, Belknap said the city's $4.4 million budget appears generally sound with most expenses and revenues running on track.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1991
Your Jan. 20 editorial, "Cities Should Bite the Bullet, Absorb Fees," supported legislation passed last year authorizing counties to charge cities the actual costs of jail booking fees. The Times reached its conclusion based on the rationale that a result of Proposition 13 was to make counties an arm of the state, dependent on the state for revenues, while cities retained the ability to raise local fees. The new legislation did more than pass on the booking fees to cities; it also allows counties to charge school districts for the cost of collecting property taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1991 | JIM NEWTON and MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As they prepared to meet in special session, Orange County mayors overwhelmingly agreed Wednesday that a new county jail needs to be built, but they were divided about asking voters in May to consider a sales tax for construction. "The county is desperately in need of a jail--and I mean desperately," said Westminster Mayor Charles V. Smith, one of 25 mayors and mayors pro tem surveyed Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1991 | JAMES M. GOMEZ
State Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren on Thursday called for a review of the controversial new state law that allows counties to charge cities for booking prisoners into county jails, saying the practice may thwart local crime-fighting efforts. "I'm going to raise the issue; I'm going to pursue the issue," Lungren said. Lungren made the comment after meeting with the state's police chiefs during their annual convention at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1991 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite efforts by some police departments to reduce the number of suspects booked into County Jail, a booking fee charged to cities will still generate a projected $1 million annually, county officials said Thursday. The county recently billed cities $120 for each time that their police officers booked a person into County Jail. The bills totaled $517,080 for the six months between July and December, 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1991
This letter is in response to your editorial "Cities Should Bite the Bullet, Absorb Fees" (Jan. 20), which refers to the county's new authority to impose fees upon cities for booking prisoners into the county jail. This issue is critical to all Orange County residents and deserves the attention cities, the county and The Times have devoted to it. However, your treatment of the causes and implications of the state granting this authority was missing crucial facts. First, the costs associated with booking prisoners into the county jail are paid from property tax revenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1991
Robert Owens, Oxnard police chief Yes, very definitely. The Legislature demonstrated very poor judgment in facilitating the counties cannibalizing of the cities. This is just the most recent example of this sort of behavior. I'm sure the county can make a good case for needing the money, but pitting the counties against the cities is certainly not going to do anything for criminal justice. It is merely a case of looking around to see where money can be obtained. The county has said cities have greater abilities to generate tax revenue than do counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1990 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Area police agencies, struggling to absorb a $120 fee each time they book a prisoner at the Ventura County Jail, asked Monday that the burden be transferred to those convicted of crimes. In a letter to presiding judges of the county courts, five police departments and the sheriff's department asked that criminals be forced to pay most of the $1 million a year in booking fees that otherwise will be charged to cities beginning in January. The fees are retroactive to July 1.
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