Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBooks
IN THE NEWS

Books

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
In brief remarks Wednesday to the annual meeting of the Assn. of American Publishers in New York, First Lady Laura Bush called books her "greatest love affair" and warned that a "nation that does not read for itself cannot think for itself." Bush, a former librarian whose advocacy of books and literacy have long made her popular in the publishing industry, cited such fictional characters as the Brothers Karamazov and "an intriguing man named Gatsby" and worried that many Americans had never heard of them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Hannah Kuchler
Biz Stone is the other Twitter founder. Not the one who first came up with the idea, not the one with the original investment, but the founder famous for donning a nutty professor costume to introduce the messaging platform to the world in a comic video. In the torrid tale of Twitter's foundation - complete with betrayals and counter-betrayals - he was neither a back-stabber nor the back-stabbed. His new book from Grand Central Publishing, "Things a Little Bird Told Me: Confessions of the Creative Mind," offers a clue about why: He seems to be quite a nice guy. Management books written by nice guys do not abound.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2008 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
SEATTLE -- For all of Neal Stephenson's achievements, his most impressive may be his ability to attract a following equal parts hacker and literati. His popularity is all the more anomalous because his books are always long and often difficult. His last project, "The Baroque Cycle," was a fictional trilogy about the birth of capitalism and the history of science, set partly in 17th century London, stretching almost 2,700 pages and written with a fountain pen. His ambitious new novel, "Anathem," imagines a world dominated by casinos, shopping malls and tire shops -- except for the walled monasteries where the devout gather to contemplate big issues in the shadow of a clock that runs for thousands of years.
OPINION
April 12, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Reading is such an improbable idea -- a miracle, really. Yet simple squiggles on a page, arranged just so, can convey ideas that change the way we think or introduce to us characters we love for a lifetime. In celebration of reading -- and of this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books -- we asked four readers (who also happen to be writers) to celebrate books that mattered in their lives. The book was called "The Royal Road to Romance," and to a pre-adolescent boy with a fear of anything girlish, it sounded an awful lot like a bodice-ripper.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2008 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
Craig Johnson comes as advertised. Standing outside the Autry National Center on a boiling summer afternoon, the Wyoming-based crime novelist is decked out in a long-sleeve shirt made of heavy cotton, scuffed brown boots and a 10-gallon hat that provides shade, but not nearly enough. Spotting his interlocutor, Johnson sticks out his hand and delivers a booming "How ya doin'?!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Ever since Walt Disney began turning out feature-length animated films, scholars, theologians and journalists have plumbed the depths of the simple morality tales for deeper religious meanings and messages. Was Snow White's eating of the poison apple an allusion to the Fall in the Garden of Eden? When the puppet maker Geppetto was swallowed by a whale, was that a veiled reference to Jonah in Hebrew Scriptures? Were Jiminy Cricket's initials in "Pinocchio" a hidden reference to Jesus Christ?
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
In a speech that provoked angry rebuttals from administrators and some students, U.S. Secretary of Education William J. Bennett charged Monday that Stanford University's recent change in Western Culture studies was "an unfortunate capitulation to a campaign of pressure politics and intimidation." Bennett told a campus audience that protests by minority students scared the university into dropping a mandatory reading list of 15 classics from the course required for all freshmen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2004 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
The man who may be the next Hemingway is basically unreachable. At first call, Marc Bojanowski is bike riding down by the Russian River. At the next, he is actually in the river. Fishing. He has no cell phone. Doesn't believe in them. And he has no home. Is temporarily camping at his parents' house. Or maybe in their tool shed (he never says which). The shed is the place from which he eventually calls a reporter's answering machine.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
It was the wedding to end all weddings, and the media event to end all media events: the marriage in 1956 of American movie star-glamour queen Grace Kelly to the dashing Prince Rainier of Monaco. Caught up in this fast-lane fairy tale were six young women chosen to be Grace Kelly's bridesmaids. And now one of them has written a book about it, titled "The Bridesmaids." Author Judith Balaban Quine was one of the six who wore a daffodil yellow dress the day Kelly married her prince, along with Maree Frisby, Rita Gam, Carolyn Scott, Sally Parrish and Bettina Thompson.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1999 | GLENN LOVELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Outraged friends and colleagues are rallying to the defense of late '50s screen hunk Jeff Chandler to offset damage done to his reputation by Esther William's racy bestselling autobiography, "The Million Dollar Mermaid." According to Williams, who began a love affair with Chandler during the shooting of "Raw Wind in Eden" in 1956, Chandler was "happy and secure only in women's clothing." Cross-dressing, she writes, gave the actor a sexual thrill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Corina Knoll
All roads lead back to the Kogi truck. "It's like my 'Sweet Caroline' and I'm Neil Diamond," Roy Choi said. "I'll never be able to outlive Kogi. Kogi is a beast. " The chef was attempting to articulate what spawning that marvel of Korean barbecued ribs enveloped in tortillas has meant to him in front of a crowd at the 19th-annual L.A. Times Festival of Books. The sprawling two-day event at USC features readings, screenings, musical performances and cooking demonstrations. Under an unforgiving sun, hundreds listened as Choi conversed with Times food critic Jonathan Gold about the journey touched upon in his book "L.A.
HEALTH
April 12, 2014 | Rene Lynch
Hers is the Cinderella story of the fitness world. At age 40, Tosca Reno says she was nearly 80 pounds overweight, depressed and clinging to a bad marriage because, as a stay-at-home mother, she feared she couldn't raise her three young girls on her own. Today, at 53, she is one of the most recognized celebrities in the fitness world -- and not only because she recently posed for the cover of Oxygen magazine in a blue bikini that showed off...
TRAVEL
April 6, 2014
ENGLAND Presentation Actress and writer Diz White will discuss how she came to write her travel humor book "Cotswolds Memoir: Discovering a Beautiful Region of Britain on a Quest to Buy a 17th Century Cottage. " When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. HIKING Workshop Linda Mulally will share tips on hiking and backpacking with your dog. When, where: 7 p.m. Tuesday at the REI store in Santa Monica, 402 Santa Monica Blvd.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2014 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I am in a new relationship with a great woman. I've talked a little bit about money and retirement with her (she's 30). I am trying to let her know that it would be wise to contribute at least enough to her company's retirement program to get the full match. What are some books or articles that would show her the importance of saving for retirement? I like her, but this can be a deal breaker for me. What is the best way to introduce her to personal finances without scaring her?
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
At a time when public trust in Wall Street already is at a low, new allegations about high-speed stock trading threaten to further erode confidence in the financial markets. The furor centers on accusations that professional traders armed with ultra-fast computers have rigged the stock market. High-speed firms engage in what critics say amounts to insider trading, using super-charged systems to decipher trading patterns. Criticism of high-frequency trading has long swirled in financial circles, and multiple regulators are conducting investigations.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | David Lazarus
Airlines will never win a prize for sensitivity to customers' problems. They typically won't budge on change fees and ticketing costs. But you'd think that even the most hard-hearted carrier would acknowledge that, all things considered, this isn't the best time for a family trip to Russia. The situation in Ukraine prompted the U.S. State Department to issue a travel advisory March 14 warning Americans about "the possibility of violence or anti-U.S. actions directed against U.S. citizens or U.S. interests.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | JAMES ENDRST, Hartford Courant
It is cruel but fair to say that Salman Rushdie's career owes much to the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. It was not "The Satanic Verses" but the death sentence imposed by Khomeini that boosted Rushdie's book sales, made the author a living martyr for free expression and--because he was forced into hiding, where he remains--made him a mystery man as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
How many hours a week do you read? If it's 10 hours or more, you might try moving to India -- you'll be among your people. According to this infographic, Indians spend more time reading books than the residents of any other nation. Each week, the average Indian reads for 10 hours, 42 minutes. Americans read books only about half that amount: 5 hours and 42 minutes. Interestingly, Americans and Germans spend exactly the same amount of time reading. The big reading nations, after India, are Thailand (9 hours, 24 minutes)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Librarians aren't known for being loud, but Gov. Jerry Brown may hear some raised voices from that scholarly crowd over his decision Tuesday to appoint a politically connected journalist as the state librarian. Greg Lucas, 55, is a former political reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle. Since 2011, he has been a senior editor for the Sacramento website Capitol Weekly, which covers California politics, and he writes and edits California's Capitol, a website he created that also delves into politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
At least 25 streets and 46 schools are named in his honor, but many young people know little about Cesar Chavez, who in life was a polarizing figure, most famous for the successful series of marches, fasts and strikes he led on behalf of mostly immigrant farmworkers. The next big act of Chavez's afterlife begins this month, with the first dramatic film about the towering Chicano figure and a major biography due out days before California and other states celebrate Cesar Chavez Day on March 31. Both projects seek to reclaim Chavez's place in the American memory.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|