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Booster Shots

NEWS
October 12, 2008 | Susan Brink; Colin Ryan; Lance Pugmire
BOOSTER SHOTS Everybody is worried about the rising cost of prescription drugs, but conventional wisdom suggests older people worry more. Not so, says a new survey by Medco, a pharmacy benefit manager. According to the new national survey "Feeling the Health Care Pinch," nearly 70% of people ages 25 to 34 say the economic downturn of the last 12 months has made it somewhat or significantly more difficult to pay for healthcare. Among people older than 55, less than half said that.
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NEWS
July 28, 2010
Apps, you may have heard, are hot hot hot, and health ones are proliferating like bunnies. The U.S. Department of Agriculture sees this trend as a good way to lure in children to the habit of healthy living, and with that in mind they sponsored an apps-for-kids competition. ( It's part of First Lady Michele Obama's Let's Move! Campaign. ) Since March, when the contest began, the agency has received 95 entries. The Apps for Healthy Kids contest has reached the judging stage, and the public is invited to vote for the two Popular Choice Awards.
NEWS
July 21, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The major medical organization representing obstetricians said Wednesday that a vaginal birth after caesarean is a safe and appropriate choice for most women who have had a prior C-section, including some women who have had two prior C-sections. The guidelines were issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Hospital policies, legal concerns, insurance restrictions and factors related to doctor and patient convenience often prevent women who could have a VBAC from getting one. "Moving forward, we need to work collaboratively with our patients and our colleagues, hospitals and insurers to swing the pendulum back to fewer caesareans and a more reasonable VBAC rate," Dr. Richard N. Waldman, president of ACOG, said in a news release.
NEWS
July 22, 2010 | Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Here's some news you've been waiting for: Chocolate is a health food! Well, maybe not. But it can be part of a healthy diet. It's true – 70% of dietitians said you can eat 100 calories worth of chocolate each day "while maintaining a balanced lifestyle." Nearly as many agreed that you could eat that much chocolate daily and still lose weight. OK, so that survey was not scientific, and the results don't necessarily reflect the opinions of dietitians as a whole. But the survey sponsor is still eager to share its finding that nine out of 10 registered dietitians say people are more likely to stick with a weight-loss diet if the plan includes "treats."
NEWS
July 20, 2010 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Ahoy, parents out there: How do you feel about a DNA test that could tell you what genetic risks your kids carry for medical problems such as heart disease, diabetes and more? A nationally representative poll of 1,461 parents suggests a great many of us would like to use such at-home genetic tests for our children. In findings from the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health, 53% said they were very or somewhat interested in such tests, for the most part because they hoped it would help them prevent disease in their kids.
NEWS
August 9, 2009 | David Colker; Shari Roan; Deborah Bonello
TECHNOLOGY Movie help for when you gotta go Just when you thought the Internet provided every possible information service, along comes Runpee.com. The site lists movies in theaters and suggests points in the action during which you could quickly run to the restroom without missing anything substantial. For example, let's say you're watching the latest "Harry Potter" movie and feeling the need. Runpee (which almost sounds like the name of a character in the movie) suggests you hold on until minute 33, at which point "Dumbledore says, 'Off to bed, pip-pip.
NEWS
October 26, 2008 | Shari Roan; Johanna Neuman; Sarah Rogers
BOOSTER SHOTS General anesthesia may increase the risk of behavioral and developmental problems in young children, according to a study presented last week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists in Orlando. Studies in animals have suggested that general anesthesia may be toxic to a developing brain. To assess the risk in children, Dr. Lena S. Sun of Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons analyzed data from 625 children younger than 3 who were exposed to general anesthesia as part of an uncomplicated hernia repair.
NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
There are so many things wrong with flu shots . For starters, they usually involve needles. The alternative, spraying vaccine up into the nose, isn't exactly comfortable either. There are logistical problems too. Flu vaccine has to be kept refrigerated or else it will go bad. The shots and sprays must be administered by a doctor or nurse, which typically necessitates a trip to a medical office. Then there is the problem of disposing of so many syringes and spray tubes.
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