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Booster Shots

NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
There are so many things wrong with flu shots . For starters, they usually involve needles. The alternative, spraying vaccine up into the nose, isn't exactly comfortable either. There are logistical problems too. Flu vaccine has to be kept refrigerated or else it will go bad. The shots and sprays must be administered by a doctor or nurse, which typically necessitates a trip to a medical office. Then there is the problem of disposing of so many syringes and spray tubes.
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NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times
In vitro fertilization treatment can be emotionally grueling and prohibitively expensive, and some people decide they can't — they absolutely can't — go through it again. If only there was a way to accurately predict the chance that such treatments would lead to a real-life bundle of crying, needy, with-you-for-18-years-minimum joy. Stanford University researchers say they've done it, at least for women who've already had one round of IVF. In research published online Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they explain their model for predicting the odds that a live birth will result from IVF treatment.
NEWS
July 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
In the absence of a vaccine against the AIDS virus, the most effective treatment method is aggressive treatment of HIV infections with cocktails of antiretroviral drugs, an approach known as highly active antiretroviral therapy or HAART. A new study conducted in British Columbia has found that the infection rate in the province has been halved since 1996 by the widespread adoption of HAART, researchers reported online Sunday in the journal Lancet and at the International AIDS Conference in Vienna.
NEWS
July 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An international panel of AIDS experts Sunday recommended earlier treatment for HIV infections in an effort to prevent the development not only of full-blown AIDS, but of other complications of infection as well. The International AIDS Society-USA Antiretroviral Therapy Guidelines Panel, which makes nonbinding recommendations about HIV treatment, had previously recommended that treatment be initiated when CD4 levels fall below 350 cells per cubic millimeter. In an article Sunday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
July 17, 2010 | By Jessie Schiewe, Los Angeles Times
Long day at work? Stressed about paying your bills? How tempting, at such times, to reach for a drink.... If that sounds like you, here's some sobering news from a study published online in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Assn.: The risk of stroke appears to double in the hour after consuming alcohol. After interviewing 390 ischemic stroke patients about their drinking patterns within three days after their stroke, researchers concluded that the risk of ischemic stroke is 2.3 times higher in the hour after alcohol is consumed than it is during periods of no alcohol consumption.
NEWS
July 16, 2010 | By Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times
Worry about earthquakes if you want, but old-fashioned heat might pose a bigger threat. "Historically, from 1979 to 2003, excessive heat exposure caused 8,015 deaths in the United States. During this period, more people in this country died from extreme heat than from hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, floods and earthquakes combined. In 2001, 300 deaths were caused by excessive heat exposure." So begins the heatstroke prevention guide from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: " Extreme Heat: A Prevention Guide to Promote Your Personal Health and Safety ."
NEWS
July 16, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An infection by the virus that causes AIDS can increase risk of premature death even before the immune system has deteriorated to the point where most physicians begin antiviral therapy, British researchers said Thursday. An infection by the virus that causes AIDS can increase risk of premature death even before the immune system has deteriorated to the point where most physicians begin antiviral therapy, British researchers reported Thursday. The finding suggests that treatment should start even earlier than it is now and supports the current plans of world bodies to begin treating HIV infections in the developing world earlier.
NEWS
July 16, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Habitual high-heel wearers, your attention, please. You know that feeling you get when you first slip off those impossibly high stilettos (the feeling after relief)? That tightness in your Achilles' tendons as feet assume a natural position, with heels on the floor? Researchers think they may know the reason for that. A new study in the Journal of Experimental Biology tried to determine why women feel that tautness in the backs of their ankles after wearing high heels for long periods of time.
NEWS
July 16, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Disrupted sleep patterns seem to contribute to the risk of obesity and diabetes, according to numerous studies. Researchers have theorized that disrupted circadian rhythms throw off various hormonal processes in the body that contribute to disease. This theory is looking stronger all the time, and the mounting evidence bolsters the argument that people should care about their sleep habits. Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas have found that mice with defective copies of two genes involved in circadian rhythms develop abnormalities in their pancreatic cells that eventually cause problems with the release of insulin.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
A teaspoon is a teaspoon is a teaspoon … right? Not exactly, as researchers tested several household spoons used to give medicine, finding wide variations in capacity. The study took place in Attica, Greece, where 25 women allowed their teaspoons (71 total) and tablespoons (49 total) to be measured. A standard teaspoon measure is about 5 milliliters, and a tablespoon is about 14.9 milliliters. The teaspoons the researchers collected had capacities ranging from 2.5 ml to 7.3 ml. The volume of the various tablespoons ranged from 6.7 ml to 13.4 ml. Some homes had a variety of spoons with different volumes.
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